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Discussion Starter #2
Whoa! Different Site

425 George Washingtons for a set of Sambar Stag Gun Grips.:gah:
BEAUTIFUL GRIPS THOUGH!:yup:
 

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Exellent.

A friend of mine and well known knifesmith uses Mammoth Ivory for some of his high dollar custom knives. Expensive stuff.
 

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That stuff is incredibly pretty but hey - I really must be lacking something (be quiet Bud and QK!) - I cannot get excited enough to want such on my guns. Weird eh!

It's not so much a cost thing as just feeling I don't need them! I do like good wood tho (and again - no comments please!) :wink: :18:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Stag Grips

The stag grips are really tough to make & get to look as they should.
It's all in the material selection which is RARE in the US these days.
Take off too much material & they lose the classic stag look & start to just look like bone & really LARGE antler pieces are needed to make perfect looking grips.

Oh Chris....You're SO doggone utilitarian! :biggrin2:

Nothing beats a nice set of Grade A Plus...African Elephant Ivory Grips though.:yup:
Nuttin' !
 

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I guess I'm wondering how anyone gets mammoth tusks. In fact I thought that there were lots of restrictions on the ivory trade in general. :confused:
 

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Mammoth tusks are fossils. Since all mammoths are already extinct, no restrictions on their ivory. Everything else has restrictions of one sort or another.
 

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I guess I'm wondering how anyone gets mammoth tusks. In fact I thought that there were lots of restrictions on the ivory trade in general.
Guys looking for mammoth tusks use SONAR to find them under the ice in the Artic and Alaska in areas where Mammoths were known to frequent. I hear that they find slot in the Russian Tundra also.

Then they dig them up. Its a tedious and expensive process.

IRC, even the mammoth ivory has to have an origin slip when imported to verify that is in fact fossil ivory. The end useer never sees this, but the guy making the stuff has to keep a record of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No Restrictions On Mammoth Ivory

Or Mastodon Ivory.

The African Elephant Ivory Laws are as follows. (in brief)

Any old stock preexisting elephant ivory that is already IN the United States is still legal to Buy Sell & Trade WITHIN the United States.

Items made of African Elephant Ivory cannot be shipped to non U.S. destinations and no new worked or raw elephant ivory can be imported into the United States.

There are certain exceptions.
Specific finished ivory items that can be documented to be at least 100 years old can still enter the U.S. with that documentation...and legally taken trophy tusks with the C.I.T.E.S. and import permits can be brought into the U.S. but, (I Think) cannot be sold once they are here.

Since the U.S. is out of the world trade of African Ivory....using up the old domestic Ivory that is already here in no way affects African Elephant populations & does not promote poaching.

But, when it's all gone it's probably gone for good in the States.
 

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Those grips are pretty nice, and I'm surprised, the price isn't bad either.
 
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