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I'm kind of curious how long it's been since you've been to Colorado Springs because you haven't been able to ride the incline since 1990.

I'm not sure what you mean when you say the Cave of the Winds is fake it's a cave.

I'm kind of curious where these gas stations are that run your credit card every $5. Because I live here and I haven't run into one of those yet
It was on Colorado Ave up by the weed stores. I went in and ask the clerk why the pump kept shutting off. He said so we don't lose too much money on prepaid cards.
 

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Howdy!

I didn’t see it mentioned but when we visited Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs there were several cars broken into (smashed windows) while people walked around area.

“Happy Trails”
Chiefneon
 

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Howdy!

I didn’t see it mentioned but when we visited Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs there were several cars broken into (smashed windows) while people walked around area.

“Happy Trails”
Chiefneon
"Smash and grab" car break-ins are very common in southern Colorado (including Colo Spgs and Pueblo), as is purse snatching. I have not heard of pickpocketing being a serious problem. Homeless people and panhandlers just about everywhere, and where they aren't the street gangs are. Drug use in public is pretty common, and drug dealing can be seen pretty regularly.

Colorado honors concealed carry permits from just about every state that honors our permits. Open carry is allowed by law (but watch out in the Denver metro area, as it can result in a very forceful LE response to any MWAG calls). Sale of magazines over 15 rounds was banned by state law (2013 as I recall), but existing mags are not affected, so as others have commented the burden of proof is on the prosecution, thus this is pretty much unenforceable (at a recent gun show I saw hundreds of 30-round AR and AK mags openly offered for sale). Concealed carry inside your automobile is allowed without a permit required.

Long guns (rifles and shotguns) may not have a round chambered while in a vehicle (fish & game laws to prevent road hunting & poaching). Knives with blades up to 3.5" may be lawfully carried openly or concealed, and automatics (switchblades) up to 3.5" are treated as regular pocket knives; knives with blades longer than 3.5" are considered dangerous or deadly weapons, with open carry OK but concealed carry banned.

Any premises may be posted by the owner to prohibit firearms. Anyone who violates such postings may be required to leave, and if he does not comply may be charged with criminal trespassing.

No weapons of any kind are allowed in courthouses, public schools (without permission of the administrator), police stations, jails, or anywhere the state legislature is meeting. State and local government agencies may prohibit open carry in most government facilities, but concealed carry with permit is generally permitted. Firearms may be carried in licensed liquor establishments (subject to prohibition by owners), but no person may possess a firearm while under the influence of alcohol.

Colorado has a generally strong state preemption, which prohibits cities or counties from enacting or enforcing local laws that conflict with state law. However, a number of localities (primarily in the Denver metro area, which consists of 13 cities and 5 counties) continue to try to enforce local laws, specifically in cases of open carry, magazine capacity, "assault weapons", etc. Best course of action is to be very circumspect in your activities (and many of us do our best to avoid the Denver-Boulder corridor completely so we don't have to put up with their nonsense).

The above is from memory, so if I have misstated anything I may need to be corrected by others with better knowledge (or memories).
 

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"Smash and grab" car break-ins are very common in southern Colorado (including Colo Spgs and Pueblo), as is purse snatching.
What changed over the last 10 years? I've been visiting family in Colorado Springs since the early 1970s. When I moved here in 2019, most businesses still knocked off by noon Saturday and were closed on Sunday. I liked it. Sleepy little town. Had a GPS stolen from my vehicle in 2012. My fault, as I left it in there and forgot to lock the door.

A year ago, some wantmetopunchems broke both my door and ignition locks trying to steal my vehicle from inside a locked apartment garage. For three years I'd been battling stupid residents who kept propping the walk exit open for "convenience." I'm sure the bushes are chock full of the gourd-sized rocks repurposed from their intended door-stops.

Three weeks ago I caught two kids trying vehicle door handles shortly after 4:00 AM.

Colorado honors concealed carry permits from just about every state that honors our permits. Open carry is allowed by law (but watch out in the Denver metro area, as it can result in a very forceful LE response to any MWAG calls).
Technically, while Denver's claim of "home rule" was never overturned in that deadlocked case, it was never confirmed, either, nor was it appealed. Ergo, Denver's No Open Carry law remains standing as an enforceable law.

Two things I do not understand:

1. How anyone could read Colorado's Constitution and in any way, shape, manner or form think that Denver's law banning open carry is Constitutional.

2. How any police force in Colorado (or anywhere) could so vehemently violate their oaths to support and defend Colorado's and the U.S. Constitution. Why is DPD so hard-over anti when most police departments and nearly all county sheriffs respect the state and federal Constitutions?

