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Discussion Starter #21
One of the best drills to practice is one that hones your grip on your sidearm. And it will improve your accuracy and consistency.

Get a small postit, the 3" square ones are fine, and stick it on a door. Then back up so that you are 5 or 6 feet away from it. There are five things you are going to practice with this drill: draw, shooting stance, grip, sight alignment, and trigger discipline. This is like studying martial arts. You learn how to properly perform the moves, punches, kicks, blocks, and attacks. You are taught all of this and a lot more in order to give you a bucket of tools from which to draw upon should the need arise. However when on the street and needing to use your skills, you'll resort to what works best for you. This drill with the postit note is the same thing. You want to learn proper technique to the point where it becomes second nature and you naturally resort to muscle memory training. However, in reality anything can happen. But you need the basics and the tools to be cast into your being.

Of the five parts of the drill, one of the most important is your grip. The basic rule is 60/40. This means that 60% of the force used to hold and steady that gun should come from your support hand and 40% from your shooting hand. And you want to really grip that gun firmly with most of the gripping force coming from your support hand. This has multiple benefits. It gives you a steady platform from which to fire, a steady sight picture, improves your trigger discipline, and increases your rate of fire. Use the postit note and start at a normal controlled speed that allows you to do the exercises properly. Over time and repetition, your speed will naturally increase. Your goal is to be able to draw your gun from concealment and deliver two shots at a minimum, within two seconds. Of course, you are not going to be "shooting" your gun in your home. But simulate it with dry fire on the first shot and a pull of the trigger on the second one... don't break your trigger.

Do this every day, maybe 25 to 50 times in each session and you'll be amazed how you'll look in two months. Just make sure you concentrate on that grip. It really does work.
Thanks a lot. I will start doing this daily as of tonight. Great analogy. As a martial artist it really drove the point home.
 

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Thanks a lot. I will start doing this daily as of tonight. Great analogy. As a martial artist it really drove the point home.
I also studied martial arts many years ago and what I wrote is what our instructor taught us. He wanted to give us the tools to learn techniques and skills from which to draw upon. Then he added that if you ever have to use your skills on the street, all those complicated and "fancy" moves are probably out the window and you will resort to simplicity and what you do best. He was an excellent instructor and is well known in the world of Tae Kwon Do.

This same mindset works with defensive shooting skills. You learn the basics and hone them into your muscle memory but when the SHTF, you resort to simplicity. In an extreme encounter, you are probably not going to have the time to get a perfect sight picture so as you develop, try to only focus on that front sight to the extent that you are working towards point shooting. Speed of getting that gun out and getting off the first round or two is going to be your friend.

I'll add more later.
 

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Choose one that works best for you. Stick with it and be consistent.

What’s best? Depends on what you want to achieve. From a medical trauma perspective getting shot front thru is preferable to shot thru the side. Adjust accordingly if that concerns you.

I will second this concerning the medical trauma.
 

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For attempting to shoot nice tight groups the first video below covers what to do about at good as possible and notice his pistol is not perfectly vertical , its got about 10 to 15* cant to his left , That's a natural grip .

LucktGunner has a video thats pretty good for defensive one handed basics - How to Shot a Pistol One-Handed .

Then you find what works best for you both strong side and weak side .

 

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There has been a lot of good advice written in this thread and hiring a qualified instructor to watch what you are doing and coach you to use better options may be the quickest way to reach your goals.

In a real-world scenario, you are going to be acting on instinct and training. A debilitating injury to your strong side which requires you to use your weak hand for shooting would have you instinctively blading your injured side away from further violence and aiming - sight picture - may no longer be an option because your assailant is only bad-breath distance away.

Strengthening your non-dominant hand and arm to closely mirror your strong side will give you better results when shooting weak hand drills. I use VIVE balls and a Luxon grip strengthener in addition to regular resistance training at the fitness center (pre-COVID-19 shutdown). The same grip mechanics apply for both strong and weak hand shooting. Keep shooting with both eyes open all the time.
 

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There has been a lot of good advice written in this thread and hiring a qualified instructor to watch what you are doing and coach you to use better options may be the quickest way to reach your goals.

In a real-world scenario, you are going to be acting on instinct and training. A debilitating injury to your strong side which requires you to use your weak hand for shooting would have you instinctively blading your injured side away from further violence and aiming - sight picture - may no longer be an option because your assailant is only bad-breath distance away.

Strengthening your non-dominant hand and arm to closely mirror your strong side will give you better results when shooting weak hand drills. I use VIVE balls and a Luxon grip strengthener in addition to regular resistance training at the fitness center (pre-COVID-19 shutdown). The same grip mechanics apply for both strong and weak hand shooting. Keep shooting with both eyes open all the time.
Yes sir, spot on. I have held for some time now that if you are faced with an extreme encounter, the speed at which you can get your gun into action and get off the first shots is going to give you the best chance of ending the fight. Even a hit to an adversary's arm or his lower abdomen or a hand is going to momentarily give him pause. That just might buy you the time you need to get off more precise shots to end hostilities. For this reason, none of my carry guns have externally settable safeties, with the exception of one. I don't want anything in the way of my "pull and pull", pulling the gun and pulling the trigger. The one exception I mentioned is my vacation gun which happens to be a first gen M&P 9 Shield. The reason for the safety is that this gun tends to get moved from holster to glove box and back to holster in some states. So a settable safety makes sense for this gun. But when it is on my person, that safety is off.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I also studied martial arts many years ago and what I wrote is what our instructor taught us. He wanted to give us the tools to learn techniques and skills from which to draw upon. Then he added that if you ever have to use your skills on the street, all those complicated and "fancy" moves are probably out the window and you will resort to simplicity and what you do best. He was an excellent instructor and is well known in the world of Tae Kwon Do.

