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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Every time I have seen a p238 at a shop I ask to look at it. They always feel SWEET. But I've never carried or shot a SAO. Am I correct in assuming that I have to carry it cocked and locked?

Is it unsafe to carry uncocked?

I don't want to carry unchambered but I just don't know if I can carry cocked and locked.

I guess I don't like the idea of uncocking at end of day. Seems like it just increases probability of something dumb happening.

Am I missing something? Too concerned?

Thanks
 

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I would think that it has a decocker. My friend wanted to buy one for his wife, but she decided she wanted something else. I doubt he would buy her a gun that wa too complicated. I would ask the gun shop dealer for a better demo.
 

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Time to go read up on "Condition One" carry for 1911s.

Not speaking specifically about P238s, just the 1911-pattern gun - it was designed to be carried ready to shoot, with the thumb safety engaged. Army use with mounted cavalry favored an extra layer of safety so Browning incorporated the grip safety.

SA autos are generally less safe carried with the hammer down and a live round in the chamber. Notwithstanding various types of firing pin safeties, it is at least theoretically possible for the gun to discharge if the thumb safety is not engaged. The thumb safety on a 1911 blocks the sear, so the hammer simply can not connect with the firing pin to cause the gun to discharge.

Leaving the gun cocked and locked caused no harm. There is no reason to "uncock" at the end of the day, unless you are leaving the gun accessible to unauthorized people (like kids). "Administrative handling" of guns is responsible for a lot of NDs, so leave the gun as is unless there is a specific reason to render it in a non-ready condition. There's been a 1911 in Condition 1 on my night stand every night for years and it has yet to cause a problem.
 

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There is no decocker on the 238. You carry it cocked and locked, just like a 1911. In fact, the manual of arms is the same except the 238 has no grip safety.

They look good, they carry good, and they shoot good. Mine is a P238 Scorpion. I pocket carry it, and it is a honey.

There would be no need to uncock it at the end of the day. In fact, there would be no need to uncock it anytime. If you want to safe it, drop the mag, disengage the safety, rack the slide to clear the chamber, and then dry fire it.
 

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P238 has stiff safety

I have a Sig P238 and also a number of 1911s which I have carried. I would agree with those above who advocate carrying these guns cocked and locked with a round in the chamber and the manual safety engaged. This requires enough mental alertness to disengage the manual safety as an extra step between drawing the gun and pulling the trigger. If you forget to disengage the safety you can lose precious seconds while you figure out why your gun isn't firing, and could lose your life as a result. So if you are going to use such a gun, it is very important to practice this "draw, safety off, fire" routine many times until it becomes second nature. If you can't do this, you are best with a gun lacking a manual safety, such as a Glock, a revolver, a Sig, etc.

Having said this, however, there are some advantages of the single action, cocked and locked type of handgun. A big advantage is that every trigger pull is the same, and is likely to be a short, light, crisp trigger pull that enhances accuracy. So you are more likely to hit what you are aiming at with this important first shot.

And with respect to the Sig P238, I have noticed that the safety lever is pretty stiff, requiring a fair amount of force to switch on or off compared to most 1911s I have seen. This gives you an added measure of protection against the safety going from on to off without your conscious decision to do so. For a pocket carried gun I think that is what you want.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all of the help.

"Administrative handling" is exactly what I wanted to avoid. It's the reason I'm a little apprehensive about SA. I realized I was maybe being overly concerned because of ignorance so I just asked.

I appreciate the feedback. I'm DYING to shoot one of these but not a single friend has one and I hate to spend that kind of money for a test.
 

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Yarg, Find you a local Indoor Range. Most have a Rental gun setup so you can try it before you by it. These little Sigs are pretty popular so most have them to try out..
 

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The gun is designed to be safe when carried cocked and locked. For some reason many assume that it has a light trigger like a 1911. It has an 8 lb. trigger which means that even if somehow the manual safety came off safe (something that never happened to me in over 40 years) you will be presented with a trigger that requires 8 lbs of pressure to fire. If you had a Glock with no manual safety you would have a 5.5 lb. trigger. Which is safer? BTW, the gun also has a hammer safety notch that will catch the hammer before it strikes the firing pin should it somehow fail to stay back. Plus you can rack the slide to unload the gun with the manual safety on, something you cannot do with most guns. It is a very safe gun. Just looks scary to those more used to striker fired guns that cannot see the striker half cocked under tension.
 

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One of the other design features of the 238 is that a some of the administrative handling is different than the 1911. Racking the slide, chambering a round, clearing the chamber can be performed with the safety on...
 

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When I bought my Colt Mustang years ago.= Same as P238. I wasn't sure either. So I carried it around the house for a couple days with a loaded mag no round in the chamber. Cocked and locked...Nothing. So I tried it for a few days without the safety on. The hammer won't go down unless you pull the trigger. Cock and Locked in Condition one is safe. Or you would hear about alot of ADs with this type of gun by now. Just like when you hear it from a striker fire gun. Then ppl always comment how dangerous they are. Safe ime. Nice gun also
 

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The P238 is a sweet little gun, my wife has a p238 and p938 and she just loves the p238, my edc is a S&W Shield or XDsc, but sometimes I would rather have the versatility of taking her p238, it's just so easy to conceal under any clothes.
 

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238 has some kick. Didn't like it at all when I shot it. I like the shield much better :)
I do not know many people, including the many ladies who shoot around here, who think the P238 has a lot of recoil. The Shield is just a few ounces heavier and shoots a caliber that has a lot more energy than any .380. I have had both and never have shot a 9mm that has less recoil than a .380 but recoil is subjective. I have one person bugging me to buy my P238 because he feels it has much less recoil for his 70 year old hands than his Ruger SR9. Go figure.
 
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