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Well I have had it with my LGS. I have bought two pistols from them and had been buying ammunition. Now they are selling *reloads* for 48 cents per round. Then the other day I was drooling over would have been my third pistol purchase from the shop. I had dry fired a Sig P226 about 10 times and the store owner told me to stop dry firing it. He said it was OK to dry fire it 2 or 3 times to feel the trigger, but to stop it.

I smiled, handed the gun back, and walked out to never return. BTW, that trigger was smooth!
 

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The first time or the tenth? I think I would have asked you to stop also.
 

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Well I have had it with my LGS. I have bought two pistols from them and had been buying ammunition. Now they are selling *reloads* for 48 cents per round. Then the other day I was drooling over would have been my third pistol purchase from the shop. I had dry fired a Sig P226 about 10 times and the store owner told me to stop dry firing it. He said it was OK to dry fire it 2 or 3 times to feel the trigger, but to stop it.

I smiled, handed the gun back, and walked out to never return. BTW, that trigger was smooth!
I don't think the owner was being unreasonable. Customers are picky about new guns, and if they show marks of wear, the won't buy it.

For example, did you ever notice the left side of a hammer on an 1894 Marlin lever action, or a 39A lever action? After a couple of hundred cycles a portion of the blue starts to wear off, and then customers wonder if the new Marlin is actually a used one.

Or how about a revolver? Some customers don't want a turn ring on the cylinder when they buy a new revolver.

Realize the owner probably sees lots of guys "playing" with his inventory. Suddenly he's selling a "new" Sig with 1,000+ dry fires. If anything, you should be appreciative that the owner is minimizing unnecessary handling of his inventory before he sells it to customers.
 

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Well I have had it with my LGS. I have bought two pistols from them and had been buying ammunition. Now they are selling *reloads* for 48 cents per round. Then the other day I was drooling over would have been my third pistol purchase from the shop. I had dry fired a Sig P226 about 10 times and the store owner told me to stop dry firing it. He said it was OK to dry fire it 2 or 3 times to feel the trigger, but to stop it.

I smiled, handed the gun back, and walked out to never return. BTW, that trigger was smooth!
Sorry, but I think you're the one who's being unreasonable, unless the owner yelled at you or was very disrespectful. I think he has every right to limit your number of dry fires on new merchandise.
 

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It don't take ten times to feel a trigger.
Shop on line
 

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I agree with the others. If you are going to be a gun guy, you need to learn gun etiquette.
 
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The weapon was still his , plus its not a big deal . But this did happen to me when i went to a mattress store and fell asleep. :embarassed:
 

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I would have to throw in with, well everyone else in the thread, and let you know that dry firing it 10 times or more is excessive. I wouldn't do that to my own guns without using snap caps, let alone thinking I could do it to someone else's.
 

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Ya, I guess you are right.
Holy crap - somebody on an online forum actually accepted criticism! THESE ARE THE END TIMES! :smile:

In all seriousness, you deserve a round of applause. It takes character to admit that you may have been in error.

:congrats:
 

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If I'm looking at buying a gun from a LGS and want to feel the trigger I always ask first... Usually one dry fire Is enough for me... Just my .02
+1. I agree with you. Ask first, then once, maybe twice...that's it.
 

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Holy crap - somebody on an online forum actually accepted criticism! THESE ARE THE END TIMES! :smile:

In all seriousness, you deserve a round of applause. It takes character to admit that you may have been in error.

:congrats:
Now go back and buy that 226. You won't be sorry.
 

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Holy crap - somebody on an online forum actually accepted criticism! THESE ARE THE END TIMES! :smile:

In all seriousness, you deserve a round of applause. It takes character to admit that you may have been in error.

:congrats:
I agree he is just like a Timex watch . He seems like a guy you could drink a cold beer or soda pop with . Its nice to have someone that has a sense of humor.:Winner2:
 

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IMHO. Best way to find out is rent one and shoot it at the range, to see from that point of view.
 

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I don't think the owner was being unreasonable. SNIP Or how about a revolver? Some customers don't want a turn ring on the cylinder when they buy a new revolver. SNIP Suddenly he's selling a "new" Sig with 1,000+ dry fires. If anything, you should be appreciative that the owner is minimizing unnecessary handling of his inventory before he sells it to customers.
I'm not trying to kick the OP who manfully stated that others could be right. I cant stand it when i see someone repeatedly spin a cylinder, or hold a pistol sideways.
 

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I agree that the OP should ask prior to dry firing a new handgun in a gun shop. And yes, it is true that is the accepted proper firearm etiquette.

I personally always ask and will usually dry fire twice since some guns will not give you an accurate feel of the trigger on the first trigger pull due to possibly congealed or sticky factory lubrication.

That having been said the OP did not commit the crime of the century since SIG recommends Snap Cap use for their center fire handguns only when being extensively dry fired.

Ideally what should have happened is that if the OP asked if it was OK to dry fire the handgun....then somebody in the shop behind the counter should have said: Yes, it's OK but, just dry fire it a few times....or...Yes, but, let me run over and grab you a Snap Cap first.

If...that is their policy.

In a perfect world the potential buyer should ask for permission but, since it is an imperfect world the folks working in the shop should make their policy on dry firing clear to the customer as they hand the firearm over to the customer.

They should know in advance that many people/customers (especially newbie firearm shoppers/buyers) are going start pulling triggers almost the instant that they get a firearm in hand.
 
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