Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I wasn't sure where the best place to post this might be, so Mods please move it if it should be better suited for a different board.

I have a quick question that my own research is only sending me in circles.

I know a local business owner that is wanting to hire Executive Protection/Bodyguard Service, but wants it to be an in house employee rather than contract out to an outside firm. Obviously, this is to save on the expense of an outside contractor.

The thing is...I can find regulations for these services in St. Louis and Kansas City, but nothing else. I can't seem to find any regulations on Licenses or Certifications that the company or the Bodyguard has to posess and maintain.

I see that to own a security firm that offers these services to others, there are some requirements and liability issues. I can't find anything, anywhere, on using your own staff (except for firearms issues like having a CCW endorsement).

If anyone can point me to some good information about this or has any special knowledge of what might be required, please let me know. I've ran out of search terms and only keep finding "schools" that claim to teach classes in other states for Missouri Executive Protection. Most of them seem to be diploma mills instead of reputable firms.

My sincere appreciation!

Scott P.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,645 Posts
First, I have done Dignitary Protection Detail. There is a lot that goes into it if it is to be done properly. There are schools that teach it and do a great job of pointing out the fatal flaws in the job.

As to can someone within a company do it. Sure. If it is part of the job description, yes. If the employer tells an employee to shine his shoes, would you ask if it can be done? One does what one is told to do as long as it is not sexual or degrading.

Most of the time, it is routine and simply using common sense. Depending on the person, the business and other things, one could end up getting their rear ends whipped regularly. There is a lot more to this type work than walking around wearing a firearm.

In Iraq, you would make a quarter million a year. In the US, depending on the nature of the business, you could make $50,000 a year.


My question is why would the man feel he needs personal protection.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,512 Posts
First off, welcome to the forum.

So this local business owner wants Executive Protection, but doesn't really want to pay for it? He prefers to get Joe Janitor certified and then give him a .50 an hour pay increase to risk his life for him. If I were the employee I wouldn't walk away from the offer, I'd run as fast as I could.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks "TheGreatGonzo" for that forum link. I haven't come across that forum that I can remember and will check it out this morning.

Thanks as well, "archer51" for your insight. That's why I love communities like this. You can get great advice on both Pro & Con and use that to better inform people based on more than a "hey, I read somewhere" type answer...often from someone that has actually been there. I appreciate your time and advice!

I was kind of looking at it in the same light. As many small business owners are, this one is very cost conscious and while he isn't concerned with initial costs or insurance, he is of the mindset that if he knows and trusts his protector, he feels more secure than bringing someone on board that all he knows is what shows up in a background check.

I do believe he is more concerned for his family than himself, since he could be easily replaced (in his mind) with someone else that could step in and do the same job. As his profile rises, so do potential threats to himself and his family and I believe he is looking for more peace of mind than anything.

I also think, coming from a small business mindset, the "in-house" part was based on how other positions were filled by family or friends that had the skills to do the job. I am aware of some " Special Forces" type friends they might be leaning toward as in house hiring material. Obviously, there would have to be ongoing training and courses designed around Executive Protection for his "team" as it were. I do not believe he is planning for only 1 guy, but for a small security team that grows as his business grows.

My biggest concern for them is the Legal and Liability Ramafications of whatever choice they make! Although I could find no specific requirements or licensures outside 2 Municipalities, I could also not get the thought of liability alone to quit screaming out. I don't even know what types of policies would cover something like that.

Great Point and thanks for such a quick reply.

Anyone else that might want to chime in, please feel free...or if you did and have any other thoughts, please don't hesitate to share them with me as we'll.

I don't have a vested interest in this beyond protecting my friend from making the wrong choices. That, thankfully, allows me to be objective all the way around!

Thanks again,

Scott P.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
My biggest concern for them is the Legal and Liability Ramafications of whatever choice they make!
This concerned me immediately when I read the initial post. By hiring someone "in-house," the quality/competency of the bodyguard will be easy to question if there is ever an incident, and the executive and/or his company will be assuming full responsibility for the bodyguard's actions.

This seems like a tremendous liability to me. If this guy genuinely needs protection, then he should contract it out to professionals who are trained and competent, and who are properly credentialed and insured.

