Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
143,590 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Neat FREEZE FRAME photo.
Follow the center line of the bullet directly back to the muzzle. Photographer is calling it the Bullet Yaw.
Should that hammer be showing as fully rearward in that photo?
What are the options for that hammer being back there?
(1) ~ It's rebounded ? :confused:

(2) ~ The first part of the freeze photo exposure was taken prior to the trigger being pulled ? :confused:

(3) ~ This shooter has made a lightning fast "follow up" shot ? :poke:


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,352 Posts
ya got some good questions there even with a super high speed sync it would be tough to get hammer back in the photo again ...

Course b4 i run my mouth to much better go look at my pics and see where slide and hammer is
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,213 Posts
On my 686, there's a slight creep right at the point of no return on the trigger.

You wouldn't know it was there if you haven't dry fired it a lot. I've almost gotten to the point where I can pull the trigger back to that point and hold it there. Basically it's like pulling off a single action shot to complete the trigger pull and fire the gun.

When I have the trigger held at that moment, just before the point of no return, the hammer is halfway cocked.

My theory is that this shooter is a very good revolver shooter with a lot more practice than I have. I think he's gotten to the point he's perfected this kind of trigger pull, and the photo is taken a split second after he has just pulled that trigger past the point of no return for a follow up shot. Does that make any sense at all?

Either that, or it's a fake made by or for people who don't know any better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,352 Posts
Ill get the specs for shutter speed etc here in a min if i can pick them out the file

Ok this was taken with my Digtal d--30

Shutter speed of 1/1600th
Iso 100
Apture 2.8
probley with my 80-200mm lens

No Flash ...

So the first pic im guessing is photo chopped as ya can see the slide is just starting to move in this pic and see the puff of smoke out the chamber and see the streak of the bullet ...


UnLess they were using the very expensive sound trigger and super high sync flashes etc etc ... Even with that still dont think itll catch the hammer back.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
143,590 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Euclidean

I just don't know. It's a mystery to me. But I caught it right away.
It just seems to me that in a normal "freeze frame" the hammer would naturally be in the forward position.
Could he be holding the trigger in that position for a second shot while his first fired bullet is barely out of the barrel??? :confused:

Meanwhile that is a great photo Bud!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I would say there is definitely something wrong with this photograph. I can't see the hammer being cocked again in the few thousandth's of a second it took the bullet to travel down the barrel and another six or eight inches. That would also mean the cylinder has advanced to the next chamber and should be locked in position. And, it does not appear the weapon has begun to recoil yet. It all happened pretty fast, doncha' think? And isn't that a pretty good sized bullet for that handgun? Not impossible but most folks I know do not shoot the heaviest bullets in a short barreled revolver. Further I sayeth naught.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,352 Posts
Another Thing No blur of recoil i have one of 44 mag where the flames are coming out etc etc you can see where the gun was recoiling during the pic let me see if i can dig it up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,213 Posts
I propose:

Either the person firing it is an expert revolver user who has perfected the trigger pull and is far better than I am at handling recoil, or it is bunk.

I do think it's physically possible for it to happen, but extremely, extremely unlikely unless you were an excellent shooter. I know I sure couldn't mimic that feat if the photo is genuine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,352 Posts
i guess this one isnt as good of a example as it is a low light pic can see the bullet either but

1/6th shutter speed
400 iso
2.8

Same digi camera as above pic
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
143,590 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The Photo

Well, I came across the photo in a google image search for Smith Wesson because I was looking for this one picture that I saw of a fully engraved "Smith"
This photo was in a gallery of professional photographs & was the only gun related photo in there. I know nothing more about it.

Unless part of an exposure (like a double exposure) was taken first of the revolver just prior to firing & then a "Freeze Frame" of the actual shot/bullet ??? I really don't know.
Just does not seem to be enough muzzle blast there either & would the exact position of the bullet be THAT MUCH HIGHER than the center line of the muzzle/bore...THAT CLOSE to the pistol???
This frozen frame would had to have been caught Before The Revolver started to recoil & (I'm Guessing) even before more muzzle blast exited the barrel. ??? Any guess is as good as mine.

ADDITION...It was a scientific photo exhibition so I don't think the photo was faked. Here is the only info available.
Caption:
EG&G high-speed flash to freeze motion. Original photographed on 4x5-inch Kodak Tri-X Professional pushed to ISO 3200. Bullet is demonstrating 'yaw' as it exits the barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,213 Posts
I think Bud's photo proves some shenanigans are going on here. The flash isn't represented in any way in the photo in question. The bullet could not be that close without some evidence of the flash, surely.

So even if my idea of the expert shooter who could manipulate the trigger so well panned out, it would suggest someone must have retouched the picture to remove the flash, and why would anyone do that?

They wouldn't. They'd just fake it in the first place.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it until someone who works for a forensics unit tells me different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,352 Posts
QK even with high speed flash and tri x pushed to 3200 which i have done ... the hammer back is still the problem if if its as you posted above a super quick follow up shot i think cylinder would be blured from turning .... double exposure you can do that but not one shot ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,213 Posts
I don't think the cylinder would be blurred... its movement, quick as it is, is visible with the naked eye. I think a camera set like you describe would get a clear picture of it in any case.

I sticking with the "It looks good, maybe parts of it are feasible if very unlikely, but it don't hold water" theory.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
143,590 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
It has me stumped

Unless as you guys say...Some Sing Wong with the legitimacy of the photo.
I am just going by my gut as a long time shooter & it does not look/feel right to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,352 Posts
By no means am i a pro photographer but it has been my hobbie almost as long as guns and ive spent a ton on both ..... But it still has a fudged feeling to me
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
143,590 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Neat!

We create a beautiful hidden universe every time we pull the trigger!
I can't think of a better reason to Buy More Ammo! :biggrin:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,045 Posts
IMO, it's impossible for that to be an undoctored photo. You can take a ruler and the bullet is perfectly lined up with the barrel. With the bullet that distance from the barrel, he could not have made the shot, reacted to the recoil and about to drop the hammer again with virtually no movement. The gun's details are sharp as is the hammer and the hand. Does it look to anyone else that the bullet itself might be tipped a bit downward (very slight) despite the fact that it is aligned with the barrel?
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top