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Hello everyone I just got my ccw permit, and I’m trying to find a good deal on a high quality pistol that will work well for an IWB carry. I found a Kahr K40 with four mags, two holsters, and a mag holster for $500. Is this a good deal? How do you guys feel about the pistol as far as quality, reliability, accuracy, and weight?

Thanks for helping me out :smile:
 

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That is a good price, and an excellent pistol. I'd rather have the 9mm, but there is nothing wrong with the 40.

The quality is excellent, it will be far more accurate than you or I will ever be. It is a little on the heavy side, but its not bad at all with a decent holster/belt combo.
 

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Thats a great deal. If you can, .. see if there is a range or a friend that has K40 to shoot. I found .40 a tad lively for me in that package. I would rather go with 9mm. But .40 is fine , I just never commited to practice with that round.
 

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Sounds like a winner to me. I have the Kahr CW9 and it's a excellent cc pistol too. Grab it up before it's gone.
 

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+1

I don't have a Kahr, but have shot the .40 you are looking at. It is easily concealable and kinda fun to shoot. Heck, if you figure out that you don't like the snappiness of a .40 round, you can always trade the gun in or sell it. The price is right. Get it while you can!

Reg
 

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Great deal... snatch it.
 

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Good choice

The Kahr K40 works well IWB as it is a thin, compact pistol. It is heavier than you might suspect because of its all steel construction, but this helps on the recoil side when you fire it. I have the smaller 9mm version MK9, and it is very concealable, has a good trigger, and is quite accurate. So I think the K40 would be a good IWB choice. Take a look at Comp-Tac holsters, made of thin, strong kydex.
 

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That does sound like a good deal! Bet you'd be happier with a Glock though. I'm just sayin'. Good luck no matter what you do.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I really like how it feels. I’m dying to start training with it, but I’m having trouble finding a good amount of ammo that won’t cost as much as the gun did(just like everyone is else I am sure). Which reminds me, why does ammo cost SOOO much? I’ve been shooting nearly my whole life and have delt with ammo cost(never as expensive as it is now of coures) for a long time, but I have never understood why it’s so expensive. I have never done any reloading, but I seems like the supplies would be pretty cheap and machines could do most of the work. It’s probably a stupid question, but can anyone explain to me why the cost is so high?
 

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It’s probably a stupid question, but can anyone explain to me why the cost is so high?
Not a stupid question, but it has been asked and answered here and other forums many times over the past year. Short answer: supply and demand.

Following the election of last November, a lot of folks who realize that Obama is not a friend of the Second Amendment decided to make the gun purchase they'd been putting off. Those of us already "into" guns and shooting started stocking up on ammo in case 'O' put some 'czar' in charge of limiting gun sales or whatever... The overall mentality was "buy what you need now, because availability may be severely limited down the road."

Preceding that frenzy was an overall increase in worldwise cost of the metals used to make ammo - copper, tin, and lead. Due to competition in commodity markets alone, ammo prices suffered a quantum increase in 2007-8, BUT what few people recognize is that ammo prices were low for over a decade. I paid $125 for a case of .45 ball for a course I took in 1993, and that price was not exceeded for almost 15 years.

The worldwide economic recession has driven commodity metal prices down, but ammo supply hasn't kept up with demand over the past year so there's been no attenuation in prices. Practice ammo is still in the 30-40 cents per round range, with defensive ammo close to a buck a round for the latest sexy stuff. So be smart about your training regimen - make each shot count for something!

And before I forget, congrats on the K40. That's a fine handgun and the all-steel construction feels good in my hand. Get used to the trigger break with a lot of dry firing.
 

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I'm sure you will really enjoy it. Kahr's are of excellent quality, ideal for CC and really fit one's hand very well. I currently carry a Kahr K9. You made a really good deal, the gun alone retails for about $800.00.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks, Gasmitty, that makes a lot of sense.

Get used to the trigger break with a lot of dry firing.
How can you tell what handguns are safe to dry fire? I heard that you should never dry fire a center fire, but as far as center fire pistols go are there certain brands that are ok to do it with, or a certain year forward? What would happen if a handgun that shouldn't be dry fired is dry fired constantly?

That's for all the help and inputs, guys.
 

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How can you tell what handguns are safe to dry fire? I heard that you should never dry fire a center fire, but as far as center fire pistols go are there certain brands that are ok to do it with, or a certain year forward? What would happen if a handgun that shouldn't be dry fired is dry fired constantly?
Most modern centerfire handguns and rifles are OK with dry firing - you won't hurt a thing. Most repeating shotguns fall into the same category. Double-barrelled shotguns and high-end singles (like some trap guns) should never be dry fired without snap caps.

Rimfire guns are an entirely different story. All rimfire Rugers across the board are OK with dry firing, but that's about the biggest generalization one can make. The problem with rimfires is that the firing pin is oriented to pinch the brass cartridge rim against the edge of the chamber. If the cartridge is mising, the edge of the chamber gets whacked instead, which either peens the chamber mouth or damages the firing pin, usually the former.

Back to centerfires - dry firing a gun for which it's not recommended can damage the firing pin itself, or surfaces inside the bolt or frame or slide which absorb the force of the firing pin if it doesn't hit a primer. Most semiauto handguns have 'floating' firing pins and rebounding hammers these days which lessen the likelihood of any damage from dry firing.

Dry fire your Kahr as much as you like!
 
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