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I've been seeing IDPA stuff the more I look into supplemental training resources. It seems pretty intense, but something I want to attend and even get into.
Start by going to the IDPA website and read up on the organization, what they're trying to accomplish and the rules. Then, if I were you, I would try to go to at least a couple, if not three, IDPA matches hosted by different people. The reason I say this is that some match hosts stick closer to the intent of IDPA than others. Also, some hosts will have nights that are oriented more to new shooters and others that are more complex. Ask when they might be holding qualifiers and matches for newcomers. If I ever went to a match where a stage had you shooting at 6-10 people, I would move on to another club because, IMO, that host has moved more into gamesmanship, which is far from the intent of IDPA.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Start by going to the IDPA website and read up on the organization, what they're trying to accomplish and the rules. Then, if I were you, I would try to go to at least a couple, if not three, IDPA matches hosted by different people. The reason I say this is that some match hosts stick closer to the intent of IDPA than others. Also, some hosts will have nights that are oriented more to new shooters and others that are more complex. Ask when they might be holding qualifiers and matches for newcomers. If I ever went to a match where a stage had you shooting at 6-10 people, I would move on to another club because, IMO, that host has moved more into gamesmanship, which is far from the intent of IDPA.
I know, I know. I should be working right now but I'm not only on the forum, I'm checking out the website as well! I think I'm going to do just that because I really like what I see. I think that would be really great to get into, and especially at least check out.
 

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I've got my gun belt. I've got my kydex AIWB holster in the mail. I'm looking for a solid OWB holster for the range, and first and foremost, I've got my G19.

This begs me to ask the question, "Now what?"

I know that it is important for my peace of mind to carry, for both me and my wife's saftey. However, I have no formal firearms training besides my fair share of range time.
I suggest that a new shooter (or at least a new carrier) mixed with a striker fired weapon and an AIWB holster is simply a recipe for disaster. I'm not discouraging you from carrying by any means, but I would suggest you look at a strong side IWB holster as you learn to carry. In that configuration, the gun is naturally pointed away from your body when drawing and holstering. Well, mostly. In AIWB, which I am seriously considering myself, the gun is naturally pointed at you during these critical times, and quite often just while sitting.

Develop some real comfort with your weapon before you add something as complex as AIWB.

Just my $.02, and worth what you paid for it.
 

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I know, I know. I should be working right now but I'm not only on the forum, I'm checking out the website as well! I think I'm going to do just that because I really like what I see. I think that would be really great to get into, and especially at least check out.
I joined the IDPA shortly after they began. I only stopped going to the matches because life got in the way (got married, started having more kids, got divorced and became a single father, etc.). However, I'm at a point where things are smoothing out again, so I'm about to start back up with them. What I really like about it was that the scenarios made you think under pressure (if you had a really good match admin, they were really awesome), it tested and validated your equipment choices (weapon, holster and I always ran at least one match with my carry ammo that I'd shoot up when I was about to replace with fresh stock) and you could get ideas on improving your technique from some really good shooters.
 

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Gun games not suitable training in my estimation. The tactics, strategics, mindset and overall context is seemingly all wrong. Its more of a choreographed dance which employs shooting as a central element. It does foster good gun handling and general marksmanship at the risk of potential scars as a result of habit action, at least in my opinion anyway.
 

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Kudo's, Cpt_Quail, for your thoughtfulness in recognizing the seriousness and need for knowledge/training in beginning to carry. It really is nice to see someone looking to do things correctly. I, and I am certain, many others on this forum, appreciate your wisdom.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
I suggest that a new shooter (or at least a new carrier) mixed with a striker fired weapon and an AIWB holster is simply a recipe for disaster. I'm not discouraging you from carrying by any means, but I would suggest you look at a strong side IWB holster as you learn to carry. In that configuration, the gun is naturally pointed away from your body when drawing and holstering. Well, mostly. In AIWB, which I am seriously considering myself, the gun is naturally pointed at you during these critical times, and quite often just while sitting.

Develop some real comfort with your weapon before you add something as complex as AIWB.

Just my $.02, and worth what you paid for it.
Thank you for the honest input!

It took me so long to get back to you because of the storm here in FL and the plethora of other things that came along with it.

One of the reasons I chose an AIWB holster was because it was very straightforward, unlike something I would set up anywhere near my 4 o'clock. I've looked at things like the super-tuck, but I'm just not sure what will work best for me.
 

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I started learning with competition shooting. Not sanctioned IDPA meets, but a local group that functioned very much the same way. Then, when Gramps and I went to serious self defense shooting classes, I had the basics and a lot of the muscle memory. Learning the difference between the games and real life defense was not difficult, and I incorporated what I learned into the games - like being super aware of not having any part of your body sticking out beyond a barrier except the gun hands and eyes with which to aim (concealment or cover, either kind), not shooting your gun to slide lock, and many other details.

Tons of articles written about the differences.

I do not think they are mutually exclusive, but feel strongly that it is important to get the self defense training - whether first thing or later on, but not too much later. :wave:
 
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