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Useful or a waste of money.

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So in defensive situations, you beleive all sights are basically useless no matter what configuration they come in? That's basically what I hear some saying.
Some hear what they selectively choose to hear.
 
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9:25 PM low light
View attachment 360299

Later in the evening, no light but using Fenix E12 pocket light.
View attachment 360300
Have it you own way, but I would not consider the first photo "low light" in terms of what we did in my low light class. That is lit well enough to not even require a flashlight.

In the second photo, sure, I can see the sight, the gun and your big, white hand, because you have the flashlight pointing the gun. But what good does that do? You could not use the direction of that flashlight beam to ID the target. The idea is to illuminate the target with the flashlight and have the sights illuminate themselves.
 

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In the second photo, sure, I can see the sight, the gun and your big, white hand, because you have the flashlight pointing the gun. But what good does that do? You could not use the direction of that flashlight beam to ID the target. The idea is to illuminate the target with the flashlight and have the sights illuminate themselves.
When I'm running my handgun and hand-held light in tandem, the light is beneath the gun, not behind it. Different strokes.
 

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Have it you own way, but I would not consider the first photo "low light" in terms of what we did in my low light class. That is lit well enough to not even require a flashlight.

In the second photo, sure, I can see the sight, the gun and your big, white hand, because you have the flashlight pointing the gun. But what good does that do? You could not use the direction of that flashlight beam to ID the target. The idea is to illuminate the target with the flashlight and have the sights illuminate themselves.
That is not true at all. The camera does not pick up what the eye sees. The camera naturally focused on the thing that stood out the most, but I could clearly see what was beyond the limits of the cameras focus.
 

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When I'm running my handgun and hand-held light in tandem, the light is beneath the gun, not behind it. Different strokes.
I hold my light out to the far side of my body, so if someone shoots toward the light, it will hopefully go far to one side or the other towards the light instead of me being behind it.
 

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Someone mentioned that the majority of us that find night sights unnecessary do not carry a gun conducive to them, like a 38 Special snub. In this picture, I have a snub with night sights and a snub with orange fingernail polish on the stock black ramp. I carry the one with the orange fingernail polish on the stock black ramp.

Around 7 years ago, I thought I would like a night sight on it, so I installed a standard size XS Big Dot. I didn't care for it, so I took it off and put the black ramp back on. I guess I'm not in the majority this time.
 

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That is not true at all. The camera does not pick up what the eye sees. The camera naturally focused on the thing that stood out the most, but I could clearly see what was beyond the limits of the cameras focus.
My mistake. I thought you were posting the pictures to show us what the eye sees. I guess I don't see the purpose of the photos then.
 

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I hold my light out to the far side of my body, so if someone shoots toward the light, it will hopefully go far to one side or the other towards the light instead of me being behind it.
Then how do you see the sights?
 

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My mistake. I thought you were posting the pictures to show us what the eye sees. I guess I don't see the purpose of the photos then.
What the eye sees and what the camera captures are very different in some instances.
The purpose of the photo is just to show how residual light from the flashlight can illuminate the front sight
 

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I hold my light out to the far side of my body, so if someone shoots toward the light, it will hopefully go far to one side or the other towards the light instead of me being behind it.
Part of my training and subsequent practice involves leaving the light on only long enough to acquire the target and take the shot. In low light, the target is suffering the same limitations that I am. Additionally, my lumens in their eyes places them at an even greater disadvantage.
 

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Part of my training and subsequent practice involves leaving the light on only long enough to acquire the target and take the shot. In low light, the target is suffering the same limitations that I am. Additionally, my lumens in their eyes places them at an even greater disadvantage.
The reality is that a lot of this training is done from the wrong perspective. What I mean by that, is, running around with a torch and gun looking for something that goes bump in the night is a fools endeavor.
Secondly, thinking that your lumens is going to blind them is assuming that either they won’t see you and hold off on the shot, or, they do not know how to preserve their night vision after being “ lit”.
 

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The reality is that a lot of this training is done from the wrong perspective. What I mean by that, is, running around with a torch and gun looking for something that goes bump in the night is a fools endeavor.
Secondly, thinking that your lumens is going to blind them is assuming that either they won’t see you and hold off on the shot, or, they do not know how to preserve their night vision after being “ lit”.
My training was to literally "flash" the light, a quick on-off and then immediately move. The only time the light stays on is when you are throwing rounds and then only as long as necessary. We were not taught to worry about trying to blind an opponent. Too iffy. Also, there may be more than one.