Sale of magazines over 15 rounds was banned by state law (2013 as I recall), but existing mags are not affected, so as others have commented the burden of proof is on the prosecution, thus this is pretty much unenforceable (at a recent gun show I saw hundreds of 30-round AR and AK mags openly offered for sale).
Even my local State Representative, a staunch conservative and veteran through and through, commented that "15 rounds is more than enough." Apparently, the brain-washing that limiting magazine sizes somehow adversely affects violent crime or that it is "SOMEHOW" not an infringement on the right of the people to keep and bear arms runs deep.

Concealed carry inside your automobile is allowed without a permit required.
But what about carry the firearm concealed to and from one's residence? What about driving within 1,000' of a school zone? What driving onto school grounds, say, to pick up your child? What about leaving your firearm in your vehicle while parked on school grounds while you go inside, say, to attend a ceremony?

C.R.S. 18-12-102. Possessing a dangerous or illegal weapon - affirmative defense - definition: (5) It shall be an affirmative defense to the charge of possessing a dangerous weapon, or to the charge of possessing an illegal weapon, that the person so accused was a peace officer or member of the armed forces of the United States or Colorado National Guard acting in the lawful discharge of his duties, or that said person has a valid permit and license for possession of such weapon.

C.R.S. 18-12-105. Unlawfully carrying a concealed weapon - unlawful possession of weapons: (1) A person commits a class 2 misdemeanor if such person knowingly and unlawfully:
(b) Carries a firearm concealed on or about his or her person
(2) It shall not be an offense if the defendant was:
(a) A person in his or her own dwelling or place of business or on property owned or under his or her control at the time of the act of carrying; or
(b) A person in a private automobile or other private means of conveyance who carries a weapon for lawful protection of such person's or another's person or property while traveling; or
(c) A person who, at the time of carrying a concealed weapon, held a valid written permit to carry a concealed weapon issued pursuant to section 18-12-105.1, as it existed prior to its repeal, or, if the weapon involved was a handgun, held a valid permit to carry a concealed handgun or a temporary emergency permit issued pursuant to part 2 of this article; except that it shall be an offense under this section if the person was carrying a concealed handgun in violation of the provisions of section 18-12-214

By the letter of the law, you can CC from your front door to your vehicle parked in your driveway, but need a permit to CC the extra ten feet to your car parked in the street? What about those in apartments, condos, and townhomes? Same thing?

C.R.S. 18-12-105.6. Limitation on local ordinances regarding firearms in private vehicles: (2)
(a) Based on the findings specified in subsection (1) of this section, the general assembly concludes that the carrying of weapons in private automobiles or other private means of conveyance for hunting or for lawful protection of a person's or another's person or property while traveling into, through, or within, a municipal, county, or city and county jurisdiction, regardless of the number of times the person stops in a jurisdiction, is a matter of statewide concern and is not an offense.
(b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no municipality, county, or city and county shall have the authority to enact or enforce any ordinance or resolution that would restrict a person's ability to travel with a weapon in a private automobile or other private means of conveyance for hunting or for lawful protection of a person's or another's person or property while traveling into, through, or within, a municipal, county, or city and county jurisdiction, regardless of the number of times the person stops in a jurisdiction.

So, BOOM, and BOOM. It's both legal to carry in your vehicle and illegal to restrict it.

C.R.W. 18-12-105.5. Unlawfully carrying a weapon - unlawful possession of weapons - school, college, or university grounds:
(3) It shall not be an offense under this section if:
(a) The weapon is unloaded and remains inside a motor vehicle while upon the real estate of any public or private college, university, or seminary; or
(b) The person is in that person's own dwelling or place of business or on property owned or under that person's control at the time of the act of carrying; or
(c) The person is in a private automobile or other private means of conveyance and is carrying a weapon for lawful protection of that person's or another's person or property while traveling; or
(d) The person, at the time of carrying a concealed weapon, held a valid written permit to carry a concealed weapon issued pursuant to section 18-12-105.1, as said section existed prior to its repeal; except that it shall be an offense under this section if the person was carrying a concealed handgun in violation of the provisions of section 18-12-214 (3); or
(d.5) The weapon involved was a handgun and the person held a valid permit to carry a concealed handgun or a temporary emergency permit issued pursuant to part 2 of this article; except that it shall be an offense under this section if the person was carrying a concealed handgun in violation of the provisions of section 18-12-214 (3); or
(e) The person is a school resource officer, as defined in section 22-32-109.1 (1)(g.5), C.R.S., or a peace officer, as described in section 16-2.5-101, C.R.S., when carrying a weapon in conformance with the policy of the employing agency as provided in section 16-2.5-101 (2), C.R.S.

