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I would turn your weak hand so that when you open your fingers, they point down, make sure your strong hand is as high as possible on the back strap, unlock your strong side elbow, and square up to the target.

About 60% of the squeeze should be done with your weak hand, and get your finger off the trigger!
 

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70% - 30% (support/strong hand) is where the grip should be coming from.

Make sure those thumbs are just along for the ride, and are not "pushing down" as you'll notice the barrel will dip and your shots will be a tad bit low.

Other than that, hard to say without seeing you dry fire live.

As someone else said, index that finger. Seems your support (I hate the term 'weak') index finger overlaps your trigger finger, making it an extra step to move it to index your trigger finger so might want to take that off the trigger guard? Again, less movement = better.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I put a snap cap in there so I could wiggle the trigger a bit and make it feel as real as possible. I'll try your other recommendations but I don't understand what you are saying about pointing my weak side fingers down. Do you mean just a little more down than what they are such as they should he horizontal with the horizon?
 

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The way your hands are in the pic, hold your gun that way, open or point all fingers on your left hand. Twist your entire left hand until your fingers are pointed down, then re-grip the gun. They don't need to be pointed straight down, this is just to help with recoil management. The palms of your hands should cover the entire grip of the gun, The more gaps you have, the less recoil management you have.

Try to get your palms to match up with each other. This will also take your left index finger off the trigger guard, helping you to be able to properly index your trigger finger.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
70% - 30% (support/strong hand) is where the grip should be coming from.

Make sure those thumbs are just along for the ride, and are not "pushing down" as you'll notice the barrel will dip and your shots will be a tad bit low.

Other than that, hard to say without seeing you dry fire live.

As someone else said, index that finger. Seems your support (I hate the term 'weak') index finger overlaps your trigger finger, making it an extra step to move it to index your trigger finger so might want to take that off the trigger guard? Again, less movement = better.
My thumbs press inward towards the barrel. Is that OK? I took my support index finger off the trigger guard and overlapped it on the strong middle finger and that does feel more natural thanks.
 

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Your thumbs should be relaxed, not pressing anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The way your hands are in the pic, hold your gun that way, open or point all fingers on your left hand. Twist your entire left hand until your fingers are pointed down, then re-grip the gun. They don't need to be pointed straight down, this is just to help with recoil management. The palms of your hands should cover the entire grip of the gun, The more gaps you have, the less recoil management you have.

Try to get your palms to match up with each other. This will also take your left index finger off the trigger guard, helping you to be able to properly index your trigger finger.
If I am following you correctly you are saying to have my support hand cup the bottom of the grip in a way that a hand could cup water. Is that what you are saying? Sorry if I have misunderstood.
 

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If I am following you correctly you are saying to have my support hand cup the bottom of the grip in a way that a hand could cup water. Is that what you are saying? Sorry if I have misunderstood.
no, just lower your weak side hand so your index finger is below the trigger guard
 

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Your thumbs should be relaxed, not pressing anywhere.
This! My instructor always used to yell at me, "Your thumbs are just along for the ride!"

Took awhile for it to sink in, but once it did I could place my shots on target for more reliably than before.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
This! My instructor always used to yell at me, "Your thumbs are just along for the ride!"

Took awhile for it to sink in, but once it did I could place my shots on target for more reliably than before.
Thanks,,,,, I was under the impression that my thumbs here needed for support. I'm glad to know I can relax them when I shoot. I was trying to use them to help with recoil. I had a few FTE and was sure it was due to limp writings. Thats why I was sure I needed a new grip.
 

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With the weaver stance isn't the weak foot more forward than the strong foot and then the weak shoulder more forward than the dominant shoulder?
yes, I tend to go Weaver more than Isoceles, but my CC instructor recomended trying to concentrate on Isoceles. I dont know why, but Weaver just feels more natural

edit - I may be completely off on this, but when i look at someone standing Weaver, it looks like more of a Offensive stance, where Isoceles seems more Defensive... again, this is just my opinion on their appearance, i dont know the history on these stances,
 

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What I have learned (from experience) is that isosceles is more a more stable shooting platform. I also preferred weaver until I was recommended by my academy range instructor to adopt the isosceles (somewhat) stance. It is more mobile, without losing your master firing grip, and much much better at recoil management. It was very uncomfortable to use at first, but my shooting has improved quite a bit since using it.
 

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Another thing to try is this. Take your off hand thumb and put it just under the strong hand thumb. Not on top of it. The last knuckle of the off hand thumb should rest just under the crease where the strong hand thumb meets the hand. One on top of the other. Strong thumb on top of off thumb. This may put your off hand thumb on the trigger guard, perpendicular to your strong hand thumb. Now curl your weak hand fingers down and back a bit, just take up the tension. You should feel the tendon on top of your off hand wrist tighten up. Helps tame the recoil some too.

Another thing that I am trying to do is tell my brain to let my off hand thumb point the gun. No tension or force. Just mentally thinking to myself that the thumb needs to point where I want to shoot. I need to get to the range and give it a try. Mainly if I need to fire from the hip and can't use the sites.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What I have learned (from experience) is that isosceles is more a more stable shooting platform. I also preferred weaver until I was recommended by my academy range instructor to adopt the isosceles (somewhat) stance. It is more mobile, without losing your master firing grip, and much much better at recoil management. It was very uncomfortable to use at first, but my shooting has improved quite a bit since using it.
Im a new shooter and havent tried the isosceles yet. Thanks for the insights. Looks like I need to make it to the range again before my CCW class next week. :hand10:
 

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You look pretty good to me. I prefer a Weaver stance as well.

Isosceles is at least partially taught to LEOs because it keeps their body armor squared up on the most likely threat, which they are shooting at if they draw! It is a stable shooting platform and obviously works well.

The Weaver stance is a bit older, but IMAO makes for a more overall stable defense platform. IOW it allows for a quicker transition into and out of armed defense and unarmed defense. I study American Kenpo, and the Weaver stance is the "neutral" stance from which most of our self defense originates. So it makes integrating that into armed defense much simpler.

You're right, in a Weaver your weak side is slightly in front.
 
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