Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I carry a glock 23. I recently bought a threaded lone wolf barrel for it, and I noticed an improvement in my groupings. being threaded, the barrel does stick out an additional .5" past the slide.

I am curious, is the improvement in accuracy due to the traditional rifling in the LWD barrel, or could it just be attributed to the additional length?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,909 Posts
I'm going to have to say I seriously doubt length could be a factor in accuracy, a longer sighting plane would make "it easier" for most to shoot more accurately which I also do not believe could be a factor here since the sight radius isn't changed at all- and even so it would be measured in inches not fraction of an inch IMO YMMV
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,438 Posts
The Lone Wolf barrels have tighter chambers than OEM Glocks, according to my local gunsmith. My shooting aprtner bought a Lone Wolf for his G35 and he had numerous failures to completely chamber a round until the chamber was reamed a snick deeper. The generous chamber dimensions of the Glock probably favors reliability over accuracy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
The Lone Wolf barrels have tighter chambers than OEM Glocks, according to my local gunsmith. My shooting aprtner bought a Lone Wolf for his G35 and he had numerous failures to completely chamber a round until the chamber was reamed a snick deeper. The generous chamber dimensions of the Glock probably favors reliability over accuracy

This... Tighter chamber are good for accuracy... Not reliability....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
313 Posts
Well, on the bright side, with polygonal rifled barrels, you cannot shoot lead, lest it clog up the barrel and "blow" it up.
With the aftermarket barrel, you should be able to handload your own super-accurate mixture of ammo. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36,813 Posts
Horse hockey.
 
  • Like
Reactions: StormRhydr

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,438 Posts
Well, on the bright side, with polygonal rifled barrels, you cannot shoot lead, lest it clog up the barrel and "blow" it up.
With the aftermarket barrel, you should be able to handload your own super-accurate mixture of ammo. Good luck.
The Glock prohibition against lead is, well, conservative. Yes, polygonal rifling will tend to pick up a little more lead if you shoot unjacketed bullets, but it's neither a death sentence nor a KB waiting to happen. If you have reasonable maintenance, lead bullets simply won't be an issue. Again, I offer my shooting buddy's G35 with 2+ years of lead bullets (in the range of 5000 rounds) shot with nothing more than an occasional swab of the bore as evidence of evil things not happening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,272 Posts
This... Tighter chamber are good for accuracy... Not reliability....
I have never contemplated accuracy vs. reliability until now. Reliability has always been my main concern. Guns and cars and homes - I'd pull my hair out if I had any left.

It's become painfully obvious that I need to move to smaller targets if I ever want any equilibrium back into my life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
With a polygonal barrel and lead rounds, you just have to clean the gun more often and thoroughly. H&K uses them too, and they do just fine with lead rounds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The Lone Wolf barrels have tighter chambers than OEM Glocks, according to my local gunsmith. My shooting aprtner bought a Lone Wolf for his G35 and he had numerous failures to completely chamber a round until the chamber was reamed a snick deeper. The generous chamber dimensions of the Glock probably favors reliability over accuracy
Thank you for the one answer that actually addresses my question. I will put a caliper on the chamber tomorrow and post my results. And by the way, the lone wolf barrel has performed on par with the glock OEM flawlessly for going on 500 rounds.

And for the record I did not buy this to shoot unjacketed rounds. That aspect is completely irrelevant to the topic I was trying to discuss, so can we please stop the pointless debate about it?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
18,105 Posts
Just so you know, I've put lots of Lone Wolf barrels on Glocks that were threaded for suppressors and not had any issues with any of them.
If you are loading subsonic ammo yourself, the biggest issue is to make sure that they do not exceed the recommended OAL.
Lead is OK to use IF you have a can that is user serviceable. If not, its best to stick to jacketed bullets.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,438 Posts
Thank you for the one answer that actually addresses my question. I will put a caliper on the chamber tomorrow and post my results. And by the way, the lone wolf barrel has performed on par with the glock OEM flawlessly for going on 500 rounds.

And for the record I did not buy this to shoot unjacketed rounds. That aspect is completely irrelevant to the topic I was trying to discuss, so can we please stop the pointless debate about it?
I don't think a dial caliper will suffice for chamber diameter; you really need a telescoping inside diameter gage or gage pins for that measurement. However, you can use your caliper to measure the depth of the chamber, which was an issue in my friend's LW barrel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Just so you know, I've put lots of Lone Wolf barrels on Glocks that were threaded for suppressors and not had any issues with any of them.
If you are loading subsonic ammo yourself, the biggest issue is to make sure that they do not exceed the recommended OAL.
Lead is OK to use IF you have a can that is user serviceable. If not, its best to stick to jacketed bullets.
I want to buy an Osprey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
I don't think a dial caliper will suffice for chamber diameter; you really need a telescoping inside diameter gage or gage pins for that measurement. However, you can use your caliper to measure the depth of the chamber, which was an issue in my friend's LW barrel.
I have a digital caliper, however, I am unclear to your point, are you saying the measurements need to go beyond three decimal places to be accurate? Because every dial caliper I have ever used goes to thousandths.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
19,438 Posts
I have a digital caliper, however, I am unclear to your point, are you saying the measurements need to go beyond three decimal places to be accurate? Because every dial caliper I have ever used goes to thousandths.
A digital or dial caliper's resolution goes to 0.001", but unless you spent at leastr a couple of hundred bucks on it, its accuracy is only about +/- 0.003", which is not sufficient to accurately measure a chamber diameter. Beyond that, the inside measurement 'blades' have square edges which won't sit flat on the ID walls of a pistol-caliber bore (but they'd be OK for a cannon bore). You'll get a number, to be sure, but it won't be terribly meaningful. Measuring inside diameters requires tools with spherical contact surfaces, or precision plug gages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
959 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I have a starret 799. It is +/- .001. Did you catch one of the few times I mentioned I was a welder/machinist for the past 15 years until I started school? Not trying to be snarky, just saying.

So what you are saying is the number is too precise to find with a caliper, and for any useful data I would need to put an inside micrometer on it (which is not in my garage tool box). I just assumed the I.D. blades would be sufficient, considering, even though they are "square" at the end, they will still give me a difference (if any) between the two. I mean after all, we are not after the exact diameter down to four or five decimal places here, just whether or not there is a variance.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top