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Discussion Starter #1
I am partial to Colt but open to suggestions. I would like a old western classic wheel gun that would take the abuse of alot of range use, just for fun!

Should I only consider a .45 or others!

What models should I research? Perhaps a reissue?

Would be
looking for new or slightly used gun, a true classic will be out of my price range.
 

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I picked up a new Classic series S&W Model 29 for my birthday, love it.
The .44 rounds get a little pricey to shoot and it's a bit heavy for carry, but for pure fun at the range, you can't beat it.
I paid around $825.00 for it, but I'm worth it.:yup:
 

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A Ruger Vaquero will fit your needs perfectly.
 

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Heritage Big Bores are a good solid gun and not overly priced. Made by Pietta and for sale around 400 at stores. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I picked up a new Classic series S&W Model 29 for my birthday, love it.
The .44 rounds get a little pricey to shoot and it's a bit heavy for carry, but for pure fun at the range, you can't beat it.
I paid around $825.00 for it, but I'm worth it.:yup:
Any pics?
 

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Sweet. I've got an old west style single action revolver in 22lr and has a 22 magnum cylinder as well. Fun to shoot and affordable to shoot all day every day. The same action, but small caliber.
 

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A Ruger Vaquero will fit your needs perfectly.
Concur. Rugers will take abuse. For a range gun I would go with 357 due to cheap 38 spl bullets
 

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When I saw the word "abuse" in the original post, well, that limits the selection to Ruger, period. Blackhawks are sturdiest, original Vaqueros perhaps just as sturdy, and New Vaqueros still sturdy, but not able to tolerate over-pressure handloads. Of course, if the abuse comes from being knocked around, then the original Vaqueros and New Vaqueros have no rear sight blades to damage. But, then, the Vaqueros, original and New, have front sights that are more difficult to replace if damaged, compared to Blackhawks' pinned sights.

USFA guns are indeed great guns, but being traditional in design, can be cumulatively damaged by folks who don't understand the manual of arms.
 

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Rugergirl that's pretty!

No Colt recomendations?
Not really a Colt fan, but S&W has also reissued the Model 27 in the Classic Series. My local Fun Shop had one, I looked at it, my knees wobbled, drool dribbled out of the corner of my mouth and then I saw the price tag $1289.99. It was gone three days later though. And no it's not in my safe:frown:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
When I saw the word "abuse" in the original post, well, that limits the selection to Ruger, period. Blackhawks are sturdiest, original Vaqueros perhaps just as sturdy, and New Vaqueros still sturdy, but not able to tolerate over-pressure handloads. Of course, if the abuse comes from being knocked around, then the original Vaqueros and New Vaqueros have no rear sight blades to damage. But, then, the Vaqueros, original and New, have front sights that are more difficult to replace if damaged, compared to Blackhawks' pinned sights.


USFA guns are indeed great guns, but being traditional in design, can be cumulatively damaged by folks who don't understand the manual of arms.
By abuse I only meant alot of loads fired with dependability and not alot of part replacement.
 

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No Colt recomendations?
Colt and abuse do not belong in the same conversation.

Fanning will ruin a Colt (or USFA) quicker that it will ruin a New Model Ruger. It is not good for a Ruger, either, but a Ruger will last longer with such abuse, and replacement parts are MUCH cheaper.

The finish typical of Colts is part of why they are so expensive. Better to abuse a more utilitarian finish, available on certain USFAs, and Rugers. Stainless Rugers can be buffed out, or bead-blasted, time and again.

With Colts and USFAs, one must know how to manage the hammer, or the internal parts can clash, and the cylinder can become ringed.

I own single action sixguns by Colt, USFA, and Ruger. If I want to intentionally abuse one, for some reason, I will do it with one of the Rugers. I do not equate field carry with abuse; none of mine are true safe queens that I plan to keep minty indefinitely.
 

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By abuse I only meant alot of loads fired with dependability and not alot of part replacement.
OK, that is not abuse! :smile: Colts can handle plenty of normal-pressure loads. By design, Rugers will last longer, but that is true of Ruger DA sixguns, too. SA Rugers made after 1973 have the "New Model" lockwork, with parts geometry that makes them sturdier than traditional Colts and USFAs, and they use coil springs, which by nature are longer-lasting than flat springs.
 

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A quick word on ringing of the cylinder: It is normal for New Model Rugers to have a ring scribed around the cylinder, at the notches. just as it is normal in most modern DA revolvers. Colt SA sixguns, and the faithful traditional clones/replicas, will only scratch a ring into the cylinder if the hammer is not managed properly, or the lockwork is out of time.

When a Colt SAA or other traditional-design SA sixgun is cocked at all, it should be brought to FULL cock before the hammer is lowered. Only lower the hammer from full-cock. Loading is accomplished at half-cock, of course, but once the weapon is loaded, the hammer should be brought to full cock, then lowered. This will become second nature after a bit. BTW, double-check that the chamber under the hammer is empty by looking for daylight showing from one side of the pistol to the other. No need to look into the front of the cylinder.
 
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