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Discussion Starter #1
I don't have children, it has been my choice. But every now and then I feel a pang of "I wish I had had a little girl..."

The picture reminds me of me and my Uncle when I was a little girl. He is good with kids, and I am the same way. He also turned me on to muscle cars and .44 magnums, lol.

Cop-Kid-Lunch-FB-Tara-Murphy.jpg

Here is the the article I pulled the photo from:

4-Yr-old Dreams of Taking Cop to Lunch for Her Birthday, See What He Did for Her
 

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Beautiful act of kindness? Shoot, he was treated to a free lunch at the best restaurant in Clarksburg... I say it was win-win.
 

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In the picture I see a little girl who is always going to remember that day. The expression on her face says to me she is not being talked down to, but talked to as a person and listened to. That was one of the things I liked best about my Uncle, he never talked down to me.
 

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I grew up near the home of Norman Rockwell and this reminds me of a lot of his paintings.
 

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Good post, Blackhawkgirl.
 
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Only one word to say ... PRICELESS .
 
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Dang it, I think I got a speck of dust in my eye...:blush:
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Great to see in this confusing world. My girls are 12, 18, 49, and 14 (Sandy our terrier mix). Sure don't know what I'd do with a son. :dupell:
I know I was a handful of adventurous, curious, smarty-pants as a little girl, but a good kid who mostly stayed out of trouble. I have often wondered what I would have been like if I had been born a boy instead, or what the world would have been like, good Lord!

I just thought things like growing up to be an astronaut was more exciting than a nurse; playing with my muscle cars more exciting than playing with baby dolls; and learning to shoot gave me more freedom than trying to run from a purp in high heels.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not diminishing the effect of this photo, cops do stuff like this all the time for kids. 99% of it goes unnoticed.
I know you are right. With all the turmoil on DC lately, and police not being able to protect themselves (and others) since the Ferguson effect, I felt a move in focus to a positive direction was in order.
 

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Mikey and I were coming back to Cambridge from the Cleveland Clinic.
We'd just made a lights-and-siren run with the station's high-top Cadillac ambulance; it was midsummer, hot, we had a towering crave for a vanilla cone, so wheeled off the Salt Fork exit just north of Cambridge into a little ice cream stand we knew of.
I saw a little boy eyeballing that big shiny orange-and-white Caddy so I asked him if he'd like to see inside.
He grinned real big and nodded.
You know how guys are when a little boy likes what they're doing.
We give him the King's Tour, parked him behind the wheel and showed him which switches to push so he could see the lights reflected in the front of the ice cream shop; I stuffed towels in the twin siren speakers, then held him up where the lights were at eye level and Mikey ran the siren through yelp, wail and hi-lo, we put a stethoscope in his ears and let him listen to his heart, and then I looked over at his Mama and saw she had tears running down both cheeks.
She thanked us for paying attention to her little boy.
Turns out his father was a Columbus fire medic and the lad just admired the daylights out of his Daddy and that big shiny rig he drove, and the man was killed a month ago to the day.
The short hop back to station was solemn and in silence, but I'll never forget making a little boy's day.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Mikey and I were coming back to Cambridge from the Cleveland Clinic.
We'd just made a lights-and-siren run with the station's high-top Cadillac ambulance; it was midsummer, hot, we had a towering crave for a vanilla cone, so wheeled off the Salt Fork exit just north of Cambridge into a little ice cream stand we knew of.
I saw a little boy eyeballing that big shiny orange-and-white Caddy so I asked him if he'd like to see inside.
He grinned real big and nodded.
You know how guys are when a little boy likes what they're doing.
We give him the King's Tour, parked him behind the wheel and showed him which switches to push so he could see the lights reflected in the front of the ice cream shop; I stuffed towels in the twin siren speakers, then held him up where the lights were at eye level and Mikey ran the siren through yelp, wail and hi-lo, we put a stethoscope in his ears and let him listen to his heart, and then I looked over at his Mama and saw she had tears running down both cheeks.
She thanked us for paying attention to her little boy.
Turns out his father was a Columbus fire medic and the lad just admired the daylights out of his Daddy and that big shiny rig he drove, and the man was killed a month ago to the day.
The short hop back to station was solemn and in silence, but I'll never forget making a little boy's day.
The kindness of strangers can leave a lasting impression. Now when that little boy gets older, he will be inclined to "pay it forward" because he will remember the feeling you gave him.

Once, when I was very young, my parents took us to the boardwalk where there were many amusement rides. My parents were poor, and only had enough money to put me on one or two rides. I was very disappointed when my parents told me we were out of money for rides. A man who overheard the conversation, walked up to us and handed us a whole book of ride coupons. My parents tried to refuse but the man insisted. My sister and myself rode many rides the rest of the evening. As young as I was, 5 or 6, I always remember looking up at the man, and him handing the coupon book to my parents. That man, even today, inspires me.

I had to do some flea markets recently. When I saw a small child both behaving and wanting, I would give them the smaller items to take with them for free. Every time I do something like this, I think of that man, still. Last time, I gave a little girl a bucket full of wonderful seashells I collected in Florida.
 

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My grandson has a hero in every fireman and law officer. We see one and he has to say hello. He is 3. Every first responder he has talked too has always taken the time to say hello and a few minutes with him. Thanks to all of them.
 
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