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From what I understand, cops shoot quite the number of armed homeowners for the same reason. We don't get stats on that because they are categorised as good shoots and that's it.

Yes - know your target. If you call the cops, hunker down and hide until they announce themselves. Then get up - unarmed. Geez :(
 

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From the article:

"The report indicates he retrieved a shotgun and fired through a window, striking the officers."

Never a good plan, unless they are getting ready to launch a Molotov.
 

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Detroit, 19 year old shoots two police responding to burglar call at his home, one critical.

Teenage resident mistakes two officers for burglars, shooting them during response - Law Enforcement Today
I would agree to know your target, however without actually knowing all the facts or being there it's hard to say what may have happened. I don't want to say one way or the other for that reason at who is at fault as I was not there and probably could never know what was going through everyone's minds, I would like to know if the cops identified themselves though?
 

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Fear can (and does) override common sense in many situations. I can only hope my "defensive awareness" mindset is stronger than my fear if and when the time comes.

I hope the guy doesn't get hit too hard over it.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

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Maybe one of the more knowledgeable retired officers will chime in here, but in our department, we worked closely with the 911 Center to make sure the subject stayed on the phone until the officers arrived on scene. That enabled a two way sharing of critical information about where the person inside was, and where the officers outside were. The 911 operator/dispatcher always informed the caller when the cavalry was on-scene and asked them to lay down any weapons because officers were about to make contact. That policy always seemed like common sense to me.
 

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Like I said, I don't know, I wasn't there, with 3 calls from that house that day you would think they would be a bit worried about what all was going on in the premises. Especially if someone could have been outside trying to get in. I agree with you it sounds like a no win scenario and it could very well have been we don't know what was going on in that kid or the cops minds. I was not laying blame it was a question that came to mind...
 
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Maybe one of the more knowledgeable retired officers will chime in here, but in our department, we worked closely with the 911 Center to make sure the subject stayed on the phone until the officers arrived on scene. That enabled a two way sharing of critical information about where the person inside was, and where the officers outside were. The 911 operator/dispatcher always informed the caller when the cavalry was on-scene and asked them to lay down any weapons because officers were about to make contact. That policy always seemed like common sense to me.
This is all I'm asking but you never know the call could have been made with a cell phone that kept going dead? there are just too many unknowns with this scenario and even if we asked all the right questions, in my experience the media always seems to sensationalize and or crew up key facts to make it more news worthy so we probably will never know unless someone who investigated it or was on the jury actually tells us what happened.
 

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This is all I'm asking but you never know the call could have been made with a cell phone that kept going dead? there are just too many unknowns with this scenario and even if we asked all the right questions, in my experience the media always seems to sensationalize and or crew up key facts to make it more news worthy so we probably will never know unless someone who investigated it or was on the jury actually tells us what happened.
True. Media reports are about 1/2 as accurate as eyewitness reports, which are notoriously bad! I've listened as a Dept. spokesperson gave details, and then read the printed recounting of media and
 

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Would be interesting to know when the various calls were made that day and if police had previously responded, or if this was multiple calls for the same incident.

During a break in I called 911 multiple times since they disconnected me...twice. Then even while I was on line with the dispatcher the cops burst in through my already busted open door without having dispatch tell me they were there and coming in. The responding officers were impressed with my trigger discipline and ability to detain the intruder without shooting, and very pleased I also did not shoot them since I had been told to not expect police for another 10-15 minutes. Cops responding to situations like this are often trusting their lives to good communication through 911, but it can fail miserably.
 

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I am a retired LEO and our call takers try to keep people on the line, but they sometimes hang up, or get disconnected. Reguardless, unless he could identify the people he was shooting at, he should not have been shooting.
 

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Maybe one of the more knowledgeable retired officers will chime in here, but in our department, we worked closely with the 911 Center to make sure the subject stayed on the phone until the officers arrived on scene. That enabled a two way sharing of critical information about where the person inside was, and where the officers outside were. The 911 operator/dispatcher always informed the caller when the cavalry was on-scene and asked them to lay down any weapons because officers were about to make contact. That policy always seemed like common sense to me.
It could be that the mom was on the phone with 911 while the son was arming himself. She may not have known he was armed or didn't think to mention it.
 

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Part of our home SD protocol is for the wife to stay on the cell phone with 911 in the safe room until the incident is completely over and the entire home is secured.

If you don't have a planned protocol...best create one and practice it at least once. That way nobody has to give orders when you might have less than a minute to react.
 
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Maybe one of the more knowledgeable retired officers will chime in here, but in our department, we worked closely with the 911 Center to make sure the subject stayed on the phone until the officers arrived on scene. That enabled a two way sharing of critical information about where the person inside was, and where the officers outside were. The 911 operator/dispatcher always informed the caller when the cavalry was on-scene and asked them to lay down any weapons because officers were about to make contact. That policy always seemed like common sense to me.
>>>> last year when we had a false alarm at 2 am or so, we held on the phone and the 911 operator told us when police had pulled up, asked how we were dressed, where we were, and instructed us to put our weapons down. I thought the process went very smoothly and safely, and was appropriate for the scenario we thought (incorrectly) what was happening.
 

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911 operator didn't keep the kid on the phone? Didn't inform leo's were on scene?

Their SOP's are lacking or the dispatcher mucked it up and is guilty of nonfeasance and misfeasance.
 

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This is all I'm asking but you never know the call could have been made with a cell phone that kept going dead? there are just too many unknowns with this scenario and even if we asked all the right questions, in my experience the media always seems to sensationalize and or crew up key facts to make it more news worthy so we probably will never know unless someone who investigated it or was on the jury actually tells us what happened.
What a novel approach: withholding opining without having all the facts. I like it. I like it.
 

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>>>> last year when we had a false alarm at 2 am or so, we held on the phone and the 911 operator told us when police had pulled up, asked how we were dressed, where we were, and instructed us to put our weapons down. I thought the process went very smoothly and safely, and was appropriate for the scenario we thought (incorrectly) what was happening.
just speaking for myself, If I feel danger is afoot.. I am not going to remain on the phone when I should be paying close attention to what is potentially happening in my home. I will call 911 ask for help, apprise them of what I think is going on, verify my location and then I am laying the phone down(open line). I have know idea why this goofball fired at someone outside his home but that's on him. I hope the officers recover quickly
 
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