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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Enhanced Pancake style..came today..owb..really like the detail and the way the Glock-26 rides on the hip....

a3lobo.jpg a2lobo.jpg a1lobo.jpg

:hand10::hand10:
 

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Very nice! I plan to order a holster from them soon for my 3" 686+.
From your picture the quality looks top notch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very nice! I plan to order a holster from them soon for my 3" 686+.
From your picture the quality looks top notch.
The quality is excellent, but what I like about this style is the way my 26 rides on the hip..I have a full right hand shooting grip on extraction. All 4 fingers can completely grab the handle of the weapon with no problems at all.

010lobo.jpg
 

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I have two of these for a 686 and a 627; amazing how stable and tight to the body these are. The most difficult part of the break-in was threading the belt; but, after the leather conformed to my shape, they're a breeze to put on and remove. Great value and excellent workmanship.
 

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I have bought their leather goods before. Great quality and great to do business with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have two of these for a 686 and a 627; amazing how stable and tight to the body these are. The most difficult part of the break-in was threading the belt; but, after the leather conformed to my shape, they're a breeze to put on and remove. Great value and excellent workmanship.
And I thought it was just me....:rofl:
 

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V good. Your holster uses the slot system developed first by Hume to overcome Baker's 3-slot patent, which required that at least two of the slots be surrounded by a stitchline (as I recall, because, geez it's been a long time since Roy's patent was being studied by the industry).

When pancakes became mainstream in the 70s, the big-mag autos were not (mainstream) -- and shorties didn't exist at all. It was pretty much Commanders and Governments, and a handful of Smith 59s, and an occasional Hi Power; the latter less common because they were "only" in 9mm. Why would I mention this? Because virtually all autopistols then had a long barrel and that long barrel helped hold the rig upright if the holster carried high on the belt. And quite frankly, we focused on a very large revolver market, where all we had to do was place the cylinder at the waist regardless of barrel length. Here's what a 70s Bianchi for a big auto looked like then (this image from the 80s):

bianchi 88.jpeg

Note the green horizontal line, which references the top of the belt: the line is fully above the ejector port. Even then the barrel is long, the leather double-thickness at the slots.

Now note the same line, this time on your holster:

lobo (1).jpg

Even being generous with the elevation of the line, the line cuts through the ejection port -- and the pistol is short. And the slotted area is single thickness leather.

Now we're well out of the late 20th century, and so my personal approach ignores barrel length and focuses on balance (weight distribution above and below the belt):

nichols.jpg

Note the ejection port is now well below the top of the belt. Again, who cares? Because you're going to get some posts that say you now need a "real" gunbelt because (in your pic) your pistol's grip is sagging away from your torso; when in fact it's the high ride of your holster with a very short, big-mag auto that's causing the drooping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
V good. Your holster uses the slot system developed first by Hume to overcome Baker's 3-slot patent, which required that at least two of the slots be surrounded by a stitchline (as I recall, because, geez it's been a long time since Roy's patent was being studied by the industry).

When pancakes became mainstream in the 70s, the big-mag autos were not (mainstream) -- and shorties didn't exist at all. It was pretty much Commanders and Governments, and a handful of Smith 59s, and an occasional Hi Power; the latter less common because they were "only" in 9mm. Why would I mention this? Because virtually all autopistols then had a long barrel and that long barrel helped hold the rig upright if the holster carried high on the belt. And quite frankly, we focused on a very large revolver market, where all we had to do was place the cylinder at the waist regardless of barrel length. Here's what a 70s Bianchi for a big auto looked like then (this image from the 80s):

View attachment 75514

Note the green horizontal line, which references the top of the belt: the line is fully above the ejector port. Even then the barrel is long, the leather double-thickness at the slots.

Now note the same line, this time on your holster:

View attachment 75515

Even being generous with the elevation of the line, the line cuts through the ejection port -- and the pistol is short. And the slotted area is single thickness leather.

Now we're well out of the late 20th century, and so my personal approach ignores barrel length and focuses on balance (weight distribution above and below the belt):

View attachment 75516

Note the ejection port is now well below the top of the belt. Again, who cares? Because you're going to get some posts that say you now need a "real" gunbelt because (in your pic) your pistol's grip is sagging away from your torso; when in fact it's the high ride of your holster with a very short, big-mag auto that's causing the drooping.
I was doing really good and enjoying the history of holster making until I got to the drooping part...then you lost me...I had a friend take that picture and I was sorta leaning to the left so she could get a clear view...I have no "drooping"...so here are two more pic's of me not leaning over to the left..And this is a "gun belt" ...and no snide remarks about the spare Mitchelin...:image035:

aaaaalobo.jpg aaaaalobo1.jpg
 

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Nope, looks good in the new pics. The info helps us understand 'why' things work; in this case partly because the gunbelt is contributing its stiffness when cinched up tight. I know it sounds like I'm just being bitchy, but in design we have to reject something that works for the "wrong" reason; in this case, if you had a two-dollar belt on and cinched it normally and your holster STILL carried that way, the holster would be working for the "right" reason. Right/wrong is about predictability: can the designer be absolutely sure the wearer will get the result the designer intended.

