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I thought I would post this here because it has a big impact on laws enforced against gun owners and Homeland Security actions against gun owners.

Per the article below, a federal court ruled yesterday that there is no 4A expectation of privacy on your home computer. The decision arose out of a child porn case, so it's a case of good intentions having unintended consequences. The FBI took over the servers of a porn distributor and that server planted malware on all the visitor's computers that allowed the FBI to find child porn on individuals' computers. Personally, I think it's not only a 4A violation, but entrapment.

Here's what could happen now. If law enforcement is looking for illegal gun information, and who knows what will become illegal in the next few years, they could hack sites and individual computers to get leads and justifications for physical search warrants.

I am going to be more careful of what I say online, keep gun information off my computer (I'm going to put all my gun records on a thumb drive) and have the best security software I can get. I use BitDefender's Total Security, but there are other good ones. I also keep all my passwords in Password Safe, which is free to individual users. A computer security expert I know told me it is the best one out there.

Federal Court: The Fourth Amendment Does Not Protect Your Home Computer » Alex Jones' Infowars: There's a war on for your mind!
 

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infowars? seriously?
 

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From an IDG News Service article. Morgan is the Federal judge who issued the ruling:

...users “cannot reasonably expect” to be safe from hackers, he added. The FBI also didn’t violate the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution by hacking into the suspect’s computer. Law enforcement should be able to use cutting-edge technology to stop crimes done in secrecy, Morgan said.
Chilling. This is yet another in a quickly growing list of examples of why we must win in November. The 9th seat on the SCOTUS MUST be occupied by a true American. This is even more important than winning the White House.
 

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So, we don't have to just fight the bad guys. This proves we have to fight the FBI etc too. How sad.
Or how sad that yes, I reasonably expect, to be safe from hackers, bad guys, gov invasion, foreign invasion... I'm glad I'm old. I don't have to live with this crap as long as the young ones do.
 

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So, we don't have to just fight the bad guys. This proves we have to fight the FBI etc too. How sad.
Or how sad that yes, I reasonably expect, to be safe from hackers, bad guys, gov invasion, foreign invasion... I'm glad I'm old. I don't have to live with this crap as long as the young ones do.

Fighting the Feds requires very deep pockets.
 

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Why fight them?

Switch to a secure operating system like Tails, and a secure browser such as Tor. Tails can be ran live from a DVD and Tor is included. If you really want security, you can buy a modded Lenovo T60 or T61 that has the BIOS reflashed to a secure BIOS and all back doors are closed.

If they hack your BIOS, they're in no matter what else you've done to the system or what software you are running.

Edward Snowden had this very same T60 system that had the information he provided to the press about NSA intrusions and spying.
 

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Why fight them?

Switch to a secure operating system like Tails, and a secure browser such as Tor. Tails can be ran live from a DVD and Tor is included. If you really want security, you can buy a modded Lenovo T60 or T61 that has the BIOS reflashed to a secure BIOS and all back doors are closed.

If they hack your BIOS, they're in no matter what else you've done to the system or what software you are running.

Edward Snowden had this very same T60 system that had the information he provided to the press about NSA intrusions and spying.
Playpen (defendant) was using Tor.
 

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Right now, it's actually 'too many'. But this might not be a factor in the future.

In fact, people could have bad stuff planted on their computers by political frenemies and then be put in the oubliette(*).

(*)(means 'to forget' in French).
 

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Playpen (defendant) was using Tor.
You still have to use some common sense when using the Tor browser. Especially if you are not using any other safeguards. Tor is not a magic wand that will suddenly keep all of your browsing and computer activity a secret. I don't know who Playpen is.
 

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Playpen (defendant) was using Tor.
Correct. The "trick" here was that the malware would read the IP address of the user's machine and phone it home.

From a technical and legal standpoint, I have issues with this. An IP address is NOT proof of identity. Consider the following possibilities:
1) your neighbor or their children come over and either bring a computer with them and use your WiFi or use your computer
2) Your WiFi is compromised and someone uses it for nefarious purposes
3) You opt to have a "guest" WiFi which provides you with plausible deniability regarding any traffic from your access point
4) You believe in the privacy and anonymity of Tor and run a Tor exit node.
 

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Never put any info on your computer that you don't want anyone else to have. I have seen to many companies hacked. Watch the web sites you go into. Use as much security as possible on computer and wifi or internet connection. I'm not a computer guy, but seeing what my company has put in place these are just the things I follow.
 

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You still have to use some common sense when using the Tor browser. Especially if you are not using any other safeguards. Tor is not a magic wand that will suddenly keep all of your browsing and computer activity a secret. I don't know who Playpen is.
Yes, and that gets to the heart of the ruling. The FBI wasn't able to obtain IP addresses on the Thor network until they employed NIT.

With this ruling, the fear is no matter what safe guards you use to protect your ID (such as the ones you said), the Feds can use whatever techniques they want to get info w/out a warrant.

I think the abuse potential is very scary.
 

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With this ruling, the fear is no matter what safe guards you use to protect your ID (such as the ones you said), the Feds can use whatever techniques they want to get info w/out a warrant.

I think the abuse potential is very scary.
It's right up there with the idea of blanket warrants issued not only in secret but in other jurisdictions claiming that because of the Internet you can be anywhere so there should be no boundaries on warrants.

This nonsense is getting more and more out of hand even following the Snowden releases. At some point we're going to reach a breaking point and either put a stop to it or openly descend into a police state. Our "rulers" want the latter.
 

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You still have to use some common sense when using the Tor browser. Especially if you are not using any other safeguards. Tor is not a magic wand that will suddenly keep all of your browsing and computer activity a secret. I don't know who Playpen is.
Anyone looking up child porn is probably lacking common sense.

Yes, and that gets to the heart of the ruling. The FBI wasn't able to obtain IP addresses on the Thor network until they employed NIT.

With this ruling, the fear is no matter what safe guards you use to protect your ID (such as the ones you said), the Feds can use whatever techniques they want to get info w/out a warrant.

I think the abuse potential is very scary.
Based on how they obtained information, I dont really see how what they did was illegal. The FBI was alerted to a child porn site, then the FBI took over that website, then they watched to see who accessed that website.
 

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Anyone looking up child porn is probably lacking common sense.



Based on how they obtained information, I dont really see how what they did was illegal. The FBI was alerted to a child porn site, then the FBI took over that website, then they watched to see who accessed that website.
It's not what they did in the particular instance. It's the precedent that could be set that is scary.
 

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It's not what they did in the particular instance. It's the precedent that could be set that is scary.
What precedent is that? Nothing I read indicates that a precedent was set here.
 
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