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KOMA AM 1520 Clear Channel 100 KW with Charlie Tuna from Oklahoma City played rock and roll in the 1960s and covered most of the Western US when it went high power at night. I picked it up occasionally in Viet Nam.

XERF AM 1570 with Wolfman Jack from Ciudad Acuña, Mexico with 250 KW.
Everybody in Sioux Falls South Dakota where I grew up also listened to KOMA. It was THE station to listen to.
 

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I was working in AM radio in the 1980’s at WPTF in NC. Loved it, back when we still had typewriters and doing on-air commercials was fun. I imagine things now are so much different, we did have a (one) computer and it took up a whole room.

When we first started carrying Rush people would get so bent. The girls in the Radio and TV section would take turned sitting at the switchboard (a giant telephone with lots of buttons for the young’ins) when the switchboard lady would go to lunch.
We would get cussed out all the time by callers when Rush made them mad, it was really funny.

I still like talk radio. :yup:

Good thread Scotty 👍🏻
 

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WLS and KOMA were favorite late night stations. Mornings Mom always had WCCO on with Boone and Erickson.

Local stations growing up were almost all country stations.
 

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Growing up I listened to KOOL 96.5 FM and KLIX 1310 AM. 96.5 was (and still is) classic rock, and KLIX is talk radio. I also remember listening to Art Bell late at night. He was my background noise to go to sleep by...
 

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I grew up on the Jersey side of the lower Hudson valley. Still pretty rural in the 50s, save 1 or 2 from Newark all the radio and TV stations we got were based in NYC and broadcast from the Empire State Building. These are the radio stations and personalities I grew up listening to (all AM):

WNEW - Klavan and Finch, William B. Williams
WINS - Murry the K!
WMCA - Harry Harrison, Jack Spector, B. Mitchell Reed
WABC - Cousin Brucie (Bruce Morrow), Herb Oscar Anderson, Dan Ingram, Scott Muni, Bobaloo Lewis

Summering on Cape Cod (MA) from the late 50s on, the primary radio station was WOCB (AM), the lone survivor of the Yankee Network (long sad story there re the history of FM radio).

Lastly, we only tuned into WCBS for Yankees baseball games, but Mel Allen's mlellow drawl voice was instantly recognizable: "and the sahds are retahd" at the end of an inning.

Great memories - good thread, scotty!
 

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Growing up I listened to KOOL 96.5 FM and KLIX 1310 AM. 96.5 was (and still is) classic rock, and KLIX is talk radio. I also remember listening to Art Bell late at night. He was my background noise to go to sleep by...
Yes, Art Bell kept me up past my bedtime many nights.
 

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A couple of old favorites from when I was a kid in SW Missouri. KGBX carried the St. Louis Cardinal baseball games, which were broadcast from KMOX in St. Louis. Jack Back and Mike Shannon called those games. "It's going, going, GONE!" Today, KGBX is a contemporary rock station, whatever that is.

KWTO-FM Rock 99 was another favorite. It was THE Radio station for Rock and Roll. Today I understand it's ESPN radio - 24 hour sports talk radio.

Your favorite radio stations/announcers from long ago?
Back in the SF bay area in the latish fifties, KSFO had the Don Sherwood show in the morning. I was eight to ten, and didn't get most of the humor until later, but the fun, satire, and ebullience of the morning program had a good effect on me.

I'm certain that a whole bunch of commuters were sometimes late to work because they sat in parking garages waiting for Sherwood to finish some of his clever and hilarious skits.

Good thread, Scotty, thanks!

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Back in the SF bay area in the latish fifties, KSFO had the Don Sherwood show in the morning. I was eight to ten, and didn't get most of the humor until later, but the fun, satire, and ebullience of the morning program had a good effect on me.

I'm certain that a whole bunch of commuters were sometimes late to work because they sat in parking garages waiting for Sherwood to finish some of his clever and hilarious skits.

Good thread, Scotty, thanks!

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...And I had completely forgotten Bob and Ray: Clever and hilarious skits on morning radio, on the East side of the continent, at about the same time. (But I don't remember which station carried them.)
 

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...And I had completely forgotten Bob and Ray: Clever and hilarious skits on morning radio, on the East side of the continent, at about the same time. (But I don't remember which station carried them.)
If someone does not know Bob and Ray, then he or she needs to google or youtube the slow talkers of America, a skit that I still laugh at, even though I know every word. Many other great skits from Bob and Ray, and many of these were extemporaneous.
 
