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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got my Concealed Handgun Permit about two weeks ago, and have been making a concerted effort to carry whenever I leave the house and know I'm not going anywhere that is prohibited (there are lots of them in my life). I carried at work most of last week, but today I had to go somewhere prohibited (local military base, so couldn't even lock it in the car) so I left my weapon at home. It got me to thinking what the company rules are, and that I probably should have checked. I work for a Fortune 500 company, but have a small office in an building with a few other businesses in it, to include a medical research clinic and a tax preparation business. I'm the only one in the office as our other employees are at a customer's facility. Needless to say, between the tax office and the folks getting $100 a pop for doing medical tests, there are some shady characters walking up and down the hall. I normally leave my door closed but unlocked since the restroom is down the hall, and my buddy in another office comes by for coffee in the morning. A few times I've had people walk right in on me to ask directions. I've thought about locking the door, but I am a social animal and don't like the isolation.

I called my company security officer to ask her about carrying weapons on company property with a ccw. She told me that all firearms were a "restricted item" on company property, right up there with illegal drugs. I asked if there was any allowance for a state issued permit and she said probably not, but would check. She also said that any waiver would have to come from somewhere higher than her, but she would ask the question for me.

I'm still debating whether or not to push the issue of a waiver to policy. I don't see any career repercussions, but don't know if it's worth the inevitable PIA it will entail. That said, now that I CAN carry, I don't like the feeling of being in an office essentially open to the public with out some means of protection.

Thoughts?
 

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If its legal than I do not see a problem with it. Just make sure all is well and apparently you know where you are not suppose to carry.

*Edit* This may be my own feeling, but I personally feel that no one else should know im carrying but my immediate other/family. I do not know how other coworkers or friends will act if in the unlikely event something bad happens, the last thing I want is someone yelling "he has a gun, protect us".
 

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I'm still debating whether or not to push the issue of a waiver to policy. I don't see any career repercussions, but don't know if it's worth the inevitable PIA it will entail. That said, now that I CAN carry, I don't like the feeling of being in an office essentially open to the public with out some means of protection.
You might not.

But realize others might, others that have control over your career at that company. And if the "wrong" person is anti-gunner enough, offended enough at the thought someone inside the company believes citizens should be armed, it might well go badly. Say goodbye to any firm recommendation from the company, then, if sacked for such a "threatening" position. (Depends on the company, and how much of a "higher-up" such a person is who'd trash your employment there.) Just beware of the simple realities, if the wrong person feels crossed by your "defection" to the other side. It's a very real issue, in some companies. It happens every day.

Keep in mind, too, you've now let the cat out of the bag. You're known to carry ... by both Security as well as whomever those folks are going to speak with ... and whomever those folks will speak with. And it's all too likely your name's going to come up in those discussions. Keep your wits about you. Watch your "six."

Congratulations on the new CHL, by the way. :eek:k:
 

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Concealed means concealed. That's not an option now. You gave them notice and are on "warning" not to carry. It's a choice you have to make, is being made worth your job?

I don't carry at work as its not practical, plus the layout of my workplace provides better opportunity to evade rather than engage a threat. That being said I have access to a restricted workroom just feet from my office that only I have the code to. My CCW is placed in my lunch bag and locked there when I get to work. I don't want to be without it durring my commute but don't feel comfortable "locking" it up in the car.

I'm sure if you think about it there is some compromise you can find that will allow you to be comfortable and safe. Bottom line, I could never be comfortable if I was always worried about loseing my job because I printed or exposed. You have to find the ballance in your situation.

Edit: congrats on obtaining your CCW but the best thing you can do is keep it concealed. At work with people that may now be watching you, make no mention of guns. If anything you got rid of your guns and dont carry as one of your friends had an "incident" with his gun. People that have power over you at work won't see the light of your right to self protection. While amoungst sheep sometimes it's best to blend in for self preservation.

Secuirity at work: keep your door LOCKED!!! If you can't even keep pepper spray at work keep a cane or other "decorations" that could be used as weapons. The best weapon you have is on your shoulders. It's good to look like the sheep, just don't think or act like them.
 

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Glad I live in Mississippi. Our enhanced carry law means we can carry anywhere, even if a sign is posted saying we can't, we can just ignore it with the enhanced carry permit.

Sent from my LT30at using Tapatalk 4 Beta
 

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Glad I live in Mississippi. Our enhanced carry law means we can carry anywhere, even if a sign is posted saying we can't, we can just ignore it with the enhanced carry permit.

Sent from my LT30at using Tapatalk 4 Beta
Same in California. If asked to leave private property you best be getting on though. Any employer could fire you for much less than carrying at work as well. We have a right to carry and property/business owners have a right to expect a weapons free environment.
 

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I would recommend finding a more accommodating employer, you are not their property, you are someone who helps them make money.
 

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As I see it, your biggest mistake was calling company security and asking the question. 99.9% of the time your going to get a negative response on it. You should have requested a employee handbook and looked it up. If it didn't say no guns, your good to go without their approval.
 

