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I recently bought myself a g23 as my first handgun that I will be using for CC (sending in my App on Monday). I love the gun. Very fun to shoot.

However, I'd like to pick up a 22 handgun that I can just play with. It's cheap as dirt to shoot and can still provide a very enjoyable afternoon activity for cheap (gf likes to shoot too).

What would your recommendations be?
 

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I have a great .22 target pistol, it's not cheap but is the most accurate gun I've ever shot. It's the s&w model 41. I can make soda cans dance at 50 yards, and can hit them at 100 yards, I've even shot a clay pigeon out of a hand thrower with it. You can shoot it all day for like 10 bucks I love it. My wife also loves it, It's the only gun I have she likes to shoot, and she's good with it too. The only substitution I've shot is the browning buckmark it is fairly cheap, but get one with a bull barrel.
 

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I'm partial to the Ruger MK pistols or maybe the 22/45.
Not as expensive as the S&W 41-46 pistols.
 

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Ruger Mark III. Browning Buckmark. Colt Woodsman.
 

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Love my Ruger Mark II Slab sides.


Here is the Wather P22 along with it's bigger brother the P99.


The Ruger is a superior firearm, but the Walther is flat fun to shoot and is great for smaller hands.
 

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For my second post, I'd like to suggest a conversion kit. That way you can pratice with your defensive hand gun and I think it'll be cheaper. Just my .02
 

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Ruger 10/22 charger. Makes great bench shooter with the scope and bi-pod.
Also gives you the option of adding a long barrel and full stock.
Perfectly legal with the charger, not so turning the 10/22 into a pistol.
(charger into rifle=ok; rifle into pistol= not ok)
(This is what I was able to learn asking the dealer, and looking around online. Someone will correct me if I'm wrong)

I've also owned a Ruger 22/45. Excellent accuracy but I hated to clean it. There's a tiny lever inside that has to be situated just so to reassemble the damn thing.

A friend of mine has a 9-shot .22 revolver. Something like that would make a great plinker, and they're WAY easier to clean than an auto.
 

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Ruger Mark II, III in 22/45 model

The grip more closely resembles a great number of every day carry guns, the 22/45 is rock solid, normally POA/POI right out of the box, extremely reliable, and really easy to take down and re-assemble once you learn the trick of turning the gun upside down, pulling the trigger to make the little hang down thingie retract into the handle part before you try to make it (the little hang down thingie) line up with the notch in the folding latchie doo-hickie before snapping it shut. :blink:

surv
 

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Ruger 10/22 charger. Makes great bench shooter with the scope and bi-pod.
Also gives you the option of adding a long barrel and full stock.
Perfectly legal with the charger, not so turning the 10/22 into a pistol.
(charger into rifle=ok; rifle into pistol= not ok)
(This is what I was able to learn asking the dealer, and looking around online. Someone will correct me if I'm wrong)

I've also owned a Ruger 22/45. Excellent accuracy but I hated to clean it. There's a tiny lever inside that has to be situated just so to reassemble the damn thing.

A friend of mine has a 9-shot .22 revolver. Something like that would make a great plinker, and they're WAY easier to clean than an auto.
The Ruger autopistol has to have the hammer cocked to install te bolt [if it was not install in the reciever first[.
That hangy down thingy is the hammer strut. The problem with closing that other hangy thing [mainspring housing.take-down lever] is that you have to release the hammer from the cocked position and make sure the hammer strut lines up to the mainspring. If you do it wrong, the hammer strut gets bound by a pin and teh bolt can't be retracted.
 

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yep:smile:

I've taught at least 6 of my friends how to take care of their Rugers in the last few years. It's amazing how their eyes light up when they see just how simple it really is.

surv
 

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I second the Ruger MK II / III in 22/45, the mag release and grip favor current semis, but the classic design is a proven shooter. You can get them in bull barrel, fluted, and slab side from lengths of 4" - 8". Personally I plan to get a 4" bull and remove the front sight or replace with a bead so it can be carried in my arthritic days which may lie ahead. Most have adjustable sights...

The classic 5" bull barrel is great! I actually have a 5" regular barrel think old luger style, a slab side which is my favorite pistol (at 50 yards I can keep 85-90% in a 6" circle) and my wife's 6 7/8" stainless normal barrel hogue grips with thumbrest, she is mighty good with that pistol.

The down side is the field stripping...
 

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I believe I would have to go with the conversion kit. I bought a P22, but now wish I had a conversion kit for my Kimber.
 

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I second the Ruger Mark II (love mine), but you also might want to consider the Beretta Bobcat. It's a fun little .22 to play with.

 

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Advantage Arms conversion package. Thats the way to go.
 

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the ruger mark pistols make for a good 22lr pistol.
 

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The Ruger autopistol has to have the hammer cocked to install te bolt [if it was not install in the reciever first[.
That hangy down thingy is the hammer strut. The problem with closing that other hangy thing [mainspring housing.take-down lever] is that you have to release the hammer from the cocked position and make sure the hammer strut lines up to the mainspring. If you do it wrong, the hammer strut gets bound by a pin and teh bolt can't be retracted.
That's "over engineering" in my book. I'm not knocking it. You could drive nails with the thing if you have a steady hand. I just felt obliged to warn him, since this would be OP's second gun. Ease of maintenance should be considered when purchasing a gun. Maybe not #1 on the list, but certainly a consideration.
That's why I recommended a revolver. Plus you can likely find one cheap enough to buy two. Nice Christmas present for the GF. :santaclaus:
 

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Ruger Mark II, III in 22/45 model

The grip more closely resembles a great number of every day carry guns, the 22/45 is rock solid, normally POA/POI right out of the box, extremely reliable, and really easy to take down and re-assemble once you learn the trick of turning the gun upside down, pulling the trigger to make the little hang down thingie retract into the handle part before you try to make it (the little hang down thingie) line up with the notch in the folding latchie doo-hickie before snapping it shut. :blink:

surv

Yeah, I agree. It's hard to beat the Ruger. Truly the only downside to the Ruger is the assembly process (after field stripping). I know everyone says you can get the hang of it after a few times, but it's still a cumbersome and annoying assembly process. Otherwise, the Rugers are a great value and come in many different flavors.

My Ruger did have some extraction problems, so I ended up installing a Volquartsen extractor and now it functions perfectly.

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