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That story may have been embellished if only to mean more to me, and serve as a reminder to share, but I still remember the idea of a bunch of muddy scrambled eggs, shells and all, going wasted in the worst of circumstances.
Might have also served to teach not to put all your eggs in one....basket...pot...er...helmet! :danceban:

Great story.:smile:
 

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One of my old college professors was on one of the ships that was part of the Japanese surrender force fleet.

According to him they made dock and after the surrender he happened to be on the lucky side of the ship that got liberty. The first thing they managed to do was find an abandoned sake wagon. Don't have to tell y'all the results there. Next they started "finding" trophies. He was the ships bugler and found some Jap bugles.

They made it back to the ship mostly intact.

The next day the CO started confiscating all the trophies and piled them on the fore deck in a Huge pile that grew for days. They continued looking for contraband for several days until the CO finally admitted defeat and allowed that everyone would be allowed to keep a trophy but only one and asked them to please turn in the others. My ole prof had polished up his trophies and hung them on his wall with his USGI bugles and they never looked twice at them.

RIP Chief(Gene Witherspoon - head of the music department at Arkansas Tech University) you left this world too soon and yet you touched So many lives.
 

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Have been privileged to know a number of WWII veterans. Everyone of them had a story to tell even if they didn't talk.

The pilot who spent the last year of the war in a Japanese POW camp. The only story he ever told was of watching the mushroom cloud from the first bomb.
The mechanic from 1st Armor whose closest adventure to combat was 20 miles behind the line in a wrecker getting shot at by some Panzers that weren't supposed to be there. He wouldn't walk through the meat department at the grocery because it brought back visions of the inside of knocked out tanks.
The Navy corpsman who became a Pediatrician so "...I could continue patching kids back together."

Like I said before, we owe more than can ever be repaid.
 

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Not tired at all, @OldChap. I just got goosebumps.



@rstickle may shed some light on the veracity of this account, but my Father indicated he and a group of "engineers or what-have-yous" would go out on EOD Disposal sorties at night before attempted advances. I truly don't know or understand the details of what was done, but as he related it, they often stumbled onto / into barns, chicken coops, and the like, and occasionally "liberated" a few eggs or chickens or what have you. As the team consisted of many men, at the end of the night they'd move to the rear, and share the "prizes" of the night with each other.
My take on this would be that your Father may have been a Combat Engineer. It sounds like something they would be tasked with. Clearing lanes through mine fields at night in preparation for advances the next morning. Now, Combat Engineers and EOD (Bomb Disposal as they were known back then), were two different jobs, although both had the capability of handling mines and booby traps. But EOD also handled all other types of explosive ordnance... Something the Engineers did NOT do. Also the Engineers usually took the lead in mine field clearance, oddly enough because EOD was considered too valuable to "waste" since there were so few, and took a lot longer to train, since they had to know ALL ordnance (like their lives depended on it. :wink:)

I do know that a couple of EOD units did land on the beaches on D-Day, but as far as I know offhand, none with the first wave. For the rest of the war Army EOD took the lead in all US land based explosive activities except mine field clearance activities. Saying that remember back then "Army" included Army and Air Force, since the split between the two services didn't occur till 1947.
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
^^^^^^^ That kind of agrees with his stories about chicken coops and "liberating" eggs at night. :rofl:

The best part of working at night he said, was returning to the rear in the morning (with or without eggs) and sleeping through the fighting. Said, as usual, in his guarded fashion.

Thank you, Rick.
 

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Thanks Rock and Glock.

An uncle by marriage was in the second wave at Omaha Beach. Another uncle by marriage was an assault boat driver at Omaha Beach.

My first cousin, Forrest Armentrout, was assigned to the 502 PIR, 101st Airborne Division. Forrest survived the D-Day invasion and Market Garden. He was KIA at the Battle of The Bulge.

West Virginia Veterans Memorial - Forrest William Armentrout

George Berry, my US Army EOD buddy, was with the Canadian army in WWII. He was in the first wave to hit Juno Beach.

Our part of WV lost several soldiers in the invasion. i remember the funerals we attended while Dad was in the US Navy.
 

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Discussion Starter #48 (Edited)
I thought I’d renew this old post due to the dates. Trump will be at Normandy tomorrow.

Great men, great actions, bravery and strength of character.

Rest In Peace warriors.

Thank you.
 

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I could just kick myself for not going across the channel when I was stationed in London in the mid-70's. I wasn't exactly rich enough to go traveling around Europe back then anyway. I probably would've got lost and ended up with an Article 15 or worse.
 

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'Many men came here as soldiers
Many men will pass this way,
Many men will count the hours
As they live the longest day.

Many men are tired and weary
Many men are here to stay,
Many men won't see the sunset
When it ends the longest day.

The longest day the longest day
This will be the longest day,
Filled with hopes and filled with fears
Filled with blood and sweat and tears.

Many men the mighty thousands
Many men to victory,
Marching on right into battle
In the longest day in history."

Paul Anka


This song from the movie, The Longest Day, always gets me. God bless these men and thank God they were there and did what they did. Many men. Many scared and brave men who lunged into the jaws of the Hun and drove him out. Many men. Thank you oh Lord for those Many men.
 

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Thanks. Great photos.

My family and I always watch President Reagan's speech on June 6, 1984 on this day. Stirring words.


So sad to see so many of those brave vets gone home. Both of ours have. We will never forget.
Thank you for sharing this. I didn't know about this speech from President Reagan. You hit the nail on the head. Stirring words, indeed.
 

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Another place to check out if you are stateside is the National D-Day Memorial in Bedford, VA. My father (deceased 2002) was in WWII but not the D-Day operation but my family and I decided to visit the memorial on opening day. I'm very glad I made the trip. You can feel a difference in the air when you step into the memorial. You can actually feel this place is sacred. If you plan a trip next year to honor D-Day or WWII soldiers please consider the National D-Day Memorial in Bedford. You will not be disappointed.
It does have quite a feeling to it. We were not able to attend the opening day but took my son a few years ago and we all enjoyed the visit.
 
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