The key word in all of the above is "OR." If any ONE of (a) through (e) applies, "it shall not be an offense."

Thus must, however, be squared with federal law:

U.S. Code § 921. Definitions
(25) The term “school zone” means—
(A) in, or on the grounds of, a public, parochial or private school; or
(B) within a distance of 1,000 feet from the grounds of a public, parochial or private school.
(26) The term “school” means a school which provides elementary or secondary education, as determined under State law.
(29) The term “handgun” means—
(A) a firearm which has a short stock and is designed to be held and fired by the use of a single hand; and
(B) any combination of parts from which a firearm described in subparagraph (A) can be assembled.

U.S. Code § 922. Unlawful acts:
(2)
(A) It shall be unlawful for any individual knowingly to possess a firearm that has moved in or that otherwise affects interstate or foreign commerce at a place that the individual knows, or has reasonable cause to believe, is a school zone.
(B) Subparagraph (A) does not apply to the possession of a firearm—
(i) on private property not part of school grounds;
(ii) if the individual possessing the firearm is licensed to do so by the State in which the school zone is located or a political subdivision of the State, and the law of the State or political subdivision requires that, before an individual obtains such a license, the law enforcement authorities of the State or political subdivision verify that the individual is qualified under law to receive the license;
(iii) that is—
(I) not loaded; and
(II) in a locked container, or a locked firearms rack that is on a motor vehicle;
(iv) by an individual for use in a program approved by a school in the school zone;
(v) by an individual in accordance with a contract entered into between a school in the school zone and the individual or an employer of the individual;
(vi) by a law enforcement officer acting in his or her official capacity; or
(vii) that is unloaded and is possessed by an individual while traversing school premises for the purpose of gaining access to public or private lands open to hunting, if the entry on school premises is authorized by school authorities.

By their clearly evident mutual exclusivity ("private property not part of school grounds" vs the previously stated definition for "school zone"), (B)(i) through (vii) are also OR statements.

Back to C.R.S. 18-12-214. Authority granted by permit - carrying restrictions
(3) A permit issued pursuant to this part 2 does not authorize a person to carry a concealed handgun onto the real property, or into any improvements erected thereon, of a public elementary, middle, junior high, or high school; except that:
(a) A permittee may have a handgun on the real property of the public school so long as the handgun remains in his or her vehicle and, if the permittee is not in the vehicle, the handgun is in a compartment within the vehicle and the vehicle is locked;
(b) A permittee who is employed or retained by contract by a school district or charter school as a school security officer may carry a concealed handgun onto the real property, or into any improvement erected thereon, of a public elementary, middle, junior high, or high school while the permittee is on duty;
(c) A permittee may carry a concealed handgun on undeveloped real property owned by a school district that is used for hunting or other shooting sports.

Thus, when you take the ENTIRETY of the following regulations together:

C.R.S. 18-12-102. Possessing a dangerous or illegal weapon - affirmative defense - definition
C.R.S. 18-12-105. Unlawfully carrying a concealed weapon - unlawful possession of weapons
C.R.S. 18-12-105.6. Limitation on local ordinances regarding firearms in private vehicles
C.R.W. 18-12-105.5. Unlawfully carrying a weapon - unlawful possession of weapons - school, college, or university grounds
U.S. Code § 921. Definitions
U.S. Code § 922. Unlawful acts
C.R.S. 18-12-214. Authority granted by permit - carrying restrictions

IF a private citizen has a valid, current CO concealed handgun permit, you can drive onto school grounds carrying a loaded handgun, including one in the barrel. If you leave the vehicle, the firearm must remain in a compartment in the vehicle and the vehicle must be locked.

I know quite a few people have heartburn with this, but this is indeed the semantically correct summary of the above regulations. Federal law allows for state exception and Colorado provides it because so many people do carry a firearm to/from work or other activities and people often drop their kids off and pick their kids up from school in conjunction with those activities.

FYI, the Giffords Law Center argues concealed carry laws "threaten the safety of children and increase the likelihood of tragic school shootings." Both Gabby and Baldy are so flagrantly anti-Constitutional and anti-common sense I just want to puke.

To the best of my knowledge, however, one cannot CC between their home and their vehicle if they step foot outside their own private property. Thus, apartment, condo and townhome dwellers are just screwed.

Long guns (rifles and shotguns) may not have a round chambered while in a vehicle (fish & game laws to prevent road hunting & poaching). Knives with blades up to 3.5" may be lawfully carried openly or concealed, and automatics (switchblades) up to 3.5" are treated as regular pocket knives; knives with blades longer than 3.5" are considered dangerous or deadly weapons, with open carry OK but concealed carry banned.
Does the Colorado General Assembly not understand the definition of arms? Do they not understand that knives are arms? Arms is short for armaments, which include knives, guns, spears, swords, bow and arrow, etc.

