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I'm sure some have thought of this too. As of right now I am taking medication for a cold. As a precaution for legal reprecussions I am mnot carrying . The med. label says ' do not operate heavy machinery,ect,ect.' Just thought I wlould mention it as my state requires 0.0 BAC, as well as no influence of drugs.
 

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Good plan, I never considered whether it would be legal to carry after taking some of the over the counter cold medications. I might should so a little research. :redface:
 

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I don’t want to go into details but after numerous back and knee surgeries since I retired from the police department in 1990 I have been in constant pain since then. If I only carried when I wasn’t taking medication I would never carry. There was a time shortly after I retired when I would not allow myself to drive because I did not feel safe. I worked with my doctor and am taking medication that I feel safe and comfortable with. Some of us with health problems that will never go away have to make that decision. I go to the range and am able to shoot well while taking my medication. If I had problems keeping all my holes in the black I would have to reconsider carrying.

How many would give up carrying if they were forced to take some kind of meds for the rest of their life?
 

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Your Right silvercorvette Takeing some kind of meds for the rest of your live would and does alter things ,, im Diabetic so i take pills to controll blood suger and they do afect me someone ... Mostly the shakes if blood suger goes to low or high ..

But its what ya got to live with... If i had to take some kind of painkillers the rest of my life i would have to find the one i was comfortable with and then see how i shot
 

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From time to time(once or twice a week), I have to take Vicoden for pain in my hand. Therapy really makes it swell up. During those times I don't carry. Vicoden makes me sleepy, so I know I'm not at my best. Since my pain is not constant, I have little tolerance to the medication. However, I know several people who take it daily and function perfectly normal.

Caution is our best bet. If you have the slightest doubts, don't carry.

Bud and silver, sounds like you are doing it the right way.
 

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Any doctors or attorneys in the house?

silvercorvette said:
I don’t want to go into details but after numerous back and knee surgeries since I retired from the police department in 1990 I have been in constant pain since then. If I only carried when I wasn’t taking medication I would never carry. There was a time shortly after I retired when I would not allow myself to drive because I did not feel safe. I worked with my doctor and am taking medication that I feel safe and comfortable with. Some of us with health problems that will never go away have to make that decision. I go to the range and am able to shoot well while taking my medication. If I had problems keeping all my holes in the black I would have to reconsider carrying.

How many would give up carrying if they were forced to take some kind of meds for the rest of their life?
Working with your doctor to find a satisfactory treatment that would address medical issues while preserving the ability to safely handle firearms would seem to be a good solution.

Pilots have to meet certain physical standards, but deviations can be approved under what is known as a Statement of Demonstrated Ability (SDA). Example: a person suffers damage to an eye which prevents it from aligning properly with the other eye, resulting in double vision. A simple solution to the double vision would be to wear a patch over one eye, but that might lead to problems with depth perception, cuts down peripheral vision, etc. However, if the person in question can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Federal Aviation Administration that he competently operate an aircraft while wearing a patch, the FAA can issue an SDA which allows the pilot to obtain the necessary medical certificate.

I'd like to see some physicians and attorneys opinions on this issue. At the very least, I think it would be prudent to have a qualified firearms instructor witness you shooting while taking whatever medicine is needed, then have that person sign a statement to the effect that you were observed shooting while medicated and your performance met the some standard, such as the CCW qualification or a state/local law enforcement qualification.

SSKC
 

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The American male is tough old bird refusing to see a doctor unless death is near. At that point he is placed on some type of medication for which there is no alternative, take it or suffer bad results. Usually the medication comes with all types of warnings that various affects may be felt all bad for working around moving equipment, driving etc. But we have to take it or else. I would guess that most people over fifty will be faced with taking something for blood pressure to keep life in control. I suspose the warnings are on the label for good cause but not everyone feels their effect so carrying may be OK!
When I could carry it was more how did I feel that day. If I don't feel good I don't even drive regardless of medication and would not carry, I believe with most of us its good common sense as to drive or carry depending how we feel. Just my .02 worth.
 

