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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With all this talk on the forum about 1911's, my old urge to have a 1911 was rekindled. I think I'll blame QKShooter for his thoughtful comments about the 1911 on another thread. So the story is this: there has been a Kimber resting in the local dealer's case for a few weeks now. Maybe a couple of months even. When I stop by, I ogle it a bit, remark on how well it points, and the nice trigger pull. I think the dealer knew it was a matter of time, he saw me weakening. But it's not a gun I need; I kept hoping that it would be sold and I would be delivered from temptation. Not to be.



Weapon feels great, but is quite tight, at least as compared to some other 1911's I have shot. I picked up a couple rounds of ammunition and would like to start breaking it in tomorrow. I would like a little advice from the 1911 gurus first, if I may, about breaking it in. On another thread, someone said they liked shooting the weapon until it was as dirty as they could possible stand before breaking it down and cleaning it. I typically like to have my weapon clean before I put it away and the notion sounds antithetical to everything my grandfather taught me, if not down right heretical to a military mind.

Do you guys really prefer to break it in dry and dirty, or would it be better to slowly age the pistol with oil and TLC between shooting session?

My one dislike at this point, is the end of the recoil spring cap. It is sharp and difficult to depress without the wrench tool or a spent shell casing. Is there a good replacement for this part?

Offending recoil spring cap:



(I'd also be interested to hear about carry options for IWB, if that is as practical as some people say.)

Thanks in advance! I'm looking forward to learning the 1911 platform more thoroughly.
 

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I recently bought a Sig TacOps and my
break in involved just lubing the rails and firing 100 rounds of Speer Lawman. Not a single issue. I'm not sure I completely buy into all the "break in" processses some people have. Maybe I've just always had that one gem where I've never had an issue.
 

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Any gun I buy I field strip it, and wipe it down. Run a few patches through the barrel and give it a standard lube. A t that point IMO it is ready to be put through it's paces. That is all I did with my SA Loaded Champion and my Dan Wesson CBOB.
 
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Congrats on your new pistol! Sure is a sweet looking 1911.

I'll normally clean a new gun thoroughly before shooting it for the first time, but with a Para 1911 SSP I recently acquired I took it out of the box and pumped 250 rounds of 230 FMJ through it without any preparation... ran like a clock and got a good cleaning afterwards.

With a full length guide rod, you're pretty much stuck with that style of plug and the need for a tool to painlessly strip/re-assemble the pistol. You could put a standard/short guide rod in and use a common knurled plug if you wish. The debate over short vs. FLGR's is one of those no-win arguements.
 
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IWB carry, get a quality leather holster and you'll s have no problems. I love my Milt Sparks VM II, and I own a Brigade Gunleather M 11, although its not for my 1911, would work great for a 1911. The toughest part to hide, as in all handguns, is the grip. I find mine conceals well at the 3:00-3:30 position. The single stack mitigates the larger size fairly well. I believe my 1911 hides better than my HK P2000SK, but I have the 7 round smaller handled frame for my 1911 (Sig 1911 RCS).
 

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After talking with some of our more knowledgeable members here, I'm going to try the following with my next 1911.

Clean it, lube it up and shoot it. When it starts getting fouled and gritty, lube it up again and keep shooting it (don't clean it yet). The logic is that the grit helps smooth out the components.
 

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I just cleaned up my recent Colt, lubed it and shot it. Maybe bring a little bit of oil with you just incase you want to add a few drops after a 100 rounds or so.

I think Glockman10mm just had a thread recently where he let his new 1911 run 500rnds & get plenty dirty before the first time he cleaned it, only adding oil every so often and it worked out pretty good..

That's a nice kimber, is that the TLE with the full steel frame ?
 

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Congrats on the new acquisition. You've already gotten great advice. Don't worry about "break-in." Just give it a good first-time cleaning/lubing and then shoot it. Clean as necessary (but it won't be necessary as often as you may think). 1911s don't need the TLC that many people seem to think they do (this was discussed in a thread that I believe is still running). Just relax and enjoy owning/shooting it.

Edit: What were you thinking, buying a Kimber??? Don't you know that thing will blow up in your face? (Sarcasm off).
 

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That's a nice looker, and I have heard good things about the TLE.

