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Purchased my first Kahr today and wondered if anyone had done a melt job on the slide? Filing, sanding, then polishing would be a labor of love project. Looks like it just asks for the modification. Thankfully it is stainless.
 

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I don't know about the slide, but you can probably melt the frame in the oven... :rofl:
 

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I have done a melt job on my Kahrs (CW9, PM9 and K9) Using 800 grit emory cloth I rounded the edges at the rear of the frame, the slide release and the trigger guard on the PM and CW9s. Also sanded down the "knobs" on the front of the grip and put skateboard tape on the area. Did the same to slide release and trigger guard on the K9.
 

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Be sure to let us see it when you're done... I may have to do it to my CW9....
 

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Really didn't do anything that would show up well in pictures, even if I could do that with my limited ability with a camera. All I did was gently break the sharp edges and round the corners. I like the Kahrs, as you can tell, but they do come stock with some pretty sharp edges. I rounded the left rear of the frame of the CW and PM because it was impacting the base of the thumb during recoil. I smoothed the right side of the trigger guards just to help my trigger finger slip into the guard a little easier. The pimples on the front of the grip would dig into my fingers and really did not seem to keep the CW or PM for twisting slightly under recoil. The skateboard tape solved that nicely.
 

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What was the sharpest edge on your CW9? I have mine out of the holster at the moment and the sharpest edge is the very front of the slide. Everything else is nicely beveled or radiused.
 

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I've never tried this on a Kahr, but did do it to a S&W 4506 with very good results. I initially used a fine cutting file and smoothed it out with several grits of aluminum oxide paper, starting with 80 and working up to 1200. The only problem you may have is that the surface metal has a matte finish and any area you sand/file will be bright. This might require bead blasting to get a uniform appearance, if cosmetics are a factor.
 

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There is really no need to go to a Full Melt.
I think the full melt jobs really sort of ruin the nice lines of a firearm.

Just my personal opinion...that it looks much nicer if you just "break" the hard, sharp, edges.

On a Stainless slide you can do that yourself if you are decently good with your hands.

Take a good quality fine new double cut file and use that to break the hard edges.
You just take your time and file a nice even "flat" on the sharp edges.

Then take a small block of flat hardwood...glue an exactly sized piece of smooth leather to that little hardwood block and tightly wrap it with some fine 3M "Wet Or Dry" paper (Try 600 Grit) and then just carefully smooth over your file cuts.

That looks really nice.

Do a light edge break first. You'll probably be quite happy with that.
Especially when your gun does not "shave" Kydex or leather every time you draw your weapon and reholster.

You can always go back with the file and deepen the flats or do some careful rounding if you want more of a "full melt" look & then do the 3M paper again starting with more of a coarse paper.

You really can't "mess up" and as long as you don't go crazy removing metal you can always send it off to a pro to do a "full melt" job which will negate anything that you did goof up.

But, really if you just take your time, you can't mess up.
 

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I have a gray, 6" diameter "ScothBrite" wheel on a bench grinder left over from my airplane building days. I've used it successfully to "dehorn" several stainless steel handguns over the last few years. This wheel is soft and leaves a polished finish with no other touching up required.

On my CW9, the slide stop really dug into my thumb. I polished the stop down to where it was very rounded and smoothed. The "facets" on the slide were very sharp and the pistol did dig in a bit when holstering in my Kydex holster. It now holsters very smoothly. I probably spent a total of 5 minutes on the CW9 to achieve the results I was after.

I just sold my Ruger SP101 revolver to a good friend. I'd done a dehorn on it but never mentioned it and he couldn't tell---until he picked up a new one in a gun shop. He told me the other day that new Ruger in the shop had lots of sharp corners (especially the trigger and trigger guard) and he was really impressed with the Ruger that I sold him.

The main point from the above is that you don't have to do work that is obvious to derive benefits.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
QKShooter loved the holster shave comment! Too funny. I decided to use a fine file and break the sharp edges and then went over those with some fine sandpaper. Nice change to feel but not much to see different. I too smoothed my SP101 a bit and loved the change. Seemed more "friendly" then. Thanks for all the feedback.
 
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