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Discussion Starter #1
I am just wondering if it is safe to load less than the minimun powder gr.? assuming the following are done correctly.
1. oal is withing specs.
2. brass is in good shape.

I am looking at starting at 90% of minimum and working my way up.
thanks in advance
 

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90% of minimum may result in a squib, I wouldn't do it, the minimum is there for a reason.

In a semi-auto or revolver? If using a semi, you will probably need to change the recoil spring for proper operation.
exactally correct. The minimum is usually an indication of proper operation and expansion of bullet (if applicable)

Might I ask the reason you would want less charge in the round you are building?
 

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If after lower energy loads look at the various powder types and select a load that is within chart limits but yields lower velocities.
 

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I have done it when I wanted a very light load. Unless one goes much below the minimum I would not think a squib was likely, and failure to cycle the action would be the higher probability.

Caution is always the word when handloading.

Regards,
Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have a 155gr. raniere tmj bullet. raniere says to use leade cast recipes. I cant find any rcipes for this aprticular bullet in a published book. any advice short of getting different bullets.
 

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I don't worry about using lead data. I use relatively light loads and use what the powder manufacturer shows in the book.

Are you using a .40 S&W?

Regards,
Jerry
 

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yes .40 S&W. looking for recipe for raniere plated 155 gr flat nose.
I would go to the handbooks, select the minimum load for jacketed bullets of that weight and go from there.
I suspect that plated bullets cannot handle the top velocities of jacketed bullets withoug the plating coming off and accuracy suffering. I don't know that, but think that is the case.

I have loaded thousands of the Ranier plated bullets, and use the loads for jacketed bullets of the same weight. I do not use near max loads as they are for range use.

Regards,
Jerry
 

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I would not recomend going below minimum loads.

Rule of thumb for plated bullets is to use lead bullet data for a bullet of the same weight + type. I have loaded and fired thousands of Rainier plated bullets in 9mm and 45 acp using mid range lead data with no problems. I started with a minimum charge of Unique behind a 230 gr RN Rainier .45 and it would not reliably cycle the slide on my G30. I bumped it up a couple tenths of a grain and they worked great. Don't have any experiance with .40's though.
 

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I have a 155gr. raniere tmj bullet. raniere says to use leade cast recipes. I cant find any rcipes for this aprticular bullet in a published book. any advice short of getting different bullets.
Look at the Accurate Reloading Data. They have loads for Rainier, Berry and Lead bullets in 155 grain. Ramshot Powders also has lead bullet loads for their powders. If all else fails, try to find someone with a copy of the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook. It may have loads for the 40 S&W.

And yes, you can go below published minimums but it must be worked to slowly and there are some powders (usually rifle powders) that should not be reduced. However, shooting an auto usually won't give you much latitude below published minimums as you need a certain amount of power to cycle the action reliably. I shoot 45 Colt for CAS and use a 200 gr. bullet in my revolvers with Hodgdon Titegroup. The starting load published by Hodgdon is 6.5 grains for 933 fps. I'm using 4.2 grains of Titegroup and still getting about 700 fps. More than enough for CAS including the knockdown targets.

Hoss
 

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From Rainier's web site:
We, at Rainier Ballistics, recommend using lead bullet load data when loading our bullets. There is no need for adjustment when using lead bullet load data. Our bullets are jacketed using an electroplating process and are softer than traditionally jacketed bullets; hence the recommendation to use lead bullet load data. If you only have access to traditionally jacketed load data, we recommend reducing maximum charge by 10%. A roll or taper crimp may be used with our bullets; do not over crimp.
From Berry's web site:
Plated bullets occupy a position between cast bullets and jacketed bullets. They are soft lead, but have a hard outer shell on them. When loading plated bullets we have found best results using low- to mid-range jacketed data in the load manual. You must use data for a bullet that has the same weight and profile as the one you are loading. Do not exceed mid-range loads. Do not use magnum loads.
As long as you use the starting load for jacketed bullets, I don't believe you'll have any problems.

Hoss
 

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JerryM. Do you start at the minimum of those loads or below minimum. Thanks
I always start with minmum. Usually minimum is a mild load, and so I do not normally see any advantage to going below. In a few cases I have to see how low before the gun would not cycle. Otherwise I go with minimum or mid range.

Regards,
Jerry
 

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I load Berry's plated bullets. Can't always find load data for lead bullets in a given weight, so I use the lower end of the jacketed bullet data. I never had a problem.

Just curious, I load 155 gr. lead bullets in 40 cal. using ww 231/HP-38, Unique or WSF. What powder are you planning to use?
 

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When I started shooting Berry's bullets I called for reloading info. They referred me to a guy named Bud Watson @ (909) 930-6712. He will give you specific loading data. The general guideline he gave me was that when shooting plated bullets, never exceed 1100 fps.

Shooting loads under the min recommended can not only lead to squib loads, but also detonation which is basically like setting off an explosion in your chamber. Normally the powder burns very fast, but not an explosion, from back to front. With a light load, the powder lays at the bottom of the case and the primer (may) ignites it all at the same time.
 

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.................Shooting loads under the min recommended can not only lead to squib loads, but also detonation which is basically like setting off an explosion in your chamber. Normally the powder burns very fast, but not an explosion, from back to front. With a light load, the powder lays at the bottom of the case and the primer (may) ignites it all at the same time.
I don't believe you'll find any powder manufacturer who will concede that detonation (as you describe it) exists or is even possible. I made the mistake once of making a comment about the possibility of detonation to Mike Daly (Hodgdon Powder Co.) and got a two hour lecture about how it wasn't possible and after listening to him, I believe him to be absolutely correct.

Hoss
 

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IN SASS I am using 5.0 grs of Trailboss, 200 Gr Lead RNFP in a .45 Schofield case. THe load is not listed anywhere, I can find.

For IDPA I am using 2.9 Grains of Clays ( not International or Universal Clays) with a 180 Lead RNFP in a Stock G35 ( .40 S&W) for a PF of 131

Reloading can be fun and dangerous ------do your research.
 
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