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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone I need help finding reloading data for my LRN 95gr. .380acp
I have on hand Bullseye and Unique powder.
The only data I can find in my 3 manuals is for a 90gr. bullet.
 

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Here is a tip for you.

You have to have a chrony.

You don't need load data, per se. What you need to understand is what "energy range" that caliber, in X " barrel, operates in. For .380 it typical operates in the energy range of 180-220 lbs. So...with a chrony, you just load until your in between that range, and there you have it...you are your own load book.

Take a look at this image..using 34 different powders, with 9MM for example. 124 grain bullets. This is FPS, but you can see...with a 4.5" barrel, the range is from about 1000 FPS, and ~1175 FPS with pretty much everything. Every caliber has a FPS or energy range it operates in. Using powders suited for that caliber, there will be no exceptions...the loads will be in this range.
 

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Here is a tip for you.

You have to have a chrony.

You don't need load data, per se. What you need to understand is what "energy range" that caliber, in X " barrel, operates in. For .380 it typical operates in the energy range of 180-220 lbs. So...with a chrony, you just load until your in between that range, and there you have it...you are your own load book.

Take a look at this image..using 34 different powders, with 9MM for example. 124 grain bullets. This is FPS, but you can see...with a 4.5" barrel, the range is from about 1000 FPS, and ~1175 FPS with pretty much everything. Every caliber has a FPS or energy range it operates in. Using powders suited for that caliber, there will be no exceptions...the loads will be in this range.
This is some dangerous advice. With this method, how do you know what your starting load is?
 

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More, straight off the internet from Hodgdon:

https://www.hodgdonreloading.com/data/pistol

FWIW, the powder manufacturers do a pretty good job publishing load data. Pistol cal info is pretty thin from the big bullet makers like Sierra.

Also, a small change in weight such as from 90 to 95 grains won't make a big change in the powder charge, especially for the faster-burning powders like Titegroup. The point is that you're not on the hairy edge of an overload, and you could prudently decrease the 90 gr bullt loads by 0.1-0.2 grains as a comfortable starting point.

ETA: Just re-read the post and saw you want to use lead bullets. The Hodgdon info I referenced offers load data for 95 gr jacketed bulleta. You can safely start with the same powder charges shown, and you'll simply get higher velocities with your lead bullets.
 

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here is a good area for 380
Reloading .380 Auto (9mm Kurz) Page

He said Unique. Good powder.

Start at around 3.2 grains, in 380 using 90 grain LRN. Bullseye I would start around 2.5.

If those don't yield you 180 lbs, keep going UP until you get near 200 lbs, then stop.

If you think this is dangerous, here is the best advice you will ever hear in your life.
---> Never, ever, use any combination not in an official load book.

But if you post on the net and want people to assist you? Then your in the danger game huh? I have to say, I laugh when you say its dangerous. What I told you is super pro method.

1) get chrony
2) understand energy/FPS range for that weight bullet with barrel length you have
3) start on what you think is low load, find bottom of energy/FPS range. This is easy. Use correlation to other loads, or 9MM, or whatever.
4) settle on load in middle of range

That is literally, exactly what you need to do when its not published.
I can tell you, any powder that is suitable for 380 or 9mm, a general area where to start. I don't need any book. You just have to understand a few things. Powder burn rate general area, how much this powder does in other, similar calibers..what energy/fps range of this caliber using X barrel length...

Reloading, is so easy, you can literally just take a middle burn rate powder, fill the case exactly HALF full, and try that. OR you could take a SLOW powder for that caliber, fill up case 2/3 and call that starting. OR you could take a fast powder fill up case 1/3 and call that good. This only applies to powders with a burn rate suited for that caliber like 9mm or 380, etc. NOT RIFLES. No need to overthink it, this is super easy. You need chrony, and common sense. Common sense increases with experience. If you are a total beginner, back to the best advice of all time:

---> Never, ever, use any combination not in an official load book. And please, ignore all people on the internet.
Or, just have somebody else teach you, in person, how to load and test.

I have taught many people.

haha. easy.
 

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here is a good area for 380
Reloading .380 Auto (9mm Kurz) Page

He said Unique. Good powder.

Start at around 3.2 grains, in 380 using 90 grain LRN. Bullseye I would start around 2.5.

If those don't yield you 180 lbs, keep going UP until you get near 200 lbs, then stop.

If you think this is dangerous, here is the best advice you will ever hear in your life.
---> Never, ever, use any combination not in an official load book.

But if you post on the net and want people to assist you? Then your in the danger game huh? I have to say, I laugh when you say its dangerous. What I told you is super pro method.

