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Glad he came out on the winning end, but he should not have put himself and his wife in danger over a dumb burger at one AM. Like tap dancing in a minefield . . . bad idea, even if it's your "right."
 

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Personally, a couple of statements from the interview caused me some concerns.

"I wish I wasn't at the wrong place at the wrong time, but I'm glad it was me instead of a less-skilled defensive pistol practitioner."
"God may have put this man in front of me for a reason."
My view: (1) Nothing good happens after midnight. Go home. I certainly would not go out for a fast food burger.
(2) I'm not God and taking a life is not God's work. If I have to defend myself, I defend myself, but I don't ascribe to a higher calling involving God. I'm not James Comey.
(3) Don't be cocky. You took man's life in self-defense. You had to defend you and your girlfriend. But don't brag about your skills relative to another person that conceal carries a firearm.

Maybe I'm being picky, but given the hypersensitivity to firearms in the pandemic, let's not feed the anti's narrative.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Personally, a couple of statements from the interview caused me some concerns.





My view: (1) Nothing good happens after midnight. Go home. I certainly would not go out for a fast food burger.
(2) I'm not God and taking a life is not God's work. If I have to defend myself, I defend myself, but I don't ascribe to a higher calling involving God. I'm not James Comey.
(3) Don't be cocky. You took man's life in self-defense. You had to defend you and your girlfriend. But don't brag about your skills relative to another person that conceal carries a firearm.

Maybe I'm being picky, but given the hypersensitivity to firearms in the pandemic, let's not feed the anti's narrative.
I think what he was trying to say was this guy was out looking to shoot someone. I guess he thought a person with less skills or no gun would have gotten themselves killed.
So maybe God put him in front of him to neutralize the evil.
Sure some places are not smart to go into late at night, I do not know this neighborhood. Mixed feelings, neighborhood get bad and unsafe because we allow the criminals to scare us away and they have free range. Like those Muslim no man's lands on European countries. We allow them to get that way.
Last I think if I put 10 shots on target in the heat of a gunfight with zero misses, I would brag a bit.
 

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@OneGunTX those statements don't bother me. They are similar thoughts I've had in other situations in life where I made poor choices, and things worked out fine. I don't know one person alive who doesn't have at least a few moments in life when they look back and wonder, what was I thinking when I made that choice?

I have to respect his being honest about not wanting to see someone else in his place, and not surviving the encounter. To me that shows his humility and compassion towards others. His putting 10 rounds into the attacker was instinctive, and on target. I didn't think he was bragging about that at all.
 

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I was concentrating more on the story of his shooting.
Nine in the chest and one to the central nervous system in about 4 seconds. All hits no misses.
Clearly he needs a better man stopper.:yup:
 

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I think what he was trying to say was this guy was out looking to shoot someone. I guess he thought a person with less skills or no gun would have gotten themselves killed.
So maybe God put him in front of him to neutralize the evil.
Sure some places are not smart to go into late at night, I do not know this neighborhood. Mixed feelings, neighborhood get bad and unsafe because we allow the criminals to scare us away and they have free range. Like those Muslim no man's lands on European countries. We allow them to get that way.
Last I think if I put 10 shots on target in the heat of a gunfight with zero misses, I would brag a bit.

I don't know what Mr. Baldwin was actually thinking as I don't personally know him. My opinion is derived only from his actual statements and taking the statements at face value. I don't read minds. In my opinion, a person that takes a human life should not associate their actions with God's plans, don't brag about being a good gunslinger, and don't knock others that carry. Taking a human life should not be treated lightly. It was necessary. It was lawful. That's all that needs to be said. He's playing into the Anti's narrative. Don't make them right.

Taking another human life is nothing to brag about, not matter how well you place your shots.
 

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I can say this with some degree of certainty. He took the life of another human. At some point in time the reality of that act will invade his consciousness. Only a small percentage of people sit back and never think about what happened and wish it could have gone another way. An even smaller number brag about it and talk about how good they are.

There is a small percentage who find great joy in killing and are generally psychopaths. I am just thankful that I'm not the one this guy may call upon for help one dark night. I lost one police officer who sounded a great deal like this guy before that night of the soul descended, despite doing my level best to stop it.

One thing I am very sure about. God doesn't sit around counting the seconds until someone who we think needs killing is actually obliged. The cost He paid in making a way out for even the most evil among us was far, far too high. And that is about as far as I'll go on the issue of God's part in this.

BTW I should clarify. Having to take a human life in war is one thing, murdering a human, or in a non-wartime situation, is quite another. War is different, even though many people have just as difficult a time handling death.
 

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I can say this with some degree of certainty. He took the life of another human. At some point in time the reality of that act will invade his consciousness. Only a small percentage of people sit back and never think about what happened and wish it could have gone another way. An even smaller number brag about it and talk about how good they are.

There is a small percentage who find great joy in killing and are generally psychopaths. I am just thankful that I'm not the one this guy may call upon for help one dark night. I lost one police officer who sounded a great deal like this guy before that night of the soul descended, despite doing my level best to stop it.

One thing I am very sure about. God doesn't sit around counting the seconds until someone who we think needs killing is actually obliged. The cost He paid in making a way out for even the most evil among us was far, far too high. And that is about as far as I'll go on the issue of God's part in this.

