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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have begun carrying with one in the chamber. (A discussion for another thread) Do you ever remove the round from the chamber? A co-worker removes the cartridge each night. Before bed/shower I remove gun from holster and place into bedside drawer, it stays there loaded until morning when I place it in my holster again. Am I missing something in being a responsible gun owner?

On another note, the same co-worker complains that his hollow point bullet gets overly deformed (to the point of failing to load) from the repetitive loading and unloading.
 

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I do have to unload when traveling into illinois. You do have to keep an eye out for the bullet ending up pushed back into the casing.
 

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I have begun carrying with one in the chamber. (A discussion for another thread) Do you ever remove the round from the chamber? A co-worker removes the cartridge each night. Before bed/shower I remove gun from holster and place into bedside drawer, it stays there loaded until morning when I place it in my holster again. Am I missing something in being a responsible gun owner?

On another note, the same co-worker complains that his hollow point bullet gets overly deformed (to the point of failing to load) from the repetitive loading and unloading.
Not to me. I would think that removing the cartridge each night (for what reason?) would just increase the opportunity for a negligent discharge. I would pretty much do what you were doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
No, I dont. Your friend is apt to have a problem with bullet setback if he keeps reusing the shell he removes each night. That leads to over pressurization of that particular round.
I have seen the bullet, it's like the hollow point is just compressed in on itself. Apparently from the repeated impacts with the loading ramp on his 1911.
 

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Ok so I'll jump in on this because I do not yet have my CCW. So around the house I'm carrying +1. When I get into the car and take my MP, I have to unload and case/lock everything. Now I don't always chamber the same round. Sometimes I'll empty the mag and reload, but I'm interested to hear why constant (say once a day) chambering of a round can lead to discharge. Its the second time I've heard about it in around 6 hrs. Can anyone drop some knowledge on me? FWIW, I use the Remington hollow points and have yet to have a deformed one from chambering.

Thanks!

-Kyle
 

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Only if I need the gun unloaded and cleared. Otherwise same rule applies - no way to guarantee anywhere you'll have a free hand to rack a slide.
 
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Nope I don't remove it till it flies through the end of the barrel. Shoot them often enough to not have to worry about it and you'll be fine. When I was in the Navy we had to unload 45 rounds (15 in each mag) after every shift and the next shift had to reload. Rinse and repeat. 45 rounds per gun would be loaded and unloaded twice a day until we went to the range. Never had a problem with them being loaded and unloaded so much, but I personally prefer not to. Doesn't make sense every night. Once a week I do to make sure nothing works its way into the mag or anything (pocket carry)

Sent from my DROID RAZR cuz robots are cooler than fruit.
 

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A couple times a year, that bullet in the pipe goes down range. Other than that, I rarely unload my primary carry.

My other semi autos may get chambered and unloaded, but that bullet goes in the range box. Chambering a round a couple times shouldn't be detrimental, but if you begin to have trouble remembering how many times its been chambered, it's time for that round to exit the carry magazine.

My S&W 442 has a round in the chamber that gets reloaded infinitely. :smile:
 

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...in the night, should something occur, I have to think about gun, light, glasses, and maybe a shirt...I might forget to rack a round in...or might fumble it...or the noise might hurt my cause...so I only clear my weapon when I clean it...the rest of the time, it's safely fully loaded and ready for use...if you lay it down in a good holster that covers the trigger, that's enough to give you peace of mind ...
 

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Just to be clear; The round might well appear pristine. No apparent deformation. We are not talking about mashed up bullet heads, or anything.

But the OAL (overall length of the entire case& bullet) is decreased. This is caused by the bullet (the bullet head alone), being pushed back into the brass shell. You could be right, and your bullets are not affected. However, it would be interesting to take a pair of calipers to them, or line them up on a counter top & see.

