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I really wanted to like shooting this gun. I liked the size and the weight. I liked the feel of it in my hands. I even liked the “ball in the bucket” sights. However it seems that the gun didn’t like my strong hand.

I took my son’s Glock 43 to my local indoor range this afternoon and put over 50 rounds through it. When shooting right-handed, with either a single or double-handed grip, with both eyes open, and just my right eye open, the rounds were consistently hitting low and slightly to the left.

For example, at three yards, right-handed, with the ball in the bucket and held right between the target’s eyes, the rounds would strike the target’s right cheek. However, when I switched to my left hand, the shots were right on the money (or in this particular case, right between the eyes). Also, after just a few shots, the trigger started irritating my right index finger. However, it didn’t bother my left index finger.

If I was a left-handed shooter, I might be shopping for my own 43 right now. But, I’m not, so I guess I’ll stick with my Sig P229 as my EDC for a while longer.
 
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I wanted to like my G43. I also shoot it low and left, but it’s just me and small guns. I shoot most full size/ compacts just fine. I’m having brass to the face issues and trouble getting used to the trigger.

I’ve resolved to make it work somehow.
 

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Maybe you ARE a left-handed shooter - and just didn't know it... :rolleyes:
I shoot rifles left-handed. If I had lived back in the "wild west" I'm pretty sure I'd have had one of those nice double rig set-ups, like Kevin Costner's character in the movie Silverado.

 

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I shoot rifles left-handed. If I had lived back in the "wild west" I'm pretty sure I'd have had one of those nice double rig set-ups, like Kevin Costner's character in the movie Silverado.

I used to carry a setup like that. I was about six years old. Mine were Mattel "Fanner 50's" as best I can recall.

The guns I carried at age six would get me killed in a lot of places today, probably by the cops. :mad:
 

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Try shooting the G43 with “more trigger finger”. By that I mean, place your finger further across the trigger so that you are almost using the first knuckle, rather than the pad.


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Try shooting the G43 with “more trigger finger”. By that I mean, place your finger further across the trigger so that you are almost using the first knuckle, rather than the pad.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
Yeah that and pull bacl straight at yourself. The 43 seems touchy about pulling with different parts of your finger or not doing a straight pull back. It just seems easier then most guns to pull off the target with the trigger finger.
 

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I had a "Fanner 50" too! With the spring-loaded bullets! Good times!

To the OP: I don't like Glock triggers either. They seem "spongy" to me, like a squirt gun. Yet another reason among many I will never own a Glock. Give me a 1911 trigger any day. Or even a good DA trigger.
 

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Mrs flh carrys a 43 she shoots it just fine left or right handed , slightly better with her left , when I shoot the 43 I have to adjust my finger slightly....
 

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I really wanted to like shooting this gun. I liked the size and the weight. I liked the feel of it in my hands. I even liked the “ball in the bucket” sights. However it seems that the gun didn’t like my strong hand.

I took my son’s Glock 43 to my local indoor range this afternoon and put over 50 rounds through it. When shooting right-handed, with either a single or double-handed grip, with both eyes open, and just my right eye open, the rounds were consistently hitting low and slightly to the left.

For example, at three yards, right-handed, with the ball in the bucket and held right between the target’s eyes, the rounds would strike the target’s right cheek. However, when I switched to my left hand, the shots were right on the money (or in this particular case, right between the eyes). Also, after just a few shots, the trigger started irritating my right index finger. However, it didn’t bother my left index finger.

If I was a left-handed shooter, I might be shopping for my own 43 right now. But, I’m not, so I guess I’ll stick with my Sig P229 as my EDC for a while longer.
sounds more like your strong hand didnt like the gun.
 

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I've been shooting and carrying a G43 for some time as a BUG or pocket carry when necessary. I also have a tendency to push it low left like I do with most pistols that have a short and narrow grip unless I consciously make adjustments. I will soon "retire" it from carry as I have been slowly working with a Shield .45 acp to replace it. I seem to take longer making switches of my carry firearms than I did when I was younger as I take longer to put rounds through them. I shoot the Shield .45 much better than the Glock G43. The longer length and slightly wider grip are what does it for me. I have been carrying a Glock 30S as primary carry and the Shield .45 might replace it, too, for most days.
 

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The finger placement is very important with the 43, especially if you have bear paws for hands like I do. Also in a proper two-handed firing grip out a little "outward tension"?? Basically twisting wrists from botttom of palm outward. It helps me lock it in and then I don't yank low left. I shoot my 43 as well as my 17, which is better than the 26 (still working on that one).

I'll always pick a larger gun if the situation allows but the 43 is my favorite regardless of carrying.
 

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A Glock that shoots low and to the left????

Here's my theory, based on my own experiences-- that stupid palm swell that is proportionally the same on every Glock, regardless of grip length, combined with the Glock trigger and grip angle, all conspire to make effective grip, wrist lock and trigger pull more difficult. Adjusting one's finger position on the trigger simply compensates for other errors in grip, wrist lock and trigger pull. I can slap the bejesus out the trigger and still get effective hits provided my grip and wrist lock are correct.
 

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It is a small narrow gun but, it fits me perfect. I don't do any finger or grip gyrations to make it "work" and the palm swell sits exactly where it should in my hands. I shot it much better than the single stack Shield, Walther, Kahr or Ruger.
If a gun takes so much trouble for someone to make it fit than I suggest you keep looking.
I liked the Shield and Walther as well and the slight difference in grip angle is irrelevant. God gave me the ability to turn my wrist with unconscious effort so not an issue for me.
 

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If you're grouping well low and left, drift the rear sight and get a shorter front sight. It's grouping that's important.
 

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If you're grouping well low and left, drift the rear sight and get a shorter front sight. It's grouping that's important.
True, grouping is more important than centered sights. I've bought a couple Glocks off of my buddy who is very good with his maintenance and round count logs. After buying the second one I realized I was shooting left with both. Apparently, he has some eye issues and drifts his sights to account for shooting off to the right - you'd never know it with how good of a shooter he is. I fixed that right away and now I'm happy, but it worked for him.
 

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Howdy!

From what your saying any firearms instructor should be able to look at the target and help you correct your shooting. If you are shooting left handed and the rounds are hitting Low and to the right you are anticipating the recoil and too much finger on the trigger. When you pull the trigger you are pushing the weapon. You should isolate the trigger finger and only have finger movement straight to the rear.

I have had plenty of Officer come to the range and state there sites were off. My response was shoot me a group and let’s see. It was always the shooter not the weapon. It can be fixed with time and training.

”Happy Trails”
Chiefneon
 
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