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As I see it, your biggest mistake was calling company security and asking the question. 99.9% of the time your going to get a negative response on it. You should have requested a employee handbook and looked it up. If it didn't say no guns, your good to go without their approval.
+ 1
 

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As I see it, your biggest mistake was calling company security and asking the question. 99.9% of the time your going to get a negative response on it. You should have requested a employee handbook and looked it up. If it didn't say no guns, your good to go without their approval.
I certainly agree with that. You've put the authorities on notice that there's a possibility that you might carry a firearm. Even if it's legal for you to carry you still might be risking your continued employment. Usually in cases where the rules aren't specifically spelled out if you have to ask the answer is invariably "no".

I suggest deep concealment & not telling a soul that you're armed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Calling security wasn't an issue. I needed to clarify what the policy is and she was the best one to talk to. I'm not going to put my job at risk because I don't know what the rules are. She was very clear, no weapons are allowed in company facilities. I'm glad I checked with that. I'm senior enough in the company that asking the question won't have any repercussions.
 

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I am part owner of my company . And i do not open carry when on company property while any of my employees are present. We have a couple very liberal employees and i do not want to upset the balance.
 

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To me the real question is - do you really want to shoot someone at work? Go over the scenarios. Do you have money or other valuables in the office? Is there a likelihood that someone in the office will go postal, that some of the shady characters will grab a hostage? That a disgruntled spouse will do something and then start killing witnesses?

If none of the above, I'd suggest a couple non-lethal tools. 300 lumen tac light in your pocket and in your desk drawer. Pepper spray. Cell phone on speed dial to base security. Ask your office or building manager if you can do a 'once per quarter response drill' where you call base security and time their response. I would also suggest you lock the door when you leave your office to go anywhere so no one can hide in your office and surprise you. The other danger point would be walking to your car after dark. Keep you hand on your spray and flashlight until in your car. Lock the doors. Good luck!

Those, to me, are better ideas than carrying and hoping to 'get a pass' if you shoot some shady character who suddenly scares you.
 

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Your company "should" have a clear cut policy on firearms and anything else prohibited. That would have been the place to check, not with the security officer. Lack of a policy is "no" policy. But now you've let the cat out of the bag.

Evaluate the actual risks/need for SD at your workplace, the opportunity for employment elsewhere (and if "elsewhere" allows CC) and make your decisions based on that.
 
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Good replies. My point, which I want to emphasize here is that having a firearm is NOT the solution to everything. And you must do a vulnerability and reaction analysis of a situation. Among the top priorities is how can you gain time, distance and cover. For example you can buy a briefcase with a bullet-resistant lining. If you had that at your desk it would give you some cover and some time if a shady character popped in with a firearm. If you were really in a dangerous area you could ask security to install metal detectors. What is the history of violence at your workplace, for example. Are there signs posted out front (actually those are worse for the occupants than any BGs, declaring you're ripe for the picking).

Are you in a first floor office? Can you escape out a window. If you have to lock your door, is it a substantial barrier? Maybe you could ask for a better door, given that you can't arm yourself?

These are among the options you should be investigating. If it's really not a dangerous area, then ask if you're really just bemoaning being limited more than needing a firearm.

In the absence of any mitigating factors, if you were really in a dangerous area, then you'd lock your door at the least, and change jobs at the most.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Your company "should" have a clear cut policy on firearms and anything else prohibited. That would have been the place to check, not with the security officer. Lack of a policy is "no" policy. But now you've let the cat out of the bag.

Evaluate the actual risks/need for SD at your workplace, the opportunity for employment elsewhere (and if "elsewhere" allows CC) and make your decisions based on that.
The security officer quoted the policy. I had searched and could find no reference either way. There's no "cat" really, I went to the expert who knew the answer. My dilemma now is to figure out what, if anything I should do. I like the pepper spray idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Good replies. My point, which I want to emphasize here is that having a firearm is NOT the solution to everything. And you must do a vulnerability and reaction analysis of a situation. Among the top priorities is how can you gain time, distance and cover. For example you can buy a briefcase with a bullet-resistant lining. If you had that at your desk it would give you some cover and some time if a shady character popped in with a firearm. If you were really in a dangerous area you could ask security to install metal detectors. What is the history of violence at your workplace, for example. Are there signs posted out front (actually those are worse for the occupants than any BGs, declaring you're ripe for the picking).

Are you in a first floor office? Can you escape out a window. If you have to lock your door, is it a substantial barrier? Maybe you could ask for a better door, given that you can't arm yourself?

These are among the options you should be investigating. If it's really not a dangerous area, then ask if you're really just bemoaning being limited more than needing a firearm.

In the absence of any mitigating factors, if you were really in a dangerous area, then you'd lock your door at the least, and change jobs at the most.
I went almost two years in the facility without one, so I'm still trying to decide if that's the issue or if I'm just more aware of my vulnerability at this point.
 

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Your company "should" have a clear cut policy on firearms and anything else prohibited. That would have been the place to check, not with the security officer. Lack of a policy is "no" policy. But now you've let the cat out of the bag.

Evaluate the actual risks/need for SD at your workplace, the opportunity for employment elsewhere (and if "elsewhere" allows CC) and make your decisions based on that.
I agree with this. We have an employee policy book with the standard boiler plate company rules and regs. Firearm prohibition in the workplace is spelled out in black and white unfortunately. Of course I recently have gotten an under the seat car gun safe which I had bolted down to the car frame so I feel a lot safer if some workplace violence should erupt all I have to do is make it out and to my car. Not a perfect scenario, but at least I will not be gunned down in the parking lot.
 
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