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I have a buddy and I have reason to believe he is having a problem with limp wristing. He has a new Smith & Wesson 9mm on the way from Buds Guns and I want him to have a good start. He's 60 years old and he's great with a shotgun but almost no experience with handguns. I want to explain to him how limp wristing can cause jams but it is something I have never had a problem with and I don't know the best way to explain it to him. I could use a few pointers from you guys on what to tell him. Thanks!
 

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I suggest having him shoot several mags' worth of ammo first, before deciding if (a) there is a problem, and (b) if limp-wristing is the cause. Let's not fix what isn't broken!

In my experience, polymer-framed guns (Glocks in particular) are more susceptible to limp-wristing than all-metal guns.

If you suspect limp-wrisitng is a problem, have your "student" increase his grip pressure on the gun until the fingernails are on the edge of turning white. With that level of grip pressure, it's hard to have the arm and wrist relaxed, but observe closely as your friend shoots. Maybe start with a death grip, then work downwards in intensity until the gun doesn't function well, so you know the limits of the grip force required.
 

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^^^^ good advice. Just make sure he has both arms fully extended and tell him to lock his wrists in place and hold the pistol very firmly. If he's doing this there's no reason he should be limp wristing it. As stated above, he can dial down the pressure to what he would consider a good, comfortable grip on the gun for him and keep shooting. But if he starts having issues again he'll need to train himself to hold the pistol more firmly.
 

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I have never had a problem limp wristing a 9mm. I have had problems shooting a 10mm with my weak hand, and had problems limp wristing the 460 Rowland with both hands holding the gun. When it happens I have to remember my grip(s) on the gun.
 

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If you can demonstrate the ability to fire the same gun, consistently and with no jam, that should confirm the grip problem in a fairly benign yet irrefutable way.

Then it becomes a matter of figuring out when the grip is inadequate. For example he may hold tight until firing the gun but loosen up as the round clears the chamber because of anticipating recoil, or simply thinking its no longer necessary to grip so tight at that time. When you watch a good shooter on video the gun rises very little upon firing and the target is easily reacquired. Less so when I shoot..
 

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In an actual deadly threat scenario there will be a very firm or crush grip on the pistol.
It's an instinctive human survival mechanism.
Might as well get used to it while killing paper. :yup:
Normal humans will not have a relaxed paper punching grip when the bad guy is ready to spatter their brains on the sidewalk with a tire iron.
 

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I have a buddy and I have reason to believe he is having a problem with limp wristing. He has a new Smith & Wesson 9mm on the way from Buds Guns and I want him to have a good start. He's 60 years old and he's great with a shotgun but almost no experience with handguns. I want to explain to him how limp wristing can cause jams but it is something I have never had a problem with and I don't know the best way to explain it to him. I could use a few pointers from you guys on what to tell him. Thanks!
Understanding exactly what wrist lock is and is not is critical for avoiding the effects of limp-wristing. Imparting that understanding is an excellent place to start when teaching novice pistol shooters.
 
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^^^^ good advice. Just make sure he has both arms fully extended and tell him to lock his wrists in place and hold the pistol very firmly. If he's doing this there's no reason he should be limp wristing it. As stated above, he can dial down the pressure to what he would consider a good, comfortable grip on the gun for him and keep shooting. But if he starts having issues again he'll need to train himself to hold the pistol more firmly.
Grip pressure and arm extension aren't necessarily elements of wrist lock. It is quite possible to have a death crush on the gun with the hand, and yet not have the wrist locked. Similarly, wrist lock must be maintained through all firing positions, be it quarter, half, or three quarter hip, high retention, chest ready through partial and full extension in order to avoid the effects of limp-wristing.
 

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I have a buddy and I have reason to believe he is having a problem with limp wristing. He has a new Smith & Wesson 9mm on the way from Buds Guns and I want him to have a good start. He's 60 years old and he's great with a shotgun but almost no experience with handguns. I want to explain to him how limp wristing can cause jams but it is something I have never had a problem with and I don't know the best way to explain it to him. I could use a few pointers from you guys on what to tell him. Thanks!
You have already been given some very good advice.

Whether you think you might be limp wristing or not, a very firm, solid vise like convulsive grip is going to be of primary importance to any new shooter with a semi-automatic pistol. Learning exactly how to grip the pistol in the first place though is equally important.

A couple of other rudiments to shooting with any adequate degree of accuracy follows learning how to grip and then gripping as tight as you can. 1. Trigger control 2. Sighting.

Grip the gun correctly and very tightly and the other two essentials will become easier to learn. Not easy, but easier.

None of this can be done without serious practice. You don't need to go to a range to learn how to grip a gun. That can be done with an unloaded pistol from home.
 

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luckydog Why do you think your buddy is having a problem with limp wristing ?? There are a number of you tube videos to help a person with a limp wrist issue .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
luckydog Why do you think your buddy is having a problem with limp wristing ?? There are a number of you tube videos to help a person with a limp wrist issue .
Because he shot my Shield that has never had a problem and had two failure to ejects while shooting one magazine.
 

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Limp wristing seems to be a ubiquitous shooting technique issue in San Francisco!!
They shoot guns in San Francisco?
 

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In a two-handed pistol grip, tell him not to over-squeeze ("strangle") with his fingers (via forearm muscles). Tell him to concentrate on pressing his opposing palms diRECTLY (180 degrees) toward each other (he should feel it in his chest muscles). That'll improve both his rigidity (by using bigger muscles) and his trigger-control (lets his index finger move more independently). It WORKS! :yup:
 
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Wrist-lock is the aspect of grip that I emphasize most heavily when working with new shooters, since every other aspect can vary with position, stance and circumstance.
 

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I tend to agree with trying to shoot first, as a different gun may present no problems. But by way of example, I first instructed my 65+ female friend who has carpal tunnel and arthritis to grip firmly her new VP9 when firing. She had no problems at all, and is new to handguns of the autoloader type. Perhaps explaining why a firm grip with an autoloader is necessary, and staying away from loaded and frankly boorish terms like "limp-wristing" would be effective.
 

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I tend to agree with trying to shoot first, as a different gun may present no problems. But by way of example, I first instructed my 65+ female friend who has carpal tunnel and arthritis to grip firmly her new VP9 when firing. She had no problems at all, and is new to handguns of the autoloader type. Perhaps explaining why a firm grip with an autoloader is necessary, and staying away from loaded and frankly boorish terms like "limp-wristing" would be effective.
Loaded and boorish? It seems like a neutral and accurate description of the phenomena to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Loaded and boorish? It seems like a neutral and accurate description of the phenomena to me.
LMAO! That's the only term I have ever heard it called!
 
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