The way I do it is too give it an initial cleaning and inspection
Lube it well on the rails, barrel and slide lugs, bushing, barrel, and that's it.

Then put it back together, and function check it by letting the slide go home on an empty chamber to make sure the hammer doesn't fall. Recock hammer and check safety's.

Then shoot it for at least 200-300 before you clean it, maybe 50-100rounds per range session.
Clean and enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks!

After talking with some of our more knowledgeable members here, I'm going to try the following with my next 1911.

Clean it, lube it up and shoot it. When it starts getting fouled and gritty, lube it up again and keep shooting it (don't clean it yet). The logic is that the grit helps smooth out the components.
See, that freaks me out....but I'm intrigued.

That's a nice kimber, is that the TLE with the full steel frame ?
Yes, I should have mentioned that: TLE/RL II. I liked the full steel frame, night sights, Kimber quality components, and the rubber grips (nice and tactile). Great trigger. The rail I have mixed feelings about: lacks some of the nostalgic appeal of the Colt's, Springer's, and new Remington R1, but I don't have another gun with a rail and thought it might be handy at some point to get a light for it. Will need to cogitate on that for a while. I like the weight of the steel frame. I also like the long guide rod, but didn't realize I'd be stuck with the recoil spring cap (see, newbie mistake). I can learn to live with it. Would have been nice of Kimber to include more than one magazine. I picked up a Wilson Combat 8 round mag to try out as well. Very tight fit in the mag well.

I'm going to strip it down, clean it and take it to the range tomorrow. Going to be a warm, but dusty day here. I have 3 different types of ammunition for it, American Eagle FMJ, Corbon +P 185 JHP, and some Golden Sabers. Oh, some Buffalo Bore SWC too. I'll report later on the disastrous performance.

Thanks to everyone for their advice so far. I'll have to research some of the holster suggestions.
 

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Unless the owner's manual says differently, field strip and clean it to remove any manufacturing debris that might be lurking inside, as well as unwanted grease or dirt. Lube it and run it any way you like. I've always followed the idea of running it for 250-500 rounds before cleaning it again. Back when I was younger, you had to run your new car for a certain number of miles below a certain speed limit to allow the working parts to work in to each other. My dad said that first oil change was to get the "lapping compound" out of the engine. I follow a similar philosophy for any new semiautomatic firearms I buy.
 

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If you want to eliminate the sharp edge on the guide rod bushing, I'd say ditch the full-length guide rod for standard "GI"-type parts - which will run you about $20 at Brownells.

Like the others suggested, clean the bore, lube it, and shoot it lots. Lube as necessary, wipe it down after a session, but skip the detail cleaning for several hundred rounds.

Enjoy!
 

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Send it to a Pro the break in is touch and hard to do requires years of training.
Clean it and shoot it nothing more there is no breaking in a gun.
 

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Shoot it, shoot it, shoot it some more. :wink:

I run 500 rounds or so before cleaning a new 1911, just keep lottsa oil on it. Regardless of what you might read, you can't over lube a 1911, the first time you pull the trigger, you'll be covered in a fine oil mist, don't ask me how I know. :tongue:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Cleaned and function checked

Thanks again guys. I like your enthusiasm.

I did clean the pistol today: broke down the slide, but not the frame. Don't think that is critical at this point.



Kudos to Kimber, the weapon was actually very clean. You can see the two pipe cleaners I used. The rag I used had some oil residue on it, nothing more. The gun was essentially ready to go out of the box.

Feed ramp is fairly well polished and nice and clean:



Likewise, the barrel ramp/throat looks good to me:



Reassembly was straight forward, although I'm starting a little "idiot mark"; I think the dealer may have helped with that too. Here with it's little brother (purchased in '89):



Thank you Mr Browning!
 

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I have the same pistol except stainless. It has been a good one. Very accurate. The new Kimbers I have had are pretty tight when right out of the box but they smooth up pretty quick. My warrior was so tight it gave some trouble the first few mags and I was disappointed but I should not have been. After just 3 or 4 mags it has never failed again. I think you will like it a lot.
I have both kydex and leather holsters and like both. I like kydex because it is fast and keeps its shape for re-holster. I like leather because it is not so rough on the finish. Someone makes a kydex with leather lining,can't remember who. That might be the ticket.
 
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