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I attended a ceremony at the Florence Civic Center, Florence, SC today, recognizing the Vietnam Veterans in this area. The guest speaker was Medal of Honor Receipient Walter Joseph Marm, Jr, Col, USA Retired and survivor of the first major U.S. battle of the Vietnam War, the Battle of Ia Drang. It was quite an honor and privelege to shake his hand and talk with him.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Joseph_Marm,_Jr.

Pat Northern, USAF Retired, Vietnam Vet
 

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Excellent! Isn't it great to speak to those recipients of such a prestigious medal. The local military museum has a MOH recipient from the Korean war. He's one of two living here in Ohio. I've said hello and he appears to be very quite. His car has the neatest MOH state license plate. I did talk to another member before he passed away, Gen. Paul Tibbets. If you didn't know who he was, you'd simply walk by him without taking notice. The vets I enjoy talking to are the former WWll aircrews who bailed out and were POW's. Unbelievable stories. Amazing. I'm proud to be a lifetime member of the museum.
 

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An honor, yes!

:usa::congrats:
 

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Very humbling to meet a Medal of Honor recipient.

Most recipients however will tell you that "I was just doing my job".

Now that's humble.
 

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Now there is someone I would like to meet!!!!!! What an honor!
 

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The father of a friend of mine (USAFA classmate) won the MOH in Vietnam. He gave a talk to us once (at the time he was the Commandant at USMA) and had some surprising things to say about the medal. Basically said that most winners would happily give it back. In order to win, you either have to die or be around a bunch of people that died. Clearly, all the winners would rather have the bros back than have a medal. He was one of two I've met, and all of them are very impressive yet unassuming men.
 

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I wonder how many of the MOH soldiers thought they were going to die, doing what they did. I imagine most. They can be as humble as they want to be, that's certified HERO to me and given the chance, they will never pay for a meal or a drink in my presence.
 

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I wonder how many of the MOH soldiers thought they were going to die, doing what they did. I imagine most. They can be as humble as they want to be, that's certified HERO to me and given the chance, they will never pay for a meal or a drink in my presence.
Amen to that! I 2nd this statment all the way.
 

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I've had the privilege of knowing MOH recipients and a few others that did/were recognized for acts of valor.

To a person, they questioned why anyone wouldn't have done the same thing that they had done. They couldn't understand how anyone could have walked away from the situation w/o responding as they did.

They all shared a singular mindset of Duty and Responsibility.
 

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Very humbling to meet a Medal of Honor recipient.

Most recipients however will tell you that "I was just doing my job".

Now that's humble.
I wonder how many of the MOH soldiers thought they were going to die, doing what they did. I imagine most. They can be as humble as they want to be, that's certified HERO to me and given the chance, they will never pay for a meal or a drink in my presence.

Excerpt from wikipedia , on Lt. Col. Wal Marm

"Although severely wounded, when his grenades were expended, armed with only a rifle, he continued the momentum of his assault on the position and killed the remainder of the enemy."


Yeah, He's eating for free if I'm around!!!



Moral courage is the most valuable and usually the most absent characteristic in men." - General George S. Patton
 

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Here is a summary of the Medal of Honor citation for his actions on 14 Nov, 1965, in the Ia Drang Valley as member of 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st aircav division. Some might recognize this as the site of the battle portrayed in the recent film We Were Soliders.



First Lieutenant Marm's official Medal of Honor citation reads:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. As a platoon leader in the 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 1st Lt. Marm demonstrated indomitable courage during a combat operation.

His company was moving through the valley to relieve a friendly unit surrounded by an enemy force of estimated regimental size. 1st Lt. Marm led his platoon through withering fire until they were finally forced to take cover.

Realizing that his platoon could not hold very long, and seeing four enemy soldiers moving into his position, he moved quickly under heavy fire and annihilated all 4.

Then, seeing that his platoon was receiving intense fire from a concealed machine gun, he deliberately exposed himself to draw its fire. Thus locating its position, he attempted to destroy it with an antitank weapon. Although he inflicted casualties, the weapon did not silence the enemy fire.

Quickly, disregarding the intense fire directed on him and his platoon, he charged 30 meters across open ground, and hurled grenades into the enemy position, killing some of the 8 insurgents manning it.

Although severely wounded, when his grenades were expended, armed with only a rifle, he continued the momentum of his assault on the position and killed the remainder of the enemy.

1st Lt. Marm's selfless actions reduced the fire on his platoon, broke the enemy assault, and rallied his unit to continue toward the accomplishment of this mission. 1st Lt. Marm's gallantry on the battlefield and his extraordinary intrepidity at the risk of his life are in the highest traditions of the U.S. Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.​
 

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It is indeed an honor to meet a Medal of Honor winner.

The one I met is a WWII Vet who earned his at Iwo Jima. His name is Woody Williams
 

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We have a guy who lives about 20min from me that recieved the MOH for actions in Vietnam. Never met him, and from what I know from people who have, he is extremely humble.

I do know that he gets hundreds, if not thousands of requests to speak at schools or events each year.
 
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