1) get chrony
2) understand energy/FPS range for that weight bullet with barrel length you have
3) start on what you think is low load, find bottom of energy/FPS range. This is easy. Use correlation to other loads, or 9MM, or whatever.
4) settle on load in middle of range

That is literally, exactly what you need to do when its not published.
I can tell you, any powder that is suitable for 380 or 9mm, a general area where to start. I don't need any book. You just have to understand a few things. Powder burn rate general area, how much this powder does in other, similar calibers..what energy/fps range of this caliber using X barrel length...

Reloading, is so easy, you can literally just take a middle burn rate powder, fill the case exactly HALF full, and try that. OR you could take a SLOW powder for that caliber, fill up case 2/3 and call that starting. OR you could take a fast powder fill up case 1/3 and call that good. This only applies to powders with a burn rate suited for that caliber like 9mm or 380, etc. NOT RIFLES. No need to overthink it, this is super easy. You need chrony, and common sense. Common sense increases with experience. If you are a total beginner, back to the best advice of all time:

---> Never, ever, use any combination not in an official load book. And please, ignore all people on the internet.
Or, just have somebody else teach you, in person, how to load and test.

I have taught many people.

haha. easy.
That is exactly how I would create a load "IF" I was using a Test Barrel with pressure transducers and in a Ballistics Lab. But not the way I would go about it with my face behind the slide of a hand held gun.

Let someone with a Ballistics lab do the easy work! And I'll stick to published data. I even look at several data sources to be sure someone didn't make a mistake in transferring the info. DR
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Here is a tip for you.

You have to have a chrony.

You don't need load data, per se. What you need to understand is what "energy range" that caliber, in X " barrel, operates in. For .380 it typical operates in the energy range of 180-220 lbs. So...with a chrony, you just load until your in between that range, and there you have it...you are your own load book.

Take a look at this image..using 34 different powders, with 9MM for example. 124 grain bullets. This is FPS, but you can see...with a 4.5" barrel, the range is from about 1000 FPS, and ~1175 FPS with pretty much everything. Every caliber has a FPS or energy range it operates in. Using powders suited for that caliber, there will be no exceptions...the loads will be in this range.
This is some dangerous advice. With this method, how do you know what your starting load is?
exactly! I need to see it in a manual or manufacture website for me to trust and use it.
 

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I'm using a 95gr bullet, the data I found was for a 90gr. So i cant use it
Whenever there is data that is close to the bullet I have, I back off 10% and rework the load. I’d consider a 5gr spread in bullet weight close to your specific bullet.

I would worry about using Unique in 380 though as it doesn’t meter well, and those flakes are apt to do some funny things to volume in such a small case. If you’re weighing every charge, then you should be ok. But I’d be hesitant to load them in a progressive.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
More, straight off the internet from Hodgdon:

https://www.hodgdonreloading.com/data/pistol

FWIW, the powder manufacturers do a pretty good job publishing load data. Pistol cal info is pretty thin from the big bullet makers like Sierra.

Also, a small change in weight such as from 90 to 95 grains won't make a big change in the powder charge, especially for the faster-burning powders like Titegroup. The point is that you're not on the hairy edge of an overload, and you could prudently decrease the 90 gr bullt loads by 0.1-0.2 grains as a comfortable starting point.

ETA: Just re-read the post and saw you want to use lead bullets. The Hodgdon info I referenced offers load data for 95 gr jacketed bulleta. You can safely start with the same powder charges shown, and you'll simply get higher velocities with your lead bullets.
thank you
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm using a 95gr bullet, the data I found was for a 90gr. So i cant use it
Whenever there is data that is close to the bullet I have, I back off 10% and rework the load. I’d consider a 5gr spread in bullet weight close to your specific bullet.

I would worry about using Unique in 380 though as it doesn’t meter well, and those flakes are apt to do some funny things to volume in such a small case. If you’re weighing every charge, then you should be ok. But I’d be hesitant to load them in a progressive.
Thank you. I will be taking my time and weighing each case
 

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Hey bro, you were Marines? Me too.

You can use 90 grn data for 95, its only going to be about .1 grain different. You can use it, especially when your doing low loads.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

And to the other guy, lets see, Dangerranger. What you stated is a myth. It does not exist. Don't believe videos you see or people posting on the internet saying "dont blow my face off" its a myth, a joke, its not real. You must have read about a Beretta 92fs in the 80's failing and the slide hit the Navy Seal in the face. That is where all this myth started. That had 0% to do with the load, and just a gun failure from abuse and wear and tear. There has never been, ever, in this Universe, or the Marvel Universe, ever, a slide hitting anyone in the face from an overcharged load. Gunshop near me tested this for laughs. And it was funny. SO many people on the internet just are so paranoid about loading just .1 above SAMMI or whatever. .1? Try loading 25 GRAINS+ of TITEGROUP in a Rifle.

