Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm going to be doing my first cleaning after a range day coming up and want to get down and dirty with my glock 19.

Im still however confused as to which way to clean it... I see some people use CLP or Ballistol which from what i gather cleans and lubricates at the same time, while others use Hoppe's 9 Solvent to clean then lubricate with a gun oil...

What do I need to do guys?
 
  • Like
Reactions: CG11

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,972 Posts
For any new firearm, I clean and lube before I ever fire it.
I keep it simple, Hoppes 9 solvent, gun oil and gun grease. Get a simple cleaning kit.
Remember, a little dab a do ya.
Google for videos on gun cleaning for your pistol.
Quite often the firearm manufacturer has videos or pdfs available.
https://us.glock.com/documents/gun_maintenance.pdf

Once you get the hang of it, you may decide to try another brand or type. CLP, Frog lube, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #3

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,459 Posts
Ive read through that and have watched several videos but each time the process varies, so i was a little unsure and to which to follow...

I thought this one looked ok and then just grab whatever toothbrush pack is on sale, and some hoppes 9

https://www.amazon.com/UTG-9MM-Pist...d=1488282934&sr=1-3&keywords=9mm+cleaning+kit
The kit looks OK. I use a gun brush to better get into the crevices.
https://www.amazon.com/SE-7624BC-5-Cleaning-Brushes-Double-Ended/dp/B009HD0R86/ref=sr_1_1?s=hunting-fishing&ie=UTF8&qid=1488283383&sr=1-1

I also use a jag.

https://www.adorama.com/kbjag229.html
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
Use whatever you want honestly. For the most part, oils and cleaners are simply a preference. For me, I grew up with the smell of Hoppes in the air and have returned to it. CLP for me personally just isn't as good of a cleaner as I prefer. I used it for quite some time. Probably the best cleaning tool you'll find yourself not wanting to do without is a polymer cleaning pick. It is invaluable for getting a cleaning patch inside the rails and all the other nooks and crannies. You can do it with a q-tip as well, but q-tips have a tendency to shed, especially when wet. You don't need more gunk getting on the pistol when you're trying to clean out gunk that is already there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
500 Posts
A CLP will work fine, especially for a Glock which doesn't need a lot of special care or lubrication to run. I use a CLP product almost all of the time but I still have Hoppes around for when I pick up a used gun that needs a good cleaning or need to clean up a revolver that I've been shooting a lot of lead reloads out of. Solvent will clean better for sure. With the CLP products like Breakfree and Ballistol, you'll may need to let it sit for a little longer than solvent in the bore, but it'll get it clean enough, especially if you're shooting jacketed bullets. For any of my all-metal guns that have full-length rails, I use an additional lubricant on the slide rails, but the CLP is enough for the rest of the gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Heading over to walmart today to see what i find...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Im watching ANOTHER... video....

Does CLP or Ballistol act as a lubricant as well or is gun oil still required for rails and such....?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,806 Posts
My preference for a powder solvent is Shooter's Choice. As for lubing your Glock 19, keep it simple and keep it sparse. Since you plan to carry your Glock, I would suggest that you not use any oil or grease but rather a high quality dry lube. This will significantly reduce the amount of dirt, dust, lint, and other debris that would otherwise be attracted to the common gun lubricants. I use Hornady's One Shot dry lube, which is rated very high. It's the perfect product for polymer handguns and even some rifles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I had it cleaned and lubed the the gunsmith at the range and I already saw what you mean by buildup and whatnot as I'm positive he was generous with the lube... i can see debris built up everywhere lube went from one shooting session...

thats why i want to learn how to do this my own way, and the right way...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,569 Posts
Im watching ANOTHER... video....

Does CLP or Ballistol act as a lubricant as well or is gun oil still required for rails and such....?
Both act as both a cleaner and an oil. There's no need to watch a bunch of videos, just grab something and "get r done". Trust me, after a few cleanings you're going to know what works better than others. Nothing you buy that is dedicated to gun cleaning or already a well known cleaner is going to hurt the gun. I don't suggest you go looking in the automotive department for oils and grease, no matter how many "old timers" tell you they've done it for 40 years. And believe me, I've heard hundreds of times about it from people in my own family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
Remember this: Watch New Shimmer From Saturday Night Live - NBC.com?

My take on the subject is that cleaning and lubrication are two separate jobs with pretty different requirements. Cleaning requires that foreign contaminants be broken down and flushed away, ideally leaving as little of the cleaning agent behind as possible. Lubrication requires that a foreign contaminant be deliberately introduced to reduce friction between mating surfaces and to protect against surface corrosion, and that it should remain in place as long as possible. To me, a product that tries to do both, is going to do neither to full efficiency.

My preference is for a dedicated solvent: Hoppes #9 or Hoppes Elite (a little less pungent) and a dedicated lubricant: Militec, FP10 or - as I've been using lately - Mobile1.

If CLP leaves your gun tasting great and looking shiny, and you're not having any reliability issues, carry on and disregard my rantings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
This is what confuses me... the ballistol or clp is used to clean but then must be dried or evaporated completely before reassembly... so am i overthinking it? is it still lubing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,452 Posts
I use hoppes 9 as a cleaner, and the clp as an oil/lubricant. A light coating of clp seems to stay put on a gun that might sit a while.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kukla

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
694 Posts
I started out with Hoppes solvent and oil, but since I switched to Break-Free CLP, cleaning my guns is a much easier job. If I was the kind of person who only cleaned them when they start malfunctioning, I'd go back to solvent and oil, but I clean 'em every time I shoot 'em.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I started out with Hoppes solvent and oil, but since I switched to Break-Free CLP, cleaning my guns is a much easier job. If I was the kind of person who only cleaned them when they start malfunctioning, I'd go back to solvent and oil, but I clean 'em every time I shoot 'em.
So as you use the CLP on the barrel and slide to clean, once you wipe it dry it also keeps it lubricated? you don't add additional lube?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,459 Posts
This is what confuses me... the ballistol or clp is used to clean but then must be dried or evaporated completely before reassembly... so am i overthinking it? is it still lubing?
Some people don't like the smell of Ballistol! For cleaning my black powder guns, nothing works better. CLP and Ballistol will leave a film on your metal parts. For lubing, I prefer M-Pro 7, which can be found at most Wally Worlds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,600 Posts
For Glocks, which need very little lubrication, I'd say CLP is fine. It will clean and carry away carbon. Wipe dry and it has penetrated where it needs to be. No CLP in the striker channel. Another application for CLP is guns that get dirty and run wet. Apply CLP as you shoot. The carbon will build up in the CLP as it cleans, and be carried away by the CLP as the gun cycles. I'm specifically thinking about belt fed guns. I've also doused M16's with CLP, especially with blank firing adapters. Typically, a CLP bath is overkill for an AR.

Dry lube- maybe good for your striker channel? My striker channel has no lube and hasn't had any trouble. Otherwise, only useful for extreme environments where oil is more likely to cause a failure than to keep things running. And don't use it on my gun because it is steel sliding on hard particles. There is zero rebound, which is what I'm looking for in a lubricant for metal parts sliding under pressure.

KISS. Hoppes is a good solvent. $12 for a couple ounces of the latest gun label tacti-wiz doesn't make it better. Put limited amounts of synthetic oil that will penetrate into the twisty/springy parts. I've come to prefer 0 weight grease in the slidey parts. But a small amount of oil wiped down will work too.

In a Glock, I see oiling and wiping clean the internals more for protection than for lubrication. It shouldn't look bone dry (it will still shoot bone dry), but shouldn't be oily to the touch.
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top