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Holly and I were driving home late around 11:30pm and we see an enormous Husky dog (Siberian Husky likely?) running down the middle of the overpass. Several cars swerved in opposite directions and there was almost an accident. We stopped alongside the shoulder (while all other cars were halted in the middle of the street) and I called to the dog...it came right right over excitedly. Looking back, I question my judgement but the poor dog was obviously collared and frozen in the middle of the busy street. He quickly ran over, tail wagging and breathing heavily...we called the police and explained the situation and how there was nearly an accident and that this was obviously someone's pet. There was no ID on the collar. After about 30 minutes of being transfered to different people and being told that the police don't pick up animals, the woman I had been talking with the most finally called me back and said that an officer was on the way to pick up the dog. Animal control here in Eugene, OR is practically non-existent and the "pound" didn't open up until Tuesday morning (this was Saturday night). So the officer arrives, and he's a very young guy (I'm 28, and he looks younger than me), but very, very cool with a great sense of humor from the start. After I had established a good connection with him, I realized I had completely forgot to mention that I was carrying (I had always told myself I would let an LEO know out of courtesy, and this actually is my first experience with an LEO since carrying!). I mention that I am armed in my front right pocket and have my carry license. All he said in response was that he would not advise telling other officers that! It was along the lines of: "Wow, I'd keep that information to yourself!" I said something like: "Oh, alright! Just didn't want there to be any surprises, you never know..."

But the officer was great, he took the dog, and we went home. It was funny, they originally told me that officers do not come and pick up animals -- I have a feeling that the lady we talked to pulled a few strings...or it was a really slow night!

We felt good about everything in the end. Both the woman on the line and the officer thanked us again and again for stopping to retrieve the animal.
 

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Sounds like a good experience.

I'm glad you took care of the dog. I'm an animal lover too and agonize at the though of seeing someones pet run down in traffic. Not to mention the possibility of injured people involved in an accident.

Obviously the dog was very confused and scared. It was happy to accept help from strangers. Had the dog displayed any aggressive posturing, you couldn't have done that, but by your description, it was very glad to get a helping hand. Good job guys!

:hand10:
 

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Sounds like a good experience.

I'm glad you took care of the dog. I'm an animal lover too and agonize at the though of seeing someones pet run down in traffic. Not to mention the possibility of injured people involved in an accident.

Obviously the dog was very confused and scared. It was happy to accept help from strangers. Had the dog displayed any aggressive posturing, you couldn't have done that, but by your description, it was very glad to get a helping hand. Good job guys!

:hand10:
I agree, good job!

Although I'm confused by the officers reaction to your notification. Are you required to notify in your state? I realize he hadn't pulled you over or anything, and I do agree that you did the right thing by notifying him.

Joker1
 

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My daughter and her husband have a truly beautiful Siberian Husky who just loves to run. I pictured him as I read your story and how my daughter would feel should she lose Saber. That was a great act of animal kindness of you to stop for the poor thing and also speaks well of the police dispatcher and the officer. Thank you all.

And I've had dealings with the police numerous times as a matter of job circumstance since I've started legally carrying concealed. I never considered mentioning the fact that I'm armed. I was of the impression that unless I thought I would be subject to reasonable search there was no need.
 

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About the not picking up dogs... that is our policy too. However, I will as will most other officers I work with as long as time and resources permit. I hate to see a good dog hurt or killed, and most of the time we can track down the owner pretty quick. Then everybody is happy. I like sending a lost pup home.
When training rookies, I actually hope we get a few dog calls. Its great training to sharpen investigative skills. Sounds stupid, but if you really think about it, it makes sense.
 

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Good job saving the dog and possibly a person if it had caused an accident.

It's funny how aminal control and the PD interact in different jurisdictions.

Here the animal control is part of the PD or the Sheriffs office, I can't remember which. They have one or two "officers" who handle all the animal calls.

A friend of mine lives in a little podunk town here in KS and one day I was at his house and his dog had escaped and was missing. We looked for it for a while to no avail. I mean we covered the whole town, all eight blocks of it. He then drives to the local Police Dept. with one guy (dispatcher?)staffing it on a Saturday. I'm thinking, do the Police really care if your dog is missing? Is this really a matter that they are interested in handling?

