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Make sure you put as many “bullets” as your clip will hold, then don’t forget to hit the “slide release.” :smile::smile:
Pedantry, a thinking man's game..
 
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No matter how fast you are with a mag change, from what I've seen in FOF classes, and in the middle of the fight of your life YOU just lost. Unless you are behind cover, then being faster is better.

I hope 14 rounds gets me through the hot and heavy part of the fight
 

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I never timed my mag swap speed. I do it fast though because I count my shots. I carry 6+1. When six goes bang the fully loaded mag is about to be grabbed. I do a one hand shot of round 7.
 

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I carry a spare mag for malfunctions more or less. I'll need less than 13 rounds if I ever need one I hope.
I practice mag changes, Never timed them. A little over 2 seconds if I had to guess ; )
H/D
 

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Depends.....

Good days, bad days, Murphy.......

I have the reloads with the Glock down to about 1 second if I don't flub it and revolver @ 1.5 seconds. This is from running hundreds of matches on the timer.

It takes alot longer when it is really cold around -20 to -40 because of all the layers......
 

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No matter how fast you are with a mag change, from what I've seen in FOF classes, and in the middle of the fight of your life YOU just lost. Unless you are behind cover, then being faster is better.

I hope 14 rounds gets me through the hot and heavy part of the fight
That is why ANY good defensive shooting class should have a class about cover. My wife likes to walk in the mall..... Last night I spent a couple laps explaining cover vs concealment and showing her the difference.
 

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My thoughts on it are that there are more important things to concentrate one’s precious practice time on. A timer on the range is good for setting a standard, but is not indicative of what happens when the shtf.
It does give one a benchmark. Without a benchmark you have no accurate way to determine if you are doing well. Reloading is an important skill. Look up the Newhall, Ca incident. There was also a Dallas cop killed trying to reload his 1911 behind cover. It happens more often than one would think. Same goes for malfunction clearance.
 

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Claude Werner's study of 482 actual, documented non-LEO gunfights found only three situations where defenders reloaded, or 0.6% of the time. And one of those was a guy trying to stop an escaped tiger with a .32 auto. He succeeded, BTW, after 13 shots. So I am much more worried about ensuring I don't have to shoot to begin with, but if I do, the effect of my shots before I might need a reload. To me, reload times are not something I would ever worry about.
Yup, reload times are irrelevant. Until they're not.
 

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Yup, reload times are irrelevant. Until they're not.
You could say that about almost anything. There was a gun writer I used to follow years ago. I can't remember his name offhand. He was Vietnam vet. He was a big fan of snubbies and he got asked, "What would you really want to have if you got in gunfight?"

He said, "An M-60 with 300 rounds and a walkie talkie that I could direct artillery with. But that isn't all that practical here in the city, so I carry my snubby."

Grant Cunningham likes to say, "A platoon of N. Korean paratroopers could land on your front lawn." Then whatever you have will be irrelevant.
 

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I tried this exercise at the range this morning. It's been a few years since I've done it and honestly don't remember what my times were back then.

I timed it,10 times, from last shot to first shot. Average was 4.315 seconds. 442 pro with moonclips. (The moonclip was in the moonclip holder each time) The Pachmayr compac grip slowed me down a bit. Times would have been a tad faster with my wood grip and my Safariland comp 1 speed loaders I think.

I don't forsee myself ever having to reload in an actual gunfight, and if so, I'm sure it wouldn't be any where near the times I put up today under perfect conditions and the target not shooting back at me.
 

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You could say that about almost anything. There was a gun writer I used to follow years ago. I can't remember his name offhand. He was Vietnam vet. He was a big fan of snubbies and he got asked, "What would you really want to have if you got in gunfight?"

He said, "An M-60 with 300 rounds and a walkie talkie that I could direct artillery with. But that isn't all that practical here in the city, so I carry my snubby."

Grant Cunningham likes to say, "A platoon of N. Korean paratroopers could land on your front lawn." Then whatever you have will be irrelevant.
My best friend, who was a Vietnam Vet said once that...”The worst feeling in the world was when you reached for that extra magazine and found there wasn’t another one there!”
 

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There is a drill I practice where I draw, shoot one round, reload from slidelock, and shoot one round. I can accomplish it in about 4 seconds start to finish. This is from open carry.

I have not timed myself from concealment.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

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My father and uncles (both sides) were all combat veterans from WWII & Korea. When I announced that I was going to join the Corps (during Nam), at least one of them had me shooting once or twice a week. They had me shooting a variety of weapons from a 1911 to a M1 and a M14 (at the time I didn't know it was illegal to own). Each imparted the shooting skills they thought I needed to survive. One of the tenants they taught was to never, absolutely never, let an empty magazine be a surprise. The round count drills were merciless. At any given moment I had to know my exact round count. Being wrong was painful. For the 1911 the drills progressed to me drawing a magazine when I had 2-4 rounds remaining while still shooting. At slide lock, I drop the empty & load the next a spit second after the empty cleared the grip. From slide lock to the next round firing was sub-second. The result of my loving & cruel family's training followed my own relentless drills (in the Corps to today) I've never been surprised by any weapon slide locking on an empty magazine. In combat or at the range I never had to consciously count my rounds...I just know when to reach for a magazine before it runs out.

Like many of the families of the day, we had relatives come home under a flag. My father and uncles vowed that they would do whatever it takes to help the next generation of our family's warriors come home alive. So far, it has worked.
 
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