This same mindset works with defensive shooting skills. You learn the basics and hone them into your muscle memory but when the SHTF, you resort to simplicity. In an extreme encounter, you are probably not going to have the time to get a perfect sight picture so as you develop, try to only focus on that front sight to the extent that you are working towards point shooting. Speed of getting that gun out and getting off the first round or two is going to be your friend.

I'll add more later.
Couldn't agree more. I would see it time and time again at my boxing and MMA gyms. You would see guys with 4-5 months training with great technique on the heavybag. The second they get punched their first few times sparring they resort to swinging for the fences and look like they have never trained before. It takes a few more sparring sessions before they are able to even learn to utilize the tools they have learned(and in boxing its really only 3 tools straights, hooks, and upper cuts).

Thank you. I will be looking forward to the addition. I have been looking into point shooting and that is certainly something I would like to work towards.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
For attempting to shoot nice tight groups the first video below covers what to do about at good as possible and notice his pistol is not perfectly vertical , its got about 10 to 15* cant to his left , That's a natural grip .

LucktGunner has a video thats pretty good for defensive one handed basics - How to Shot a Pistol One-Handed .

Then you find what works best for you both strong side and weak side .

Thank you. I wasn't really aware of the canting. I am going to try that out. Is this the lucky gunner video you are referring to?
 

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They are not lol. I always have to re aim for follow up shots. Any tips?
That solid grip I mentioned. The gun more naturally returns to point of aim when doing this.
 
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Follow through is most like practice shooting skeet and trap. Your barrel is following a moving target, if you stop following at the moment you pull the trigger the shot will pass behind the target. As your barrel swings to track the target you must continue that track after the trigger, Or follow through the target.
When you are dry firing your pistol, the recoil won't knock you off target. Concentrate in keeping that sight picture after the hammer fall. You will get to where your brain locks on to the sight picture as the bullet is fired. As you get better at it you will be able to "Call your shots". You will know from that sight picture where that bullet hit. From that flash picture you should be able to say "I hit the target at the 6 o clock about an inch low" and be very close when you look at the target.

It also wires your brain to resist recoil and try to keep the gun still. And if you are focused on the target, your sights will return to it after recoil.

If you are good at this it also helps with Threat Focused shooting. Once you have that focus then its just another skill that you will add on. Good Luck. DR
 

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bodan399 Yes that is the video .
Don't get to carried away trying the shoot with some tight grip one handed and keeping a sight picture as that's not going to happen . Work more on maintaining firm grip that controls gun movement in the hand so that your sight picture returns quicker with practice . You do want to work to control your wrist movement . Recoil energy has to go somewhere so let your arm absorb the recoil and sights will move off target but you just work with it and improve over time and rounds down range . A shot timer is the one thing that tells you how slow quick you are and how you improve with time .
 

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One Handed Shooting

For the closest encounters I think that you should also be familiar and capable of shooting from the draw one-handed with the pistol or revolver at waist height. Draw and point shooting one-handed use to be more common before two-handed became the norm.

Bill Jordan No Second Place Winner.png Bill Jordan 1.jpg
 

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In a defensive shooting class I took, it was recommended, when shooting one hand, lean forward, gun at 1/2 arm length and make a fist with your support hand on your chest, if thread is far, if is a close encounter, lean back gun by your side waist high. This was a long time ago, these techniques might be antiquated by now.
 

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Some good information posted. +1 on Brownie's videos if you want to learn point shooting.
Everything has to start with fundamentals. Without a good foundation, you will not be the best you are capable of when you move on to more advanced tasks.

Some get hung up on having tight groups. That's fine at the range. Most of my targets look like shotgun patterns. For close quarters defence, that's ok in my opinion.

I walk with a cane and do a majority of my training and practice with one hand because that is my reality.
Very little of my defensive practice is sighted fire. Most encounters happen at close range. That doesn't mean neglect the sights for longer distances or when precision is needed. It's more of a continuum.

Dry fire and laser cartridge is probably the most important part of my training/practice. I try to make it applicable to my every day life. I live on a farm and work around machinery, so I make it a point to spend time practicing in that environment.
I drove delivery for a number of years and would set in the car and practice drawing and shooting while buckled in the driver's seat.
 

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I believe @Mike 1956 has it right. If you are trying to remember 37 different things you will be over thinking it. Get a solid grip, get the muzzle pointed at the target ( I like to have the front sight in my field of view if possible ) and don't jerk the trigger. KISS. Who knows - you might be flat on your back with a mouth full of your own blood at the time.
 
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