At one point in the training, we couldn't use the flashlights anymore and it was really total darkness. The RSO had to wear NVGs, only one person hot at a time and the instructor had a hand on the shooter's shoulder. You were literally using your muzzle flash from one shot to illuminate the next. We even did that on moving targets. They were not recommending this approach, BTW, they just wanted us to experience it. It can work, though, surprisingly well.
 

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I hold my light out to the far side of my body, so if someone shoots toward the light, it will hopefully go far to one side or the other towards the light instead of me being behind it.
I find something about shoulder level height and lay my flashlight on it, pointed at the BG. Then I sneak up from behind him and suprise him. Works everytime.


Lol....Just kidding..... ,I hold the light out to my side also.
 

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Not identifying your target in the dark and, not seeing your target in the dark are two different things!
A “bump in the night” is just that, the sound of a bump whose source is unidentified. Hopefully, nobody on this forum is the sort to start pulling the trigger on a non-threatening noise.
However, if the sound is that of a person yelling at me…”I’m gonna ____kill you, you __ __! Well then, that has just become a lethal threat even though I can’t “see” it.
The term “I’m gonna light you up” comes to mind. I will fire at his voice and my muzzle flash should give me a quick determination on his position. Yep, I know, muzzle flash. But, I am quite certain the threat will receive a far worse dose of it than I will.
I will not fire on something I cannot identify as friend or foe. Not seeing a known threat will not keep me from firing on it. Whether the cause is darkness, a bush or, a cardboard box, if it becomes a known threat in my field of fire, he better be hiding behind a car engine! Hopefully, it’ll be just his luck to drop down behind either the front end of a ‘68 Volkswagen Bug or, the front of an old Chevy Vega!!😂
 

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I've shot at night before, my carry guns have night sights.

I speculate majority of those that think night sights unnecessary likely carry a gun not conducive to night sights anyway (LCP 380/38 snub) - there be exceptions, but generalization probably aint wrong.
The new Ruger LCP Max comes with excellent night sights with a white ring in front, from the factory.

The Ruger LCR snubs have easily changed sights.
 
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My training was to literally "flash" the light, a quick on-off and then immediately move. The only time the light stays on is when you are throwing rounds and then only as long as necessary. We were not taught to worry about trying to blind an opponent. Too iffy. Also, there may be more than one.

At one point in the training, we couldn't use the flashlights anymore and it was really total darkness. The RSO had to wear NVGs, only one person hot at a time and the instructor had a hand on the shooter's shoulder. You were literally using your muzzle flash from one shot to illuminate the next. We even did that on moving targets. They were not recommending this approach, BTW, they just wanted us to experience it. It can work, though, surprisingly well.
I’m sorry, but I think that is BS feel good training, not training to survive.
If you were training to survive, they would have you place you butt in the corner of a wall and wait for the BG to come to you.
Running lights and searching work fine as a team operation, but not as an individual endeavor.

Yes, using your muzzle flash to illuminate is an old technique called Flash-Fire. But where are those rounds going while you are shooting to illuminate the target?

Bad ju-ju.
 

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i've got night sights, but they're not a big deal to me. i don't shoot at night, and i can't have a gun in the bedroom. pretty much negates almost any reason i would have for 'em
 

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The reality is that a lot of this training is done from the wrong perspective. What I mean by that, is, running around with a torch and gun looking for something that goes bump in the night is a fools endeavor.
Secondly, thinking that your lumens is going to blind them is assuming that either they won’t see you and hold off on the shot, or, they do not know how to preserve their night vision after being “ lit”.
Yes, indeed. I've done it in training, but not in application.

Honestly, I've probably discarded or at least tweaked more methods taught to me in training than I've adopted as is as my own. Training generally gives me a starting point from which to work out my own approach. My carry methods, draw stroke, aiming technique, and flashlight handling are all uniquely my own, developed from methods taught to me by others.
 

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Yes, indeed. I've done it in training, but not in application.

Honestly, I've probably discarded or at least tweaked more methods taught to me in training than I've adopted as is as my own. Training generally gives me a starting point from which to work out my own approach. My carry methods, draw stroke, aiming technique, and flashlight handling are all uniquely my own, developed from methods taught to me by others.
I figured out the dangers real quick in 1989 when my company lost a Marine that went in alone…
 
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