He tells the guy his dog is lost, the guy asks all kinds of questions about where the dog was last seen and what it looks like, is it the old black one or that young yelllow lab pup you have? etc. Then he says "I'll let so and so (THE officer on duty) know to be on the lookout and we'll give you a call if we find him." The guy was really excited about looking for my friends dog, almost giddy. It was like, "Oh boy, this is great, we finally have something to do."

It just struck me as funny how the cops told you they don't pick up dogs where you live and in his town they seem to love the "action" of a lost dog report. They really are bored out of their minds in those little towns where nothing ever happens. It's like Mayberry or something. Much different in than in the big city.

Oh, by the way, a neighbor found the dog later that day.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the comments. In Oregon, there is no law to notify. And after having my first experience, and especially in this case, it's true -- I really don't see a need or purpose to notify -- I probably won't if a similar situation arises...(now that I got this first one out of my system! ;-) Of course, Holly was armed in the car, and I didn't even think to mention that...my mind was so much on the dog that we'd just spend almost 45 minutes with on the side of the road.

I wonder how often people forget to mention (when it IS law) in a fast-paced situation!
 

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I've been known to take "animal calls" while on duty.
Sometimes, in a little hick town of less than 1300 people...its the only exciting work that one might get on a shift.

One thing about it, if a dog is causing a traffic incident I will take care of it one way or the other. No sense letting someone get killed over it.
 

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Nice job! I keep a extra leash and collar in our vehicles to pick up four legged hitch hikers. My wife and I have picked up several over the years. Sometimes you can find the owners through microchips.
 

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In the NRA class we took to get the cert required for our carry permits we were advised NOT to mention that you're armed to the police, unless they ask or they're getting to the point where they're going to find out, such as searching you or your car. They usually ask, you know, "Are you armed, am I going to find anything on you, etc..." before they start. That's the time to say yes.
The instructor did say definitely don't let them find it on their own, or you're probably getting a free trip to the ground.
 

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Good job on you two for taking care of the dog and possibly preventing a car accident.

Your situation is a good example of how the unexpected can happen: you two were out late at night, and something happened which led to you being outside your vehicle and exposed to whomever happened along. Fortunately, you were armed because of decisions you had made earlier in the evening. Good for Holly for being armed also!
 

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Way to go! You went out of your way to be a good neighbor, a good citizen, and an animal lover. That shows a lot of heart and class.

Good job with the LEO as well. My policy is to inform rather than wait, though that depends on the situation, who is around, and if it will do more harm than good.
 

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A few years ago, at 3AM, I was at a 24-hour emergency vet having my pal attended to. In walks a big state trooper with an injured puppy in his arms that he had picked up from the road. I consider that one of the best things I ever saw from a cop. It actually brought a tear to my eye, as corny as that sounds.

So KUDOS to all LEO's who have the decency and heart to help out our 4-legged friends.

-
 

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I'm glad y'all took the time to make sure that dog was taken care of! To many folks these days seem to have no time to mess with things that really count!
 

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I just wanted to comment on informing LEO's of you carry status as you (Zach) were told by the officer to not necessarily inform them in the future.

First I want to say that in my State, Missouri, we are not required by law to inform LEO's unless they ask if you have any weapons.

That said, one of the most dangerous aspects of law enforcement besides responding to domestic disturbances is the "traffic stop." They have a lot on their mind when they approach your vehicle. Being hit by passing motorists as well as other officer safety issues. I'm not sure of the actual percentage and not sure if a definitive study has been done or not, but a very high percentage of LEO gunfights take place at the side of the road during the traffic stop. They are pulling you over for a reason. Usually some sort of violation. They have no idea who you are or what is lurking in your mind. The more occupants in the vehicle, the more possible problems for the officer to face. So, for that reason, if I am pulled over by an LEO, out of courtesy, I will inform him or her of my ccw status if I am carrying. (which I always am anyway) Yes, as soon as he runs my drivers license, it will come back from dispatch (in my State) that I am a ccw holder. But before that, he has to approach me and retrieve my information first, return to his vehicle and run my license with the dispatcher or on his "in car computer." So, when I hand him my drivers license, my ccw permit goes with it and I will say I'm a ccw holder and I'm carrying a weapon. That's It! From there on, I Follow His Lead and Instructions! If he just says, "you don't go for yours and I won't go for mine," that's cool. If he wants to know where I keep it. No problem. If he wants me to step out of the car and disarm. It's certainly within his prerogative to make that request. And of course, I'll comply.