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FortyFive said:
The American male is tough old bird refusing to see a doctor unless death is near. At that point he is placed on some type of medication for which there is no alternative, take it or suffer bad results. Usually the medication comes with all types of warnings that various affects may be felt all bad for working around moving equipment, driving etc. But we have to take it or else. I would guess that most people over fifty will be faced with taking something for blood pressure to keep life in control. I suspose the warnings are on the label for good cause but not everyone feels their effect so carrying may be OK!
When I could carry it was more how did I feel that day. If I don't feel good I don't even drive regardless of medication and would not carry, I believe with most of us its good common sense as to drive or carry depending how we feel. Just my .02 worth.
A few years ago when I was trying to find the right medication I got in the car to drive to a dentist appointment. When I got in the car I didn’t feel “RIGHT”. I turned the car around a few hundred feet from my house and went back home. I called up the dentist and canceled the appointment. When I was younger I was confident I could handle almost any situation with my bare hands. Now that I am older slower and more likely to be targeted as a victim I feel a greater need to carry. It’s kind of funny that when we get to a point in our lives where the need to carry is greater that it has ever been, the drugs we take may have a negative effect on the legal battle that follows.
 

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silvercorvette said:
Now that I am older slower and more likely to be targeted as a victim I feel a greater need to carry. It’s kind of funny that when we get to a point in our lives where the need to carry is greater that it has ever been, the drugs we take may have a negative effect on the legal battle that follows.
You took the words right out of my mouth! I too feel the need to carry simply so my wife or I don't get beat to death by some tough guy that wants what I have. But this state makes it very difficult for us to carry.
 

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Like Bud White, I, too, am diabetic and use various medications necessary to help me sustain life. With proper control (most of the time)and constant monitoring of my blood sugar, I feel confident that I am 100% safe in both shooting at the range and carrying a firearm. Anyone that is diabetic and has experienced a hypoglycemic reaction knows it isn't difficult to tell when you're about ready to "do the chicken"...But, just in case it may happen (a low blood sugar reaction), I always carry fast acting glucose tablets in my range bag, in my truck, my desk at work, anywhere I am with regularity-just like a good Boy Scout, I do my best to always "Be Prepared".
 

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I rarely take meds, aside from a BC powder for a sore back or massive headache. I prefer to let my immune do its thing when I have a cold or something. I do think I have shot myself in the foot so to speak, now when I take any medication whatsoever, I have no idea what its gonna do. A few months ago I had a bad cold and Mom reccomended Aleeve cold medicine, while my cold didnt bother me much after taking it, I had to leave work because my balance was so messed up, pretty much felt like I had a weed contact buzz and couldnt stay focused on the paperwork I was doing.

But OTOH if I was taking something on a regular basis I would probably continue carry after my tolerance was built up, sooner if it didnt have any weird side-effects.
 

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Wellll....just to be really safe (that is, armed in public), I'd recommend taking your cold medicine only when your retired for the day and plan on some good shuteye. During the day, just stuff a cotton ball up each nostril. This will have the dual effect of preventing snot from running down over your lip, and will make your disposition considerably onery. Nobody would dare screw with you!
 

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Gringo said:
Like Bud White, I, too, am diabetic and use various medications necessary to help me sustain life. With proper control (most of the time)and constant monitoring of my blood sugar, I feel confident that I am 100% safe in both shooting at the range and carrying a firearm. Anyone that is diabetic and has experienced a hypoglycemic reaction knows it isn't difficult to tell when you're about ready to "do the chicken"...But, just in case it may happen (a low blood sugar reaction), I always carry fast acting glucose tablets in my range bag, in my truck, my desk at work, anywhere I am with regularity-just like a good Boy Scout, I do my best to always "Be Prepared".
I too have the big D. No meds just diet and exercise controlled right now. Like you said I can feel the low coming. Once I drop below a BG of 90 or so I can feel it and get a snack or something. Can't go anywhere without some sort of food. Nuts or chips work really well for me. As for other meds it depends. I know how most stuff affects me so I won't carry if I'm taking something that impairs me. Of course I don't leave the house then either, so it's not a problem.

-Scott-
 
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