Ok so I'll jump in on this because I do not yet have my CCW. So around the house I'm carrying +1. When I get into the car and take my MP, I have to unload and case/lock everything. Now I don't always chamber the same round. Sometimes I'll empty the mag and reload, but I'm interested to hear why constant (say once a day) chambering of a round can lead to discharge. Its the second time I've heard about it in around 6 hrs. Can anyone drop some knowledge on me? FWIW, I use the Remington hollow points and have yet to have a deformed one from chambering.

Thanks!

-Kyle
 

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Ok so I'll jump in on this because I do not yet have my CCW. So around the house I'm carrying +1. When I get into the car and take my MP, I have to unload and case/lock everything. Now I don't always chamber the same round. Sometimes I'll empty the mag and reload, but I'm interested to hear why constant (say once a day) chambering of a round can lead to discharge. Its the second time I've heard about it in around 6 hrs. Can anyone drop some knowledge on me? FWIW, I use the Remington hollow points and have yet to have a deformed one from chambering.

Thanks!

-Kyle
If you are referring to my post, I just think that the more times you load and unload guns the more opportunities it gives you to make a mistake. With due care, you can load and unload as often as you wish. I just don't like fooling around with it any more often than I have to, but that's just me.
 

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The only time my EDC gets unloaded is when its gets a cleaning or if for some reason I need to lock it away in my safe. Guns don't go in my safe loaded. As for your co-worker. Maybe he has kids and won't keep a loaded gun having them around. If that makes him feel better, that is fine. But, as others have said, he can't continue to chamber the same round repeatedly for the reasons stated. He is going to have to come up some sort of rotation and after reloading the same round a few times, throw it in with the range ammo and fire it away with the rest of the ammo.
 

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Ok so I'll jump in on this because I do not yet have my CCW. So around the house I'm carrying +1. When I get into the car and take my MP, I have to unload and case/lock everything. Now I don't always chamber the same round. Sometimes I'll empty the mag and reload, but I'm interested to hear why constant (say once a day) chambering of a round can lead to discharge. Its the second time I've heard about it in around 6 hrs. Can anyone drop some knowledge on me? FWIW, I use the Remington hollow points and have yet to have a deformed one from chambering.

Thanks!

-Kyle
The "discharge" is a negligent discharge. If you keep you gun holstered it's extremely hard to fire it negligently. When you take it out of the holster and start fiddlin' with it, your chances of proving that you are a mere mortal capable of making mistakes increases many fold.
 

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Load it and leave it be. Clear it to clean it or practice reloading or drawing. Other than that (and actually shooting), like the song goes, "Let it Be."
 

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NO!, AD's and ND's occur when clearing or reloading and chambering a gun. LEO's also have ND's when loading/unloading.

I clear my EDC when I go to the range to reload with plinking ammo, or when I'm going to clean it. If at all possible (depending on carry method) I never un-holster, but take the holster off with the gun in it. A good holster is part of the safety system. A reliable handgun will only discharge when it is being handled, so handle it as little as possible except for training and practice.

My HD handgun remains holstered in a FAS1 SAFE which has a built in holster, allowing me to draw directly from the safe which is beside the bed. It is cleared for trips to the range or cleaning only. When range time is hard to arrange in my schedule, they may remain chambered for weeks.
 
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I unload mine about once a month, through the barrel, I'll then fire a bunch of FMJ rounds as practice, then before I leave the range I'll load up with defensive rounds. Once I get home I'll unload to clean the gun, after that I'll load up the same rounds that were in it, a month later I'll repeat the cycle.
 

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If you are referring to my post, I just think that the more times you load and unload guns the more opportunities it gives you to make a mistake. With due care, you can load and unload as often as you wish. I just don't like fooling around with it any more often than I have to, but that's just me.
No one in particular, to be honest. My gun is holstered in either my serpa 2 or ohio special when sleeping or I'm not at home but the wife is. The only time like I said that it really gets cleared and reloaded is when entering/exiting my vehicle. I can understand ND's taking place due to mishandling and such. The impression I had gotten was that chambering and rechambering a particular round multiple times can lead the round to ND, not actually mistakenly pulling the trigger in the process.
 
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