Defensive Carry banner

21 - 40 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Northwest Oregon
Joined
·
16,383 Posts
That’s the only way I’ll own a Ford
My wife and I belonged to a Corvette club in another state. The club was on a Corvette convoy trip over the mountains to another state when a late spring snowstorm hit. We turned around and went back to our city. We discussed it and decided to get our 4X4 vehicles and go on the trip anyway since we had hotel and dinner reservations for the weekend. We were wearing our Corvette club jackets and people were staring at us in our mostly Ford 4X4 pickups.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
A range officer at our Sportmen's Club was shooting both his Colts. A nickel Python & an Officers model Match, both of which were primo examples. He handed me the Officer's Model and told me to take a few shots, with his handloads.
I rested my elbows on the bench and sighted on a 50 yd. target ...1st shot taken and I nailed the X ring.
I put the revolver down , I thanked him, and said that was enough for me , as I did not want to mess up my good day.
The generous guy also drove a well maintained 1998 Ford Truck. (Always stocked with loads of his range gear under the toneau
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Hi BMMcG, I "know" you from the Blue Forum where I use a different screen name.
The answer is: depends. Depends on what you compare a Python to and depends on what you're using it for.
I'd compare it to the Model 27 of old and give the Colt the runner-up position. I prefer the S&W fit, finish, lockwork, and handling qualities. The Python needs more TLC if you're going to use it a lot, with that more-complicated lockwork going out of time if you so much as utter a cuss word in its presence. I had one, a lovely mid-70s 4" blue, and just "normal" monthly qualification (at my old job in the late 70s) caused me to need gunsmithing in less than a year to correct the timing. IMO that's a liability that makes the Colt more of a showpiece than a shooter. I got rid of mine, since at the time, I needed something to fill the holster instead of the 'smith's bank account.
Not to get too philosophical (but why not, right?) everything has it's place in someone's "I need it!" list. If those godawful Glock monstrosities can get their fanboys' saliva going, a nicely-polished vintage Python should at least make some more discerning gun folks very, very happy. Don't ya think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
703 Posts
I first posted this over on Colt Forum, figuring I'd get banned for heresy. Hasn't happened yet, but it's not a popular thread there for sure. Not so much from kinds of comments generated as from lack of comments. Gotta protect the aura so it would seem.

So we'll try it here.

Obviously the market feels the Python is everything it's cracked up to be.

I've been a somewhat skeptical Python owner since day one A decent used 1978 vintage 6-inch blued Python came to roost here in about 2006, before the time when used Python prices increased significantly. It's nice and it's amazingly accurate when I'm in a shooting humor. In a single side-by-side test one afternoon against the other Colt .357 Magnum model I have on hand, the Python shot the tightest group by a very small margin, with both revolvers using the same carefully prepared handload. Different handloads, especially tailored for each revolver and shot on different days might reflect opposite results.

The Python is not my favorite Colt revolver model by a long shot. To me it is somewhat over styled. I am not in favor of full lugs, caring neither for their looks nor their clumsy front heave handling nature. The vent rib is wretched excess in my opinion. Only the very early Pythons have a truly inspiring polish job. The rest made in more recent times seem excessively polished to me. The factory stocks on the later Pythons are frequently pretty plain and their finish brittle and not too durable.

Python craftsmanship lore aside, special burnishing balls passed through bores and all of that, are the Pythons' actions truly more finely crafted than many of their stable mates which were built on the same frame size? I've handled, cycled, and shot a goodly number of Pythons over the years and this 1978 gun feels exactly the same as other Pythons in good condition.

But, there is the Colt 3 5 7 that also roosts in the safe here. It gives up nothing to the Python in action feel. It got whipped by a nose that day both were out for the test, but it's very accurate in its own right. Then there are the Officers Model Match revolvers. They have actions to die for, again not taking a back seat to the Python in this regard. They are more accurate than my Python has been with my best efforts. Their styling appeals to me more than the Python does.

A die hard traditional Smith & Wesson fan, I also enjoy owning the Colts. I use all of 'em too. None are safe queen grade. I'm going to experience them and not save them unused in the safe. I like owning and using the Python, but am not really feeling the special qualities attributed to it. Some of the other Colt models are just as nice and are currently more attainable for less cash outlay.

Has the Python reputation long been a source of a bit of sensationalized leg pulling? Is the Python craftsmanship truly unique? Maybe I'm missing out on something. Y'all can probably straighten me out here with a bit of education.

No need for labeling for it is what it is.


Colt Officers Model Match revolvers with the Colt 3 5 7, the Python's premium immediate predecessor seen at bottom. Supplanted within two years by the Python, the 3 5 7 was allowed to die on the vine after a small eight-year production run. 1953-1961 RIP.


Still think Smith & Wessons are best, the Model 27 being the finest .357 Magnum ever in my book with the Model 19 or its stainless steel counterpart the Model 66 being first rate in every way.
"Is the Colt Python All It's Cracked Up To Be?" Yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,548 Posts
Ive never fired a Colt revolver of any type, and am relatively new to revolvers (been shooting a LCR for about 18 months).

Id love to try one, and the newer Colts that are priced within the realm of reason (I just cant justify spending 4 mortgage payments on a revolver thats functionally identical to any other $400 revolver) definitely interest me. As for criticizing it? Sure. Why not? No gun is perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I've owned my Colt since 1973. I bought it brand new for $262.00, a six-inch, nickel plated handgun. This was my duty gun. I bought the nickel for the intimidation factor (so other people could see it as it was drawn). I only used it twice and it served me well. These days I take it to the range probably once a year, it still shoots like it always did. I've already given my wife instructions to bury the Python with me, I'll be needing it where I'm going.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,069 Posts
I first posted this over on Colt Forum, figuring I'd get banned for heresy. Hasn't happened yet, but it's not a popular thread there for sure. Not so much from kinds of comments generated as from lack of comments. Gotta protect the aura so it would seem.

