Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 111 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
36,757 Posts
I don't know anyone who carries one all the time, but I know several instructors who carry them at the range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,726 Posts
Discussion Starter #3

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,686 Posts
I (almost) always have one. It's called...my belt. Only problem? Holding-up my pants trying to distance myself from the cause of my tourniquet! :blink:

A 2-3 ft. piece of latex tubing is light, compact & HANDY!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,276 Posts
Honestly, tourniquets are one of those things that people buy thinking it makes them 'prepared' but few actually understand how to use them. There's some specific training that is honestly needed for a tourniquet to be effective as well as having the knowledge to understand when it's appropriate to even go to one.

If you're going to carry one, invest in the proper training to use one.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
19,639 Posts
Honestly, tourniquets are one of those things that people buy thinking it makes them 'prepared' but few actually understand how to use them. There's some specific training that is honestly needed for a tourniquet to be effective as well as having the knowledge to understand when it's appropriate to even go to one.

If you're going to carry one, invest in the proper training to use one.
And when you have the training, you don't need to carry one. Field expedients are readily available.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,379 Posts
I have been carrying a Cat and a SWAT-T for some time now. Along with a Hotel room key wrapped in 3 feet of Duct Tape.

Recent trauma course I went to. I have a video of me and 3 people are trying to apply a tourniquet. Fake blood is everywhere. He actually put the TQ on me and one of the other first resoponders. One guy started doing chest compressions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,726 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
And when you have the training, you don't need to carry one. Field expedients are readily available.
This seems to be another one of those issues, like caliber wars, where the opinions vary pretty widely. Some people seem to think they work much better than trying to use a belt, while others say they're a waste of time. Call me dazed and confused. :blink:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,890 Posts
FWIW a normal sized tampon will slow a torso wound.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Panadero

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,094 Posts
I guess I'm in the belt or cordage camp.
I can see how a dedicated tourniquet to toss in with your other first aid stuff would be a nice convenience though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,276 Posts
And when you have the training, you don't need to carry one. Field expedients are readily available.
Well I wouldn't say that's 100% accurate but I get where you're going and don't really disagree. And I would also add that I'm no expert on field medicine, advanced first aid or any similar field... Which is one reason why I don't carry one of them or any other advanced first aid supplies. I've had some basic first aid, BLS and AED classes and have enough appreciation for what I've learned to know that there's more that I don't know than what I do.

I think for people with advanced first aid training, or any specific training covering tourniquets, having a real one ready to go is much better than having to improvise one with less than ideal circumstances surrounding you. If you don't have that training, it'd be like carrying a gun but not having any honest idea of how to use it.

I read some study many years back about the use and misuse of tourniquets. It was pretty interesting. Lots of ways their use can go pear shaped. I've never felt that, for me personally, it was worth the time and effort to really put in learning about their use. Hopefully that won't ever come back to bite me but I guess if things are ever that bad, I'll just try what I know and hope the rest works out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,379 Posts
This seems to be another one of those issues, like caliber wars, where the opinions vary pretty widely. Some people seem to think they work much better than trying to use a belt, while others say they're a waste of time. Call me dazed and confused. :blink:
Yes you can pull your belt off and make a tourniquet But in the moment i don't want to have to make something. I would rather pull one and apply it to stop traumatic bleeding. Its about the right tool for the right job. What about it of you have to use on on yourself? A Cat or a SWAT T is much easier to apply than a belt or strips of shirt that you bit in half. Carrying a a TQ is not just about shootings, or defensive encounters, chances are you more likely to use one if you come across a car accident. The recent course I took the instructor who was EMT and instructor out of Maryland, along with a former IDF Medic, told us that during the Boston bombing people more people were saved because the cops had IFAKs and combat style tourniquets.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
19,639 Posts
This seems to be another one of those issues, like caliber wars, where the opinions vary pretty widely. Some people seem to think they work much better than trying to use a belt, while others say they're a waste of time. Call me dazed and confused. :blink:
Holding WFR cert and trained on how to apply, where to apply based on injury and time left on is key to a blood flow restriction being successful, not what's used to affect the desired results of slowing arterial blood flow.

SAR hasn't recommended I carry one specifically in the field pack with medical equipment.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,276 Posts
I guess I'm in the belt or cordage camp.
I can see how a dedicated tourniquet to toss in with your other first aid stuff would be a nice convenience though.
I do know that cordage is bad... You can actually cut the limb and create more problems than you had before. A tourniquet, I think, should be over 1.5 inches wide. I'm really having to think back but it's something like that. Belts aren't great because they can stretch and break but it would be a better alternative than paracord or rope. There's lots to consider but I think the single most important thing to consider is if it's truly needed at all. If I remember correctly, most wounds are not tourniquet necessary wounds, but as that saying goes, if all you've got is a hammer, everything starts looking like a nail.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,379 Posts
I don't either, but I think this is small enough and light enough to carry. If not, one goes in my bail-out pack, hunting pack, and range bag.

View attachment 182042

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003EGD8Y...UTF8&colid=JX8TSSM5ZT2S&coliid=I32UA8M0E6PCIG
Be careful with Amazon and TQ, there was a lot of fake ones from China found on Amazon that were breaking the windless.

This is what most of my friends carry on them. https://ratsmedical.com fastest for one handed application, problem is it causes the most tissue damage. But its super fast.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,439 Posts
Tourniquets are a wonderful thing, but people focus on them too much, at least in my opinion. what are you going to do if you take a shot to the chest, aside from have a higher chance of dying than a shot to an extremity? If you want to carry tourniquets great, but I would consider what you will do for torso injuries. Read page 3 on the link

https://www.interagencyboard.org/sy... civilian public mass shooting fatalities.pdf


would surgical tubing work?
Tourniquets work well because of the tremendous amount of pressure that they put on the wound. If you've never had one put on you before, it hurts.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Hoganbeg
1 - 20 of 111 Posts
Top