Michael and I are going 'round-n-'round about this right now; my Chain Lightning belt is considered 'thin' by gunbelt standards, and so Michael feels it doesn't meet the expectations of the market. And of course he's not wrong about that. But Chain Lightning works because of its unique shape and because the holsters (in this case mine :0 ) are expected to do all the work themselves. When the holster does that, the belt returns to being a mounting point, rather than a 'stressed member', and goes back to holding up your pants.
 

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Everything in holster design involves compromises among the four basic factors of comfort, accessibility, security, and concealability. Whenever one factor is emphasized there will be compromises among the other factors. There is no such thing as the "perfect holster" for every user or circumstances, period.

Interesting discussion with some very good information offered. I would offer just one bit of additional information.

The Lobo Gun Leather "Enhanced Pancake Model" differs in a significant way from earlier pancake designs and that is the use of welted seam construction, the welts being a third layer of leather between the inner and outer holster panels in the fore-and-aft "wings" which form the belt attachment points. The welts add significantly to the strength and rigidity of the finished holster, essentially adding 50% more leather at the load-bearing and weight-carrying portions of the holster, which tends to hold the holster firmly in the upright position against the body. The tunnel-style loops allow for a smooth outer shell over which the cover garment can move easily without snagging or printing because there are no exposed lumps as there would be with a traditional two-panel pancake design. There are other "enhancements" as well, but beyond the scope of this discussion.

Arguments about the relative merits of belt slots or tunnel loops are valid considerations. I will say that my daily carry holster (Kimber Custom CDP) is the Enhanced Pancake Model, one of the original prototype holsters made for testing this design, it has been in use for four years, and it remains the most comfortable and concealable holster I have ever used.

Since introducing the Enhanced Pancake Model on January 1, 2010 it has become the most popular of my 11 holster designs, accounting for over 40% of all orders. This model has also been adopted as standard issue by a European nation's national investigative service (contract provisions do not permit naming the agency for advertising purposes).

As the designer of the Enhanced Pancake Model, and as the maker of the holster shown in this post, I will take responsibility for every shortcoming inherent in the design. I will also take credit for what is, in my opinion, probably the most significant improvement in pancake-style holsters since their introduction by Mr. Roy Baker nearly 50 years ago.

Best regards.
 

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Red, if you and Michael want to field test the Chain Lightning belt under actual end user conditions, I can volunteer my services using my full size Government model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Everything in holster design involves compromises among the four basic factors of comfort, accessibility, security, and concealability. Whenever one factor is emphasized there will be compromises among the other factors. There is no such thing as the "perfect holster" for every user or circumstances, period.

Interesting discussion with some very good information offered. I would offer just one bit of additional information.

The Lobo Gun Leather "Enhanced Pancake Model" differs in a significant way from earlier pancake designs and that is the use of welted seam construction, the welts being a third layer of leather between the inner and outer holster panels in the fore-and-aft "wings" which form the belt attachment points. The welts add significantly to the strength and rigidity of the finished holster, essentially adding 50% more leather at the load-bearing and weight-carrying portions of the holster, which tends to hold the holster firmly in the upright position against the body. The tunnel-style loops allow for a smooth outer shell over which the cover garment can move easily without snagging or printing because there are no exposed lumps as there would be with a traditional two-panel pancake design. There are other "enhancements" as well, but beyond the scope of this discussion.

Arguments about the relative merits of belt slots or tunnel loops are valid considerations. I will say that my daily carry holster (Kimber Custom CDP) is the Enhanced Pancake Model, one of the original prototype holsters made for testing this design, it has been in use for four years, and it remains the most comfortable and concealable holster I have ever used.

Since introducing the Enhanced Pancake Model on January 1, 2010 it has become the most popular of my 11 holster designs, accounting for over 40% of all orders. This model has also been adopted as standard issue by a European nation's national investigative service (contract provisions do not permit naming the agency for advertising purposes).

As the designer of the Enhanced Pancake Model, and as the maker of the holster shown in this post, I will take responsibility for every shortcoming inherent in the design. I will also take credit for what is, in my opinion, probably the most significant improvement in pancake-style holsters since their introduction by Mr. Roy Baker nearly 50 years ago.

Best regards.
Ray....as I stated...great holster design, comfortable and accessible..really love it..thanks again......can't say enough......
 
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