For other routine interactions, such as the encounter the OP had regarding the dog in the roadway, I don't feel it is necessary to inform the LEO when interacting on "public service" type of interactions. I just think it seems to go easier that way. Kind of like informing the LEO just because you are standing next to one at McDonalds. I think most LEO's will just think that is kind of weird and not necessary.

Now again, in my State, we are not required to inform. I only do out of courtesy when they are initiating a car stop or some other type of investigative stop where I am their subject of interest. I just want everyone, including the LEO to go home safely and cause them the least amount of tension as possible on my account.

If your State has a requirement to inform on every business contact with an LEO, then by all means, do so. It could cause you a great deal of regret for failing to do so.

Just my personal policy so your mileage may vary depending on your State requirements.
 

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OK - here's my take.

Most people here carry to protect their lives. You obviously carry to protect yourself and your family.

Why would you risk your life and that of your spouse for a stray dog? You stated you witnessed a near-accident already. If you go into the road to rescue a dog, you could very likely have been struck by some drunk weaving home from the bar at that time of night. Also, you are now outside your vehicle late at night focusing on a stray dog instead of whatever else may be going on around you and your wife.

I am am animal lover as well, but I will not risk my life or that of my spouse for a stray dog. I have actually killed a couple dogs that were in the road. In each case, there was oncoming traffic on a two lane road, and I am not going to plow headlong into oncoming traffic or drive into a ditch at 60 mph over a stray animal. I felt badly, but if the choice is taking a great risk to my personal safety, the stray dog loses every time.
 

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Good on you for saving the dog, But......... Why would you tell the officer you were carrying? Even if your state had a "must notify" law (which it doesn't), it only pertains when the officer contacts you on official business, ie: traffic stop, domestic, investigation, etc. A lost dog scenario is not technically official business. You got a verbal reaction from the officer which basically told you to keep your mouth shut. I can guarantee you the officer had a different reply he kept to himself.

A CCW permit is not an excuse to yell "Look at me"
 

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OK - here's my take.
Why would you risk your life and that of your spouse for a stray dog? You stated you witnessed a near-accident already. If you go into the road to rescue a dog, you could very likely have been struck by some drunk weaving home from the bar at that time of night. Also, you are now outside your vehicle late at night focusing on a stray dog instead of whatever else may be going on around you and your wife.

I am am animal lover as well, but I will not risk my life or that of my spouse for a stray dog. I have actually killed a couple dogs that were in the road. In each case, there was oncoming traffic on a two lane road, and I am not going to plow headlong into oncoming traffic or drive into a ditch at 60 mph over a stray animal. I felt badly, but if the choice is taking a great risk to my personal safety, the stray dog loses every time.
um ok maybe you didn't read all that he wrote as I know sometimes happens. So in case you didn't he mentioned that traffic had stopped for this dog. Also with a second person she watch your six if need be. But as he had said all the traffic had stopped.
 

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um ok maybe you didn't read all that he wrote as I know sometimes happens. So in case you didn't he mentioned that traffic had stopped for this dog. Also with a second person she watch your six if need be. But as he had said all the traffic had stopped.
I actually did read all he wrote. He said the traffic was stopped and he pulled to the side of the roadway. The fact the traffic stopped doesn't preclude the town drunk from plowing into the back of your car or into the stopped traffic. Thousands of motorists, roadway workers, and LEOs have been killed or injured when they have been parked on the side of the roadway.

It's dangerous enough when you have a flat tire or an emergency and need to pull over. Personally, I am not risking my safety or that of my family running around in the road or even sitting along the side of an active roadway to chase down a stray dog late at night.

I am not bagging on this guy 'cuz he wanted to rescue the dog. I am simply pointing out the numerous risks involved given the time of day and the location.
 
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