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Has anyone ever rebuilt a gun that had a catastrophic failure or a kaboom? I see images of kabooms and think that sometimes the frames can still be salvaged.
 

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I think that would be a dubious way to start a build. The only way I would pursue that is if a rigorous dimensional inspection and comparison with design dimensions showed no evidence of deformation, and an X-ray or MPI showed no evidence of cracks. If the consumer or gunsmith had to pay the going rates for such inspections, it would be cheaper to buy a new gun - or two.
 

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I would not as the barrel and the frame etc is bad and who know what else happened to it
 

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I saw one kaboom where a new reloader thought that since 2400 and Bullseye looked the same they would be interchangeable. He loaded 22gr Bullseye behind a 240gr 44mag, needless to say the results were spectacular. The top chamber was totally blown out and the two adjacent chambers were split. The local gunsmith sent it back to Ruger, the frame was not affected and they replaced the cylinder and returned the revolver good as new.
 

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I think that would be a dubious way to start a build. The only way I would pursue that is if a rigorous dimensional inspection and comparison with design dimensions showed no evidence of deformation, and an X-ray or MPI showed no evidence of cracks. If the consumer or gunsmith had to pay the going rates for such inspections, it would be cheaper to buy a new gun - or two.


Smear a little JB Weld and ... fixed ... good as new.
NO, but I have had one "catastrophic" failure...wasn't any rebuilding that one.

But, there was a refreshing of my drawers...:yup:
I saw one kaboom where a new reloader thought that since 2400 and Bullseye looked the same they would be interchangeable. He loaded 22gr Bullseye behind a 240gr 44mag, needless to say the results were spectacular. The top chamber was totally blown out and the two adjacent chambers were split. The local gunsmith sent it back to Ruger, the frame was not affected and they replaced the cylinder and returned the revolver good as new.
I was in a gun shop when someone came in and was about to buy smokeless powder for his muzzle loader because that powder was black. Good thing he said it was for a front stufer! He asked if 90 gr would be enough!

On another occasion a newby reloader asked if he could use this powder instead of the one that was out of stock because they "looked" the same. Without sparing his feelings, he was abruptly told no, and either get an education or stop reloading.

To answer the OP's question, no, I would not rebuild under any circumstances.
 

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The local gunsmith sent it back to Ruger, the frame was not affected and they replaced the cylinder and returned the revolver good as new.
Ruger got a "Show and Tell" piece.

That is a good warranty.
 

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I have to wonder if they have a back room, "we can't make this stuff up" display board!
I am sure they do. Many manufacturers have one.
 

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Has anyone ever rebuilt a gun that had a catastrophic failure or a kaboom? I see images of kabooms and think that sometimes the frames can still be salvaged.
No, they are usually not worth the time and expense.

I would suggest instead buying a police trade-in in fair condition as a parts gun, something inexpensive to practice on. Very often these will still have some life in them.

Metal Alloy Frames are more difficult to detect small fractures in the frame. Polymer frames don't crack but can deform some. Usually they are a safer bet if you go with anything that has had the barrel blow up.
 

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I wouldn't. Really, is it really worth the risk to save a few pennies? The only way I would even consider shooting a firearm that has had a catastrophic failure is if it was rebuilt by the factory with a vested interest in NOT being sued and will take steps to make sure it actually is in working order and not structurally compromised.
 

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I think that would be a dubious way to start a build. The only way I would pursue that is if a rigorous dimensional inspection and comparison with design dimensions showed no evidence of deformation, and an X-ray or MPI showed no evidence of cracks. If the consumer or gunsmith had to pay the going rates for such inspections, it would be cheaper to buy a new gun - or two.
^^^^^ This, EXACTLY this ^^^^^
 
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