So we'll try it here.

Obviously the market feels the Python is everything it's cracked up to be.

I've been a somewhat skeptical Python owner since day one A decent used 1978 vintage 6-inch blued Python came to roost here in about 2006, before the time when used Python prices increased significantly. It's nice and it's amazingly accurate when I'm in a shooting humor. In a single side-by-side test one afternoon against the other Colt .357 Magnum model I have on hand, the Python shot the tightest group by a very small margin, with both revolvers using the same carefully prepared handload. Different handloads, especially tailored for each revolver and shot on different days might reflect opposite results.

The Python is not my favorite Colt revolver model by a long shot. To me it is somewhat over styled. I am not in favor of full lugs, caring neither for their looks nor their clumsy front heave handling nature. The vent rib is wretched excess in my opinion. Only the very early Pythons have a truly inspiring polish job. The rest made in more recent times seem excessively polished to me. The factory stocks on the later Pythons are frequently pretty plain and their finish brittle and not too durable.

Python craftsmanship lore aside, special burnishing balls passed through bores and all of that, are the Pythons' actions truly more finely crafted than many of their stable mates which were built on the same frame size? I've handled, cycled, and shot a goodly number of Pythons over the years and this 1978 gun feels exactly the same as other Pythons in good condition.

But, there is the Colt 3 5 7 that also roosts in the safe here. It gives up nothing to the Python in action feel. It got whipped by a nose that day both were out for the test, but it's very accurate in its own right. Then there are the Officers Model Match revolvers. They have actions to die for, again not taking a back seat to the Python in this regard. They are more accurate than my Python has been with my best efforts. Their styling appeals to me more than the Python does.

A die hard traditional Smith & Wesson fan, I also enjoy owning the Colts. I use all of 'em too. None are safe queen grade. I'm going to experience them and not save them unused in the safe. I like owning and using the Python, but am not really feeling the special qualities attributed to it. Some of the other Colt models are just as nice and are currently more attainable for less cash outlay.

Has the Python reputation long been a source of a bit of sensationalized leg pulling? Is the Python craftsmanship truly unique? Maybe I'm missing out on something. Y'all can probably straighten me out here with a bit of education.

No need for labeling for it is what it is.


Colt Officers Model Match revolvers with the Colt 3 5 7, the Python's premium immediate predecessor seen at bottom. Supplanted within two years by the Python, the 3 5 7 was allowed to die on the vine after a small eight-year production run. 1953-1961 RIP.


Still think Smith & Wessons are best, the Model 27 being the finest .357 Magnum ever in my book with the Model 19 or its stainless steel counterpart the Model 66 being first rate in every way.
^^I agree completely!^^ I have shot several vintage Pythons over the years although I have never owned one. They were all great shooters although one had a timing issue. I do have a 1973 Diamondback .38 spl. which is essentially the Pythons little brother. It is a sweet gun but... My 1982 Dan Wesson 15-2 has a better trigger and ergonomics for me and consequently is more accurate than the Colt, in my hands! (The Diamondback is no slouch in the accuracy department!) I like Pythons, I just question paying a lot more when there are other revolvers out there that are just as good or better for less money. Just my .02 worth!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rock and Glock

·
Registered
Joined
·
36,177 Posts
If it weren't for Starsky and Hutch, the Python would merely be a has been. I am fond of the looks, but not at those prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,580 Posts
I think the older ones are fine looking weapons. However, I'm not partial to owning one of them.

If I want a nice looking older revolver, I can spend time looking for a S&W or Ruger for less money. I also prefer the look of the Ruger Security Six and some of the older S&Ws over the Colt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,330 Posts
they are indeed everything they are reported to be. Smooth operating firearms. Well made.

Are they worth the prices they charge? Well. to me I guess they are. But they are pricey for sure. However many other high end revolvers are in that price range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
My first gun, ever, was a Colt Python! At the time, I had no idea what I was buying. My friend got me into shooting and later, reloading. Then one day he said, come with me, I found a pistol you should buy. We went at lunch time and I looked at a revolver and had no idea what I was buying but I trusted him. This was back in 1981. What I ended up buying was a pristine 1963 Colt Python, like new. $375 with a custom S&W holster that fit like a glove.

I ended up shooting it like it was just another revolver. For a long time, I'd reload and go out shooting ~ 200-300 rds of .357 each time. I had no idea what a Python was back then. I thought all revolvers were like this. I never knew it was hand assembled by craftsmen. Only sensible thing I did was take care of it. I didn't baby it, but I took care of it. It has thousands of rounds through it and it is still in time. I've never had a problem with it. And it's accurate... And FUN to shoot! Out of everything I've been able to shoot, it still has the best trigger. Coming in 2nd is a like new mid-50s Sig P210, which in itself, is something else!

So, yeah, for me the Python has been everything it is cracked up to be. I know there are other pistols/revolvers out there that are better made, more accurate, etc... But this was my first "pistol" and it's a quality piece from a time long ago when it was hand-assembled, so it's special. Love it. Never going to part with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Overrated? Not sure, but the prices have definitely become inflated. I don't think that is the fault of Colt though. Very expensive so I make do with other Colt DA models. They shoot just as nicely and I don't have to pay as much for them. Works for me. When I find myself with a spare $1,500 I'll either buy a new one or a used one. However I'm not sure when that mythical time will arrive. Now it's picture time.
334556
334557
334558
334559
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,428 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
Well CPhillip, I'm envious. I'd still like to say I've purchased a new Colt double-action revolver.
 
21 - 40 of 40 Posts
Top