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When I first saw this post title I was going to reply with "No' it isn't underpowered but it does lack capacity.

Then I saw who posted it and figured that you already know the answer to your question.
 

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Not denying the story, but the image is not accurate. The Japanese plane, the parachutist, and the parachute are the wrong sizes, in relation to each other.

As for the cartridge, well, the Japanese zero was lightly-built, and I have seen what .45 ACP FMJ can do, when shot into motor vehicles, as large as a Ford Econoline van.
 

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The answer to the question is, "No", as long as it is not chambered in anything smaller than .40.
 
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I once seen a fella take out a Sherman with a Colt(Oh I guess it was a movie I saw)Nevermind😁
That's nothing! Rambo brought down a helicopter with a bow!
 
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The truth of this incident has long been in question, for the following reasons:
  • There were no witnesses to this but Baggett and he said at the time he did not believe he hit the Japanese pilot. He thought the pilot had slowed below stall speed to check him out and the pilot lost control. Baggett said he never saw the plane crash.
  • The only account that has Baggett killing the Japanese pilot was the account of a Colonel who was in a prison camp with Baggett, who said that a Japanese intelligence officer who had interrogated him told him about the incident. That sound kind of shaky to me.
  • There is no official report of this incident in either the US or Japanese military records.
  • The first time this incident was reported in print was in 1990 in an Air Force magazine.
  • Accounts of exactly what happened have varied widely over time. Sometimes the story is that the plane was coming straight on to Baggett. Other times, the pilot pulled back the canopy, slowed to just above stall speed and flew by him.
  • Anyone who is familiar with air to air gunnery would tell you this would have been a million to one shot. You have a target moving horizontally at about 80 mph, which is just above stall speed for that plane. You have a shooter dropping horizontally at about 17 mph. So imagine you are shooting at the driver of a car going 80 mph as you are falling after having jumped off a 10 foot platform.
  • The scenario makes no sense. If the Japanese pilot wanted to make sure Baggett was dead, the easiest way to do it would by to just put another burst into him and fly off.
FWIW, the planes the Japanese were using that day were not Zeros, but Nakajima Ki-43's, known to the Japanese as the "Peregrine Falcon," code named "Oscar" by the Allies.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The truth of this incident has long been in question, for the following reasons:
  • The only account that has Baggett killing the Japanese pilot was the account of a Colonel who was in a prison camp with Baggett, who said that a Japanese intelligence officer who had interrogated him told him about the incident. That sound kind of shaky to me.
To me, that gives the story more credibility, not less. From everything I have read, the Japanese felt very superior to us. If a Japanese intelligence officer told the story, I would rank it's reliability quite high.
 

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To me, that gives the story more credibility, not less. From everything I have read, the Japanese felt very superior to us. If a Japanese intelligence officer told the story, I would rank it's reliability quite high.
If he did. It was a third hand anecdote and the Colonel in question did not survive the war. We learned in SERE school that military interrogators do not always tell the truth to the people they interrogate. They also don't share information with those people. They are there to get you to share information and they will tell you anything to loosen you up.
 

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To me the invigorating thing about the story is the fighting spirit demonstrated by the guy with the 45. Even if he missed the shot - he still took it!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If he did. It was a third hand anecdote and the Colonel in question did not survive the war. We learned in SERE school that military interrogators do not always tell the truth to the people they interrogate. They also don't share information with those people. They are there to get you to share information and they will tell you anything to loosen you up.
Point well taken.
 
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Not denying the story, but the image is not accurate. The Japanese plane, the parachutist, and the parachute are the wrong sizes, in relation to each other.

As for the cartridge, well, the Japanese zero was lightly-built, and I have seen what .45 ACP FMJ can do, when shot into motor vehicles, as large as a Ford Econoline van.
You mean it penetrated?
 

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Here's a cool incident that is documented and definitely did happen, for all you air-to-air 1911 fans. On April 25, 1945, a German Fi-145 Storch (stork) unarmed reconnaissance plane was downed by the Allied counterpart of the Storch, an L-4 Grasshopper, the military version of the Piper Cub.

The pilot and co-pilot of the L-4, lieutenants Duane Francis and Bill Martin, flew alongside the Storch and fired at it with their 1911s, wounding one of the German air crew and forcing them to land and surrender. It was one of the last air-to-air engagements of the war.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Here's a cool incident that is documented and definitely did happen, for all you air-to-air 1911 fans. On April 25, 1945, a German Fi-145 Storch (stork) unarmed reconnaissance plane was downed by the Allied counterpart of the Storch, an L-4 Grasshopper, the military version of the Piper Cub.

The pilot and co-pilot of the L-4, lieutenants Duane Francis and Bill Martin, flew alongside the Storch and fired at it with their 1911s, wounding one of the German air crew and forcing them to land and surrender. It was one of the last air-to-air engagements of the war.
Did you hear that story from a German intelligence officer?
 
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