This is not the kind of job you want done on the cheap--try to do it that way and you may end up spending more money than you ever imagined.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This concerned me immediately when I read the initial post. By hiring someone "in-house," the quality/competency of the bodyguard will be easy to question if there is ever an incident, and the executive and/or his company will be assuming full responsibility for the bodyguard's actions.

This seems like a tremendous liability to me. If this guy genuinely needs protection, then he should contract it out to professionals who are trained and competent, and who are properly credentialed and insured.

This is not the kind of job you want done on the cheap--try to do it that way and you may end up spending more money than you ever imagined.
This is a great point and may help me persuade him to find a good service he can trust and stick with that route. He is not good at letting "outsiders" into his family's lives, but in this case, it would seem to be the best option. After all, he can vet the company's and employees for as long as he wants until he's comfortable with his choice!

Thanks again!

Scott P
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
One of the premises of modern day security force operations is that contracting is less expensive than proprietary. I didn't realize this extended to executive protection services as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Chad,

I'm with you on that. I actually thought in house employees would ultimately be more cost effective.

Go Figure! :rolleyes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,046 Posts
I think the size and type of business is going to be an important factor in determining to use a hired outside protection firm or having your own security detail within the company.

At this stage, if the business is a small "mom & pop" type business, it is probably most cost efficent to contract that type of service with an established security firm.

If this is a company which has a potential to grow with a large number of employees, then he may wish to look into creating a company operated security detail. Adding your own security employees can be done at a later date as the company grows and has a demand for such services.

In the mean time, and while the business is on a small scale, it will likely be best (financially, as well as with liability) to contract with professionals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,563 Posts
You get what you pay for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,571 Posts
If he's got the scratch... He might do very well to seek out Gavin De Becker's firm.

Professional. PERIOD.

Amongst the books Mr. De Becker has written are The Gift Of Fear (in my sig line), and, Just 2 Seconds. A pricey book that addresses security professionals, the details of the work. And has over 100 case studies of assassinations and attempts, explaining the Title of the book.


If he needs security of the personal sort, De Becker's firm delivers. (from related experience).


Yeah, I got tapatalk, too. So what?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,172 Posts
If this "executive" who wants protection has no personal experience and little to no knowledge in the field of executive protection, I strongly recommend that that he not expand his business into the area of executive protection even if it is for himself and his family. There is much more involved in operating a professional 24/7/365 security detail than telling a guy to "protect these people at all times." Here is who this "executive" should call Private Security Firm - Threat Assessment Systems | Gavin de Becker & Associates
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks 1MoreGoodGuy. It looks like he is going to need to outsource for the best protection. That is the general consensus, anyway.

I have discovered that what he had in mind is more of a "bodyguard" than a security detail. I guess maybe Executive Protection covers a more broad area than I intended from my first post.

Thanks again to ALL for excellent advice!

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
I would pose this question to your friend:
- If he wanted one new building, would he contract an architect or hire someone in-house?
- If he wanted an alarm installed, would he contract or hire in-house?
- If he wanted a hardcar built, would he contract or hire in-house?

I can see a different answer to these if he were building twenty new facilities/alarm systems/hardcars.

Not that I wouldn't be interested in seeing his Mercedes done up in hillbilly armor. Heck, I'd do it for less than the cost of a contract hardcar if he ships it to me. My welds may not be pretty, but they hold. And I guarantee he'd have a one-of-a-kind ride!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42,899 Posts
Check the legalities of it. Providing "armed security" for someone (anyone) else may exceed the bounds of a personally issued carry permit. It does in FL, requires a different license.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
NH_Esau, you make a great point in a humorous way. I always like people that can state the obvious in those types of terms! :rolleyes:

OldVet, that's the strange thing. In Missouri, there only seems to be legal requirements in certain cities and municipalities. Outside of those, it seems like the Wild West in terms of law. Kind of strange since almost every other state, from what I can tell, requires a special security license or a PI's license.

Thanks guys!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,172 Posts
You should contact the Missouri Attorney General's office and ask what the legal requirements are for your State and make sure they cite the specific laws for your own reference. If they tell you there are no legal requirements and/or no laws to cite, request a signed letter from the Attorney General's office that states what they told you verbally.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top