They took TITEGROUP, and filled up, straight up DIPPED IT to full, and put a 55 grain bullet in there, shot it in an AR15. ZERO blow up of anyone's face. The bolt carrier group cracked, thats it. Minor damage. That was probably 200k PSI.

I have a pretty advanced lab right here. And every powder. 60+ different bullets, every brand case, everything you could ever want to test. I been testing for years and years. My opinion is..SAMMI killed reloading. People are just hypnotized by it. You should see the VV loadbook #1. The loads are like +PPPPPP. Its amazing how those guys back before SAMMI lived, you would think they all have metal in their faces, or their noses flat from so many slides hitting their face. Ok that was a joke.

Back in the old days, what we consider maximum loads? Were starting loads in some cases. This is no exaggeration. And also, guns back then were not made as quality as today. Steel is far better now. Guns now, are vastly more stout.
 

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Hey bro, you were Marines? Me too.

You can use 90 grn data for 95, its only going to be about .1 grain different. You can use it, especially when your doing low loads.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

And to the other guy, lets see, Dangerranger. What you stated is a myth. It does not exist. Don't believe videos you see or people posting on the internet saying "dont blow my face off" its a myth, a joke, its not real. You must have read about a Beretta 92fs in the 80's failing and the slide hit the Navy Seal in the face. That is where all this myth started. That had 0% to do with the load, and just a gun failure from abuse and wear and tear. There has never been, ever, in this Universe, or the Marvel Universe, ever, a slide hitting anyone in the face from an overcharged load. Gunshop near me tested this for laughs. And it was funny. SO many people on the internet just are so paranoid about loading just .1 above SAMMI or whatever. .1? Try loading 25 GRAINS+ of TITEGROUP in a Rifle.

They took TITEGROUP, and filled up, straight up DIPPED IT to full, and put a 55 grain bullet in there, shot it in an AR15. ZERO blow up of anyone's face. The bolt carrier group cracked, thats it. Minor damage. That was probably 200k PSI.

I have a pretty advanced lab right here. And every powder. 60+ different bullets, every brand case, everything you could ever want to test. I been testing for years and years. My opinion is..SAMMI killed reloading. People are just hypnotized by it. You should see the VV loadbook #1. The loads are like +PPPPPP. Its amazing how those guys back before SAMMI lived, you would think they all have metal in their faces, or their noses flat from so many slides hitting their face. Ok that was a joke.

Back in the old days, what we consider maximum loads? Were starting loads in some cases. This is no exaggeration. And also, guns back then were not made as quality as today. Steel is far better now. Guns now, are vastly more stout.
If you spend enough time on a shooting range you will see guns come apart! We have all seen them, It's not a Myth. I know people who everyday over load their ammo, and point to there guns and say "See, nothing happened!" But soon enough they are trading there revolver off because its frame is stretched. I have seen the lugs on bolts battered till the head space has opened. Again from pushing their ammo to places it shouldn't go.
I'm not saying don't work up to max loads , or even never go over the max book load, But don't tell people how safe it is to fill a case with a fast powder like Tight group and nothing bad will happen. When you said your self that it broke the bolt carrier!
As a mater of fact, If we ever meet at a range, Please don't sit next to me! Just move on down to the end. I'll come down later and take pic's of the carnage! DR
 

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Here is a tip for you.

You have to have a chrony.

You don't need load data, per se. What you need to understand is what "energy range" that caliber, in X " barrel, operates in. For .380 it typical operates in the energy range of 180-220 lbs. So...with a chrony, you just load until your in between that range, and there you have it...you are your own load book.

Take a look at this image..using 34 different powders, with 9MM for example. 124 grain bullets. This is FPS, but you can see...with a 4.5" barrel, the range is from about 1000 FPS, and ~1175 FPS with pretty much everything. Every caliber has a FPS or energy range it operates in. Using powders suited for that caliber, there will be no exceptions...the loads will be in this range.
So just toss some powder in there and hope for the best? Yeah... im probably not going to follow this advice.
 

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I'm using a 95gr bullet, the data I found was for a 90gr. So i cant use it
Sure you can. Just reduce the published weight by a .10gr and you are good.
 

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I seen guns come apart, and what I am saying is they are NOT coming apart from HOT loads. They are coming apart, almost always, from impediments in the barrel/breach, or other things such as this. You have no proof of your claims loading "barely" higher will make your slide go into your face. There is zero evidence, no proof, its a myth. You believe things you have not seen, and just heard. Just rumors. its like bigfoot. I did not say it was safe to load a 223 FULL of titegroup. You said that. I dont think reloading is your thing, its too dangerous for you. You do understand it is not possible to load the exact same pressure from all the books right? Barrels are different, powder lots, tolerances, etc. What book says is 33k pressure, could be 35 in your gun. So watch out, and don't blow your face off.
 
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