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Ours has a round butt, but also a filler between the grip and the triggerguard. We both like that form the best, due to concealment issues, but neither of us like the twisty recoil motion that a J-Frame shortie imparts.

We started with the S&W-standard, walnut-grip round butt. Then we added a Tyler T-Grip adapter. Next, we bought grips which did the same thing, without the additional adapter. Those worked best.

But we also tried a gimmick. Somebody (don't remember who) makes J-Frame grips that are almost triangular in profile (side view). We got them from the Dillon Blue Press catalog. Strange thing: They work pretty well: much less of that in-the-hand recoil twist. You might try them, since they're not expensive.

But we still prefer the small, rubber-ish, middle-finger-filler grips that we bought. We use something similar on Jean's Charter Arms snubbie, too.
 
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Ours has a round butt, but also a filler between the grip and the triggerguard. We both like that form the best, due to concealment issues, but neither of us like the twisty recoil motion that a J-Frame shortie imparts.

We started with the S&W-standard, walnut-grip round butt. Then we added a Tyler T-Grip adapter. Next, we bought grips which did the same thing, without the additional adapter. Those worked best.

But we also tried a gimmick. Somebody (don't remember who) makes J-Frame grips that are almost triangular in profile (side view). We got them from the Dillon Blue Press catalog. Strange thing: They work pretty well: much less of that in-the-hand recoil twist. You might try them, since they're not expensive.

But we still prefer the small, rubber-ish, middle-finger-filler grips that we bought. We use something similar on Jean's Charter Arms snubbie, too.
But what is your preference for a K-frame?
 

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On k-frames, square butt with a Tyler T-grip.

J-frames? Round conceals better.
 
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Inherited a 4" S&W Model 10 a while back. Have done a ton of shooting with my LCR, and thats 99% of my revolver shooting experience. Going from the pocket snub, its wayyyy easier to shoot than the K frame with the square grips. Even with light wadcutters, it was still coming out of my hand. Replaced it with some rubber grips (I think Hogue) and its now a usable gun.
 

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Square butt. My first snub nose was a very used Mod 36 square butt.
 

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Which do you prefer and why?
I prefer the way the round carries, but I prefer the way the square feels in the hand.

So for carry, I figure I'll spend far more time carrying than shooting, so round it is.

For a range plinker, a square will do just fine.
 

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Square butt. Better grip for my hands.---Sturgis
 

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I have shot a round butt far more so it appears to fit better in my hand. I have considered a set of round to square grip to give them an honest try
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I can live with either, but a round butt with Tyler T grip just feels right.
 
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FIFY

Do they offer a pear-shaped butt?
For BadBob sized hands this is more to the point.


I'd love to have an opinion on square butt versus round butt K-Frame Smith & Wessons, but I've never been able to make up my mind between them.

I've shot a lot of rounds out of K-Frame Smith & Wessons, way more rounds through them than any other firearm I've ever owned. I've used square butt K-Frame Smith & Wessons since the mid 1970s, experienced my first handling and shooting a round butt K- Frame Smith & Wesson in the early 1980s when my sister purchased a new 4-inch Model 10 Heavy Barrel with round butt configuration as a Christmas present to my brother-in-law back before they even married. I've also owned round butt K-Frames for several decades. I shoot square butt K-Frames way more than I do the round butt K-Frames and always have. Despite square butt familiarity I can't really discern a preference or develop a hard and fast opinion. The round butt configuration when equipped with factory service stocks feels just as intuitive to me as the more familiar square butt and I feel I can handle both with equal facility. I would never abide any style of rubber stocks on a K-Frame Smith & Wesson.

Here are the same ol' "usual suspects" photos posted here on the Forum on occasion of the round butt Smith & Wessons on hand.

There was a time, before introduction of the square butt grip frame in 1905, when you could have any butt style K-Frame Smith & Wesson you wanted as long as it was round. This 1904 vintage K-Frame .38 Special possesses the original round butt grip frame configuration, same as modern round butt K-Frame models today. One could mix and match stocks from any of the K-frames here and they will interchange. The hard Vulcanized rubber stocks feel good to grasp, but are more slippery to handle, especially if hands are wet or sweaty. The original equipment stocks would have to be changed out for checkered walnut if serious totin' was contemplated.



I love the feel of the stocks on this World War I vintage 4-inch K-Frame .38 Special best of all the round butt models here. Round, finely checkered, and just a bit more hand filling in exterior dimensions, it's really cozy in my hands. I think these stocks are really good lookin' too.



This K-Frame Model 10 .38 Special was acquired brand new in January of 1996 after being special ordered some months before, one of the last of the 2-inch Model 10s produced. Stocks are the Dymondwood laminated style that were ordered to go with the revolver which had to be special ordered at the time in order to get the 2-inch barrel. Smith & Wesson's custom shop offered these style stocks in the 1990s that could be purchased as factory accessories. They are slightly less hand filling for me than the factory round butt walnut stocks provided on that 1917-1919 vintage revolver above, but this doesn't affect my handling and shooting of the revolver.