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Growing up I listened to KFMO AM radio located in Flat River, MO broadcast daily from 6:00 am to 11:00 pm unless there was a St. Louis Cardinals baseball game on the west coast, which was rebroadcast from KXOK in St. Louis. Harry Carey, Jack Buck, and Joe Garagiola were my favorite announcers int he 50's and 60's. Late at night I listened to the "skip" 50,000 watts of power AM radio stations WSM out of Nashville, WWL out of New Orleans, and WLS Chicago.
 

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I grew up in the Midwest and the best radio came out of Chicago: WLS

"Eighty-nine, double-u ELL ess" Larry Lujack, etc were the best DJs back in the late 60s.

Anyone remember KAAY out of Little Rock and their "Bleecker Street" underground rock on late night?

And, as a Cardinals fan, KOMX from St Louis was a must.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
...And I had completely forgotten Bob and Ray: Clever and hilarious skits on morning radio, on the East side of the continent, at about the same time. (But I don't remember which station carried them.)
... and not so long ago, don't forget Tom and Ray - Click and Clack Talk Cars.
 

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WGIV was the "soul" station when I was in high school in NC. Mostly Motown music at the time. "WGIV, that black spot on your dial" was the promo.
 

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In the 1950's I listened to WEAM Radio (AM) on 1390. Johnny Dark was the best DJ on that station. In the late 50's he hosted the Top's TeleQuest Show, which was broadcast from a trailer on one of the Top's Drive-In restaurants. Kids could make requests for songs and include dedications and they would be read and played.

In the 1960's, WPGC (FM) was the station to listen to when you were a teenager. Harv Moore and Big 'ole Fat ole Deano (Dean Griffith) were the best of their DJ's. 'PGC probably had the best playlist and was a strong competitor for WEAM Radio.

In the 1980's, I loved listening to The Greaseman on DC101 (WWDC) on the drive in to work. He really pushed the envelope with his story "bits" and his innuendos. It was great when sitting at a traffic light and suddenly over half of the people in cars around you started laughing at the same time. You knew who they were listening to. The man was hilarious.

Now I just listen to SiriusXM, mostly their 60's channel with Phlash Phelps. He has some great stories about the artists and that man has been to pretty much ever state and county in the nation.
 

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I grew up on the Jersey side of the lower Hudson valley. Still pretty rural in the 50s, save 1 or 2 from Newark all the radio and TV stations we got were based in NYC and broadcast from the Empire State Building. These are the radio stations and personalities I grew up listening to (all AM):

WNEW - Klavan and Finch, William B. Williams
WINS - Murry the K!
WMCA - Harry Harrison, Jack Spector, B. Mitchell Reed
WABC - Cousin Brucie (Bruce Morrow), Herb Oscar Anderson, Dan Ingram, Scott Muni, Bobaloo Lewis

Summering on Cape Cod (MA) from the late 50s on, the primary radio station was WOCB (AM), the lone survivor of the Yankee Network (long sad story there re the history of FM radio).

Lastly, we only tuned into WCBS for Yankees baseball games, but Mel Allen's mlellow drawl voice was instantly recognizable: "and the sahds are retahd" at the end of an inning.

Great memories - good thread, scotty!
My stations in Brooklyn/my memory:urla9ub:
 

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And then there was KMOD-FM, Tulsa, Oklahoma, where radio personalities Brent Douglas and Phil Stone created the character Roy D. Mercer, calling unsuspecting persons and unleashing a big ol can of whup-ass on them.
 

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KOMA Oklahoma City for many years. During my high school years, we lived in an area where XERF was not very strong (we were too close) so it was great when Wolfman Jack syndicated his show and KOMA started carrying him.

In 1963, Smith ("Wolfman Jack") took his act to the border when the Inter-American Radio Advertising's Ramon Bosquez hired him and sent him to the studio and transmitter site of XERF-AM at Ciudad Acuña in Mexico, a station whose high-powered border blaster signal could be picked up across much of the United States. In an interview with writer Tom Miller, Smith described the reach of the XERF signal: "We had the most powerful signal in North America. Birds dropped dead when they flew too close to the tower. A car driving from New York to L.A. would never lose the station." Most of the border stations broadcast at 250,000 watts, five times the U.S. limit, meaning that their signals were picked up all over North America, and at night as far away as Europe and the Soviet Union. It was at XERF that Smith developed his signature style (with phrases like "Who's this on the Wolfman telephone?") and widespread fame. The border stations made money by renting time to Pentecostal preachers and psychics, and by taking 50 percent of the profit from anything sold by mail order. The Wolfman did pitches for dog food, weight-loss pills, weight-gain pills, rose bushes, and baby chicks. There was even a pill called Florex, which was supposed to enhance one's sex drive. "Some zing for your ling nuts," the Wolfman would say.
BTW XERF went off the air in the late 1960's but was resurrected in 1983 - running at the original amazing power level of 250,000 watts!

 
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