BTW I should clarify. Having to take a human life in war is one thing, murdering a human, or in a non-wartime situation, is quite another. War is different, even though many people have just as difficult a time handling death.
I have never had to take a life. I understand the war thing. I understand the murder thing.
Those who have had to take a life in self defense or defense of a loved one how hard is it to deal with?
What makes it harder or easier? The person you are or the situation and the type of person you had to kill.
I pray I never have to find out but I would be interested in the opinion of those who had to .
My father has killed men in times of war and as a police officer. I am not sure how it affected him. He was a very happy go lucky kind of guy but he never talked about it much.
 

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So we're not allowed to get a burger if we are out late and hungry???? Thinking back to my truck-driving days, sometimes the job or circumstances put us in places some of you all seem too afraid or too smart or whatever to go.
 

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In my opinion, a person that takes a human life should not associate their actions with God's plans

He's playing into the Anti's narrative. Don't make them right.
I would most likely say the same thing about it being God's plan should I need to shoot someone. Like Mr. Baldwin, I am not a person looking for trouble. Trouble came to him, and God had given him the wisdom to be prepared to handle that type of trouble. It was meant to be what it was for whatever reason. God put a capable person in the path of a monster, and good people will not be harmed by that monster.

As for the second part about the antis. Well, everything he did makes them angry. They hate Christianity and all it stands for. Nothing on this Earth can ever make them right. Their misguided beliefs are based on fear, and are emotionally driven. Had they been there, they would be dead. What they think matters not.
 

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Great story with a good ending...like the vid. I wonder if that's his own gun collection behind him.
 
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I have never had to take a life. I understand the war thing. I understand the murder thing.
Those who have had to take a life in self defense or defense of a loved one how hard is it to deal with?
What makes it harder or easier? The person you are or the situation and the type of person you had to kill.
I pray I never have to find out but I would be interested in the opinion of those who had to .
My father has killed men in times of war and as a police officer. I am not sure how it affected him. He was a very happy go lucky kind of guy but he never talked about it much.
To tell you the truth, I am not aware of anything that makes it harder or easier to bear. I know that justification is the best factor to help the person deal with it. If you have to take a life to protect a life (even if it is yours) and you have no choice, no other means available, that seems to make things easier for the person to "file away" the event. In short, "It was all I could do, I did the best I knew how, I didn't want this to happen, but I just had no choice. Now I'm going home to my family." People who can honestly say that to themselves seem to handle it much better.

That is similar to what physicians face at times, although many face so much death that it all seems to blur together. Still, at times, they feel guilt because they lost a patient. It helps to assure them of the same justifications we use with police officers and the military.

Another group that feels this very keenly are people who work in Hospice care. Physicians, nurses, Social Workers and chaplains all run into the feeling constantly. The only thing that helps this group is the understanding that ALL of their patients are dying. Making each day the best day of a patient's life for them and their families helps to keep the wolf at bay.

A lot of veterans have been taught to internalize the issues and to try and "compartmentalize" the after effects. I think that was an unspoken "treatment" that still exists today. "Just lock those feelings up. Don't talk about what you experienced." Tragically, that strategy usually makes the problem worse down the road, although many seem to finally tuck it so deep they never think about it again.

Chaplains also have problems with this as well, although it sometimes feels worse because when we lose one, they are lost for eternity. That's as far as I can go with that.

As you can imagine, this is a hugely simplistic explanation.
 

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A lot of veterans have been taught to internalize the issues and to try and "compartmentalize" the after effects. I think that was an unspoken "treatment" that still exists today. "Just lock those feelings up. Don't talk about what you experienced." Tragically, that strategy usually makes the problem worse down the road, although many seem to finally tuck it so deep they never think about it again.
I've never been able to grasp the scope of the PTSB issue, never having to deal with it myself. With 100% accurate hindsight though, I can remember many of the WWII and Korean war Veterans in the neighborhood I grew up in having alcohol problems, my own dad included. Some managed to keep it under control; some, like the father of my best friend, never seemed to come to grips with that demon that stalked them all the remainder of their years. It took many years for me to add 2 + 2 and come up with they suffered from shell shock, the 1000-yard stare, or PTSB as it is called today. One fellow who was my second dad was known to be a great father and provider--for all of three-four months until one drink would send him off into a binge for a week, and then a search for a new job would begin.

Just a thought that hit me while I read some post here. I'm sure most of us would like to think we've prepared ourselves to defend ourselves at all costs, but until it happens . . . well, I figure these WWII and Korea Vets all thought the same.
 

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@OldVet ....and EVERYONE...IF the worst happens, the only thing on earth that could be worse is to not seek competent professional help. It doesn't mean you're any less a man or hero if you need someone who can walk beside you and talk it out.
 
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@OldVet ....and EVERYONE...IF the worst happens, the only thing on earth that could be worse is to not seek competent professional help. It doesn't mean you're any less a man or hero if you need someone who can walk beside you and talk it out.
With your background I guess you can figure out who walks beside me.
The old footprints in the sand story.
I am never alone
 

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With your background I guess you can figure out who walks beside me.
The old footprints in the sand story.
I am never alone
Hoofprints . . .cowboy.
 
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