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Leather sap fighting techniques

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I have consulted with a lawyer, various lecturers at my university (a security and pre police force and intelligence training institute) and been over both my state laws, regulations and the federal customs act. Batons are regulated, the comtech stinger is prohibited both at an import and state carry level, and due to recent events in my city, police are zero tolerance on knives. Due to a section of the weapons legislation in my state, anything carried with the intent of it being used as a weapon is a dangerous article. If the police, for any reason, suspect you of carrying a weapon, they can search you. You MUST have a VERY GOOD reason for carrying a knife of any description or your in for a bit of jail time. The courts in my town do not mess around with knives.

One of the few viable self defence weapons I've been able to locate that doesn't fall under the definition of a prohibited weapon is a lead filled soft sap. Because I can use it as a massage tool, I could carry it without fear of a charge.

So, aside from the obvious 'aim for the head and hope to cause unconsciousness' or targetting the sciatic nerve, what fighting techniques could I employ?
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
gregarat, any double edged knife or a push knife (regardless of size) carried on the person in my state is automatically a prohibited weapon. Count out most tactical knives right there. Also, if push comes to shove and lethal force is necessary, I'm confident in my defensive tactics training that I could do so without weapons. Try telling a court in this country that you used a knife, that you just happened to be carrying, to stab and or slash a person in self defence, and you will most likely be laughed all the way to jail.

Just from a practicality perspective, and because I have to retain a very visual presence at my job, a cane isn't an option. That's not to say we don't keep one behind the door at home (for my old man, his a big fella and the cane helps :D). It'd also open me up to more attacks (cane could be perceived as an indication of frailty) and in the real fighting situations I've seen/been involved in, retention of weapons such as bats and medium length steel bars gets difficult, especially against someone with intermediate martial arts training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A black jack, a rigid item that's clearly a weapon, would be a no no. But a sap, a round sap (not the flat type, again clearly a weapon in Australian LE eyes) could well be a massage tool. Plus, due to cultural differences (We suckle at the UK's colonial teat), the sap/blackjack was never an LE weapon and as such is not a familiar item here. We went with the straight wooden stick, UK bobby style, until upgrading to ASPs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the help guys.

QK, just on the issue of maglites, I made a post in another section, but anyway, in Australia, maglites contain the a note in the instructions which reads 'not an impact tool'. One of my Law lecturers (also my security cert trainer) has had to defend many a patrol security officer confronted with an 'offenders on premises' situation and used the maglite as self defence.

Basically, what is will boil down to is excessive force, because you are, in effect, striking the offender with a lead filled pipe. Defence lawyers will seize on it at the offender's trial, and the police will happily prosecute you for its use. I should further point out that in my state, a conviction for ANY assault (except absolute bottom of the ladder 'unlawful assault') will see you barred, without recourse, from the private security industry for 10 years. A finding of guilt without a conviction sees you out for 5.
 
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