Restricting (infringing) the length of a CC knife with a blade longer than 3.5" violates the Second Amendment.

That's another thing I don't understand:

1. How could lawmakers not understand the law?

2. How could the people let them get away with not understanding the law, much less infringing on their Constitutional rights?

Any premises may be posted by the owner to prohibit firearms. Anyone who violates such postings may be required to leave, and if he does not comply may be charged with criminal trespassing.
Well stated.

...no person may possess a firearm while under the influence of alcohol.
I'm curious: Does this include while in the privacy of one's own home? If so, to what extent must a firearm be removed from one's person so as to no longer be considered under possession? Off the person? In the next room? Locked in a safe? Does C.R.S. even address this nuance? Do we want them to? (NO). Did you ever come across it while on duty?

Colorado has a generally strong state preemption, which prohibits cities or counties from enacting or enforcing local laws that conflict with state law. However, a number of localities (primarily in the Denver metro area, which consists of 13 cities and 5 counties) continue to try to enforce local laws, specifically in cases of open carry, magazine capacity, "assault weapons", etc. Best course of action is to be very circumspect in your activities (and many of us do our best to avoid the Denver-Boulder corridor completely so we don't have to put up with their nonsense).
I thought it was just the City Denver geographically synonymous with Denver County aka "City and County of Denver," and not the entire Denver metropolitan area. I have friends who routinely OC throughout Denver Metro, except, of course, in Denver.

The above is from memory, so if I have misstated anything I may need to be corrected by others with better knowledge (or memories).
Actually, I thought it was very well said. I was the one who had to look things up. It's a good partial review. I've accumulated a long and growing booklet on Colorado CHP Do's and Don'ts.

Another item that should be addressed is no OC on public transportation, to include buses and trains. I don't know about multi-pax shuttles, but I think you're ok in cabs, provided the driver is ok with OC. CC is fine on public transportation.
 

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"Smash and grab" car break-ins are very common in southern Colorado (including Colo Spgs and Pueblo), as is purse snatching. I have not heard of pickpocketing being a serious problem. Homeless people and panhandlers just about everywhere, and where they aren't the street gangs are. Drug use in public is pretty common, and drug dealing can be seen pretty regularly.

Colorado honors concealed carry permits from just about every state that honors our permits. Open carry is allowed by law (but watch out in the Denver metro area, as it can result in a very forceful LE response to any MWAG calls). Sale of magazines over 15 rounds was banned by state law (2013 as I recall), but existing mags are not affected, so as others have commented the burden of proof is on the prosecution, thus this is pretty much unenforceable (at a recent gun show I saw hundreds of 30-round AR and AK mags openly offered for sale). Concealed carry inside your automobile is allowed without a permit required.

Long guns (rifles and shotguns) may not have a round chambered while in a vehicle (fish & game laws to prevent road hunting & poaching). Knives with blades up to 3.5" may be lawfully carried openly or concealed, and automatics (switchblades) up to 3.5" are treated as regular pocket knives; knives with blades longer than 3.5" are considered dangerous or deadly weapons, with open carry OK but concealed carry banned.

Any premises may be posted by the owner to prohibit firearms. Anyone who violates such postings may be required to leave, and if he does not comply may be charged with criminal trespassing.

No weapons of any kind are allowed in courthouses, public schools (without permission of the administrator), police stations, jails, or anywhere the state legislature is meeting. State and local government agencies may prohibit open carry in most government facilities, but concealed carry with permit is generally permitted. Firearms may be carried in licensed liquor establishments (subject to prohibition by owners), but no person may possess a firearm while under the influence of alcohol.

Colorado has a generally strong state preemption, which prohibits cities or counties from enacting or enforcing local laws that conflict with state law. However, a number of localities (primarily in the Denver metro area, which consists of 13 cities and 5 counties) continue to try to enforce local laws, specifically in cases of open carry, magazine capacity, "assault weapons", etc. Best course of action is to be very circumspect in your activities (and many of us do our best to avoid the Denver-Boulder corridor completely so we don't have to put up with their nonsense).

The above is from memory, so if I have misstated anything I may need to be corrected by others with better knowledge (or memories).
The only corrections I have are minor points of order.

Open carry is illegal in Denver. They have "Homerule" status.

Open carry is prohibited in the public area of police/Sherriff stations. All citizen carry is prohibited in the secure areas

If a cop pulls you over and there's a long gun in the vehicle the statute grants them the authority to check the chamber of the gun.
 
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