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I gotta' ask. Wasn't this something best determined beFORE a pistol is purchased? Or did a pistol-plumber "over-tune" your PPQ? :blink:

BTW - it...happens. :biggrin2:
 

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I'd send it to Walther for a fix. That's just me. If that is the way it is, as designed, sell it and find yourself a new gun. Nothing good will come of homegrown fixes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I gotta' ask. Wasn't this something best determined beFORE a pistol is purchased? Or did a pistol-plumber "over-tune" your PPQ? :blink:

BTW - it...happens. :biggrin2:

I have not bought the pistol.

Any one who knows me knows I find out every detail about a product and agonize over its characteristics and options before I buy. Hence, I am considering this avenue and if it is possible.

I like everything about it except the sub 5 pound pull.

Previous to the purchase, people buy pistols (i.e. Glocks) with the intention of changing it, namely, making the pull lighter. I believe I would like a PPQ for several of it's specifications including it's smooth, "same pull weight every shot" (not true DA) trigger and short reset. I just want a bit heavier pull.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I would probably lean toward VP9 if it were a bit smaller (like the PPQ, Glock 19), especially if it's grip was a bit shorter.

I like the HK for its smooth trigger (for a carry-friendly polymer) that is still breaks well over 5 pounds (like my Glocks).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
. ...unless it comes from the home of Hamilton Bowen or Bill Laughridge. :biggrin2:
I won't do anything myself to a trigger on a carry gun. Reputable gunsmiths only. This is not only for the sake of quality, but also for the sake of creditability in the eyes of the public/ court of law.

I'm a little apprehensive to change a stock trigger on a carry gun, but I think I can defend it well in court (to a jury of people without a gun-user's perspective) if I can say I made it a bit "harder" (as in heavier) to pull. I suppose they typically only fault defendants that make their triggers "easier" (as in lighter) to pull.
 

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PPQ is listed at 5.6lbs. I don't think there is a MA compliant model? Neither is there a PPX. P99 is available with the MA horrible trigger. (and the PPS but that is a completely different category than you are shopping for.

I suppose they typically only fault defendants that make their triggers "easier" (as in lighter) to pull.
Actually, that has never been supported (in all of the "totally believable" Interweb history). There are cases of negligence in accidents where the trigger weight was brought into evidence, but not actual defensive shootings. In those cases, the defendant (victim) intended to pull the trigger.
***IANAL, but I went to bed with a law student in a Holiday Inn Express
 

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Discussion Starter #9
PPQ is listed at 5.6lbs. I don't think there is a MA compliant model? Neither is there a PPX. P99 is available with the MA horrible trigger. (and the PPS but that is a completely different category than you are shopping for.
Different reviews claim that the pull is anywhere from 4.6 - 5.4 pounds. Perhaps most or all of the reviews from magazine articles said it was 5+.

Joe Grine in a July 17, 2014, "The Truth About Guns" article said, ".... from a performance standpoint, Walther significantly improved upon the venerable GLOCK design. It’s a light, crisp trigger – the test sample measured right under 5 lbs – but it feels even lighter than that. "

The one that I dry-fired certainly was much easier to break than any other polymer gun with similar characteristics (i.e. Glock, HK, M&P etc.). Whether this was due to pull weight or simply the smoothness of the trigger, I still want to be able to briefly pause, with the slack taken out of the trigger, before the break. This will be more difficult with the PPQ.

I've read plenty of forum reviews of people who said they fired off some unintentional rounds at the range. I'm not sure if this was on the first shot or on unintentional follow-up shots. (I'm not concerned about unintentional "double-taps". The gun-safety rules will always be followed during unintentional double taps).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Actually, that has never been supported (in all of the "totally believable" Interweb history). There are cases of negligence in accidents where the trigger weight was brought into evidence, but not actual defensive shootings. In those cases, the defendant (victim) intended to pull the trigger.
***IANAL, but I went to bed with a law student in a Holiday Inn Express
There are so many reputable law/self-defense authorities that I respect that seem to be split on their opinions about whether trigger alterations affect court outcomes. Until most of them feel that alterations won't present a problem for "defense of self-defense" in court, or better yet, until I hear hard statistics from a legitimate study of such court cases, I think I'll err on the side of caution and not make my triggers easier to shoot (... even if it results in better accuracy).

(P.S. I love those commercials! They need to use you for more ideas.)
 

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There are so many reputable law/self-defense authorities that I respect that seem to be split on their opinions about whether trigger alterations affect court outcomes. Until most of them feel that alterations won't present a problem for "defense of self-defense" in court, or better yet, until I hear hard statistics from a legitimate study of such court cases, I think I'll err on the side of caution and not make my triggers easier to shoot (... even if it results in better accuracy).

(P.S. I love those commercials! They need to use you for more ideas.)
True, opinions are split. Ayoob started the process. Still, none can find a defensive shooting case where the victim was hung on a lightened trigger.
 

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Brother R&G, I admire your persnickety approach to handgun selection. Yet, respectfully, it's edging right up there on (IMHO) obsessive/compulsive. To pick a modern, sophisticated handgun design from the myriad of possible selections, then immediately begin to rethink the engineering and the legal aspects of a defensive shooting? Wow. :biggrin2:

To answer your question, yes. It's certainly doable. You might call Walther USA & talk with the top tech. He may be able to immediately help or refer you to a pistol smith who's well-versed in the PPQ. More "mainstream" guns and/or manufacturers would be easier to address. Ask this same question about a CZ, GLOCK or a 1911 variant and this thread would be...COVERED UP with diagrams, part numbers & clear instructions. :image035:
 
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Yet, respectfully, it's edging right up there on (IMHO) obsessive/compulsive.
You know me well, ghost tracker. We have crossed trails at some time.

It might be your head gear. :lolp: I like it.
 

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Still, one less point to be brought up in court.

Reloads would be another point.
 

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Well, if it's all about "less" points-in-court, then get a DAO S&W revolver & install very MANLY springs. Just keep increasing spring weights until your...forearm cramps-up. :biggrin2:
 

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If you are really paranoid and it should come up that you spent an inordinate amount of effort getting a "prosecution proof weapon" then that fact may be viewed with suspicion and be used against you in court. After all, you must have been planning on shooting someone if you put that much thought into having a court proofed gun :D
 
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