K-Frame Magnums. The 2 1/2-inch Model 66 and 3-inch Model 13 offer greater recoil with full powered loads, but for me are still cozy and comfortable to shoot with their factory walnut stocks which possess the same external dimensions as those stocks on the 2-inch Model 10. The K-Frame Magnums, whether round but or square butt, offer enough weight to tame 357 Magnum, even for rapid repeat shots. I never felt inclined to replace the stocks. In fact I like the traditional factory stocks best of all for a usin' revolver.


I'm adaptable and don't place so much significance on how a gun "feels." Nobody else in the handgun world feels this way, but how it feels at the gun shop counter is of somewhat less importance to me than it is to most people. I have preferences and some I don't prefer, but I'll become accustomed to most anything with some practice with it.

I'm sure BadBob's got me whipped on size of hands, but I have fairly large hands and long fingers. I can reach a 9.5 inch span, meaning that with my thumb on middle C on a piano keyboard I can comfortably reach beyond an octave to E, a total span of 10 keys.

Here's my ol' favorite Model 10 Heavy Barrel lying in my opened hand.


I used my favorite ol' Model 10 Heavy Barrel with its square butt for over 30 years and was all fat, dumb, and happy before trying it out with a Tyler T-Grip. I used to buy, sell and trade K-Frame Model 10s on occasion for fun and profit. I once thought grip adapters were so ugly that I even removed one from an acquired revolver and threw it away. This photo is dated form 2008. I had just tried a T-Grip then and found it made a good grip even better. Also felt like a doofus for not giving the T-Grip a meaningful test before. Double-action control is enhanced for me with the T-Grip and double-action accuracy is better. I thought the factory square butt was familiar in my hand and comfortable like a worn pair of jeans. Still, it was a measurable improvement to shoot the Model 10 with the T-Grip. I still think they are hideous looking.





I feel the same way about rubber grips on revolvers and won't abide them. They're plug ugly. They get tacky and sticky. They even smell bad. Rubber grips are more clingy on clothing. Of course they are also more clingy in one's hands which is the reason most like them, but I can do without rubber grips.

I'd love to find a source for cheap used Tyler T-Grips for round butt K-Frames for I'd equip some of my round butt K-Frames with them. Just as they do the square butt K-Frame, the round butt T-Grip is sure to be a benefit to shooting and perhaps control, especially on the K-Frame Magnums.
 

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Um, I have no clue what a j-frame, k-frame, or n-frame is. However, I have never tried a round grip on a revolver. The butts on my revolvers are square. I do wish they were a bit bigger, however.
 

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Round fits my hand better. I wear a medium in gloves, which is probably considered to be smaller than average.
 

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I feel the same way about rubber grips on revolvers and won't abide them. They're plug ugly. They get tacky and sticky. They even smell bad. Rubber grips are more clingy on clothing. Of course they are also more clingy in one's hands which is the reason most like them, but I can do without rubber grips.
I put a set of Pachmayr grips on my .41 Mag Blackhawk. Everyone said they were better than the smoot Ruger grips. They lied! Used them for one shooting session and put the wood grips back on. They about ripped the skin loose on my shooting hand.
 

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Um, I have no clue what a j-frame, k-frame, or n-frame is. However, I have never tried a round grip on a revolver. The butts on my revolvers are square. I do wish they were a bit bigger, however.
Refers to the various frame sizes which were used to make a number of Smith & Wesson revolvers of swing-out cylinder design and chambered in a host of different cartridges over the years.

Top to bottom: J-Frame, K-Frame, and N-Frame, all from the early to mid 1950s and all these are chambered for .38 Special. Top: Chiefs Special, later to be known as the Model 36, middle: Military & Police, later to be known as the Model 10, Bottom: Heavy Duty, later to be known as the Model 20.



List of all the frame sizes of Smith & Wesson swing-out cylinder revolvers produced since their inception in 1896.
I-Frame- Small frame, introduced in 1896 for .32 caliber cartridges. Discontinued in favor of the J-Frame.
J-Frame - Small frame, introduced in 1950, a lengthened and strengthened I-Frame to allow for use with .38 Special
K-Frame - Medium frame, introduced in 1899 with the .38 Special and similar medium revolver cartridges.
L-Frame - Medium frame, slightly larger than K-Frame, introduced in 1980 especially for .357 Magnum.
M-Frame - Tiny frame, smaller than J-Frame, introduced in 1902 for .22 rim fire and produced until 1921.
N-Frame - Large frame, introduced in 1907 for large .44 and .45 caliber revolver cartridges.
X-Frame - Jumbo frame, introduced in 2003 for the .460 and .500 Smith & Wesson cartridges.

C-Frame - Intermediate small frame, experimentally developed by Smith & Wesson in 1975 to provide a 6-shot .38 revolver more compact than the K-Frame to compete with Colt's Detective Special. Seems like it would have been a good idea, but apparently didn't work out because of of a curious offset cylinder stop arrangement. 5000 were said to have been made, none were released and most destroyed by the factory. It's said that perhaps 20 survive. Here's a photo pulled off the internet of a surviving example.
 
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