Defensive Carry banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I wear glasses for driving at night, at the movie theater and when I shoot. I've been practicing on the bowling pin range at a local club and Id like to sign up for the actual competitions. The only problem with regular glasses is they don't really cover peripheral vision and make it harder to sight in consecutive targets, which is really what BP shooting is all about. Cheap non script shooting glasses are even worse because the bend in the lenses just warps your peripheral. So, I'm wondering if prescription shooting glasses are worth it and if anyone has experience with them. My questions are price, effectiveness and where can I get them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,472 Posts
Talk to your optician. Make sure to explain where you need your focus at (front sight) and you may have to have someone measure the distance between your eye and the front sight when you are in your shooting stance. I was lucky enough to find an optician that would do that for me. For competition shooting they are by all means worth it. For defensive shooting your normal prescription or just safety glasses are best since you may not even have your glasses in a self defense situation.

Don't risk your eye sight by not getting safety rated lenses for shooting.

As a side note, good quality non prescription shooting glasses do not distort in the curved part of the lens. Your optician can help you there too.,
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bark'n

·
Banned
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Talk to your optician. Make sure to explain where you need your focus at (front sight) and you may have to have someone measure the distance between your eye and the front sight when you are in your shooting stance. I was lucky enough to find an optician that would do that for me. For competition shooting they are by all means worth it. For defensive shooting your normal prescription or just safety glasses are best since you may not even have your glasses in a self defense situation.

Don't risk your eye sight by not getting safety rated lenses for shooting.

As a side note, good quality non prescription shooting glasses do not distort in the curved part of the lens. Your optician can help you there too.,
Thanks, how much did they end up costing, if you don't mind me asking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,472 Posts
Thanks, how much did they end up costing, if you don't mind me asking?
I did some bartering with mine but I believe it was going to be in the $400 to $500 range depending on brand and the standard array of options.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I did some bartering with mine but I believe it was going to be in the $400 to $500 range depending on brand and the standard array of options.
That's what I thought. The hard part is not just buying a new gun with that money. Especially when first place is probably a free steak. I think it will be worth it though. I've gotten pretty good and feel ready to do some light competition
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,469 Posts
I think you can buy the side guards that slip over the arms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,472 Posts
That's what I thought. The hard part is not just buying a new gun with that money. Especially when first place is probably a free steak. I think it will be worth it though. I've gotten pretty good and feel ready to do some light competition
I just think of it as being cheaper than having to buy a seeing eye dog after a kaboom. $500 seems awful cheap when you consider the alternatives.

You'll get plenty of use out of them since you can wear them for plain old range days too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SayVandelay

·
Banned
Joined
·
401 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I think you can buy the side guards that slip over the arms.
Well I feel perfectly safe shooting in regular glasses. The concern is if I sign up for competition I won't have clear peripheral vision. A good high end pair of shooting glasses is the solution but for me that also means a prescription
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,108 Posts
You will love safety prescription glasses , i have had a pair for 3 years or so and wear them even when working in the yard ,shooting and most anything else that stuff is flying around. They also have the side sheilds on them . Cost is 350.00 to 450.00 depending on style of frames.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
376 Posts
I bought a pair of Ess glasses that allowed for the prescription insert to be mounted. It works well and was not crazy money
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
I'll tell you the best solution to this that I've found (for me.)

I wear progressive lens prescription glasses (seemless bifocal) so here's what I did:
I bought a set of glasses I wanted (EDC, if you will) and opted for the polycarbonate lenses (shatter proof) so they protect my eyes. (ANY glasses from an optomitrist will do for this.)
Then, I got two pair of Eyenavision Chemistrie clips for these glasses made at the time I bought the new glasses, so all 6 lenses were cut together. One pair of clips are mirrored orange shades (like Oakley Iridium lenses) and the other is solid yellow (shooting) clips.

Chemistrie clips are magnetic clip-on shades that are cut to the exact size of your glasses, and clip to small magnets that are mounted on the stem mounts or edge of the lens. They offer a ton of colors to choose from.
Here's a link:

Eyenavision Corporate - Gallery

hands down, the best solution, and coolest clip-ons I've ever found. Chemistrie has a FB page with a great image gallery, too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: elmacgyver0

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
What about Oakley glasses with clear lenses? I know you can prescription lenses for their frames. Get them with clear lenses in frames that fit your face.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
Been goin' to the same eye doc for 20 years, we have both have a lot of the same interests including shooting and fire arms. As we get older we both have problems focusing on the front sight of carbine length rifles. We both agree that long guns and handguns are easier to shoot.

His answer.........There is nothing wrong with our eyes, we are just getting old.
.
Thanks Doc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
+1 on Oakley. Their prescription lenses are fantastic--clear, non-warped vision across the entire curve of the lens, safety rated for shooting. Plus if you qualify for Oakley Standard Issue pricing they're really reasonable.

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
I have the same problem I went to tri focal lens. If you don't like the lines go to the progressive lens. And Warren Tactical Sights really helped me. The rear notch is larger than normal sights letting more light between the front sight post.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
As someone who has been shooting a few decades with my regular prescription glasses, including all kinds of competitive events, I do not see what prescription glasses bring to the table. To increase peripheral vision you will need to have bent glass. I do not see a way around that. In any event, I never found my regular glasses to be a hindrance. I was taught and still do shoot, look at next target by turning my head a little and shoot again. I do not see why you need peripheral vision for bowling pin shooting. I can see the whole table with my regular glasses so I do not understand why you cannot. What am I missing?

I would not waste money on shooting glasses. Just get regular glasses that are impact resistant. I do not know what prescription shooting glasses bring to the table. I have never damaged my prescription glasses in shooting a lot of shotgun, rifle and handgun competitions despite more than a few ejected cases hitting them. Just make sure that the lenses are not those tiny ones that I sometimes see people wearing. I am sitting at my desk about 5 feet in front a wall and I can see the whole length of the wall just looking straight forward. In fact I can see two walls that are perpendicular to each other. How much more peripheral vision do you need?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
Old Dog, the only reason I can see for shooting-specific glasses is if you want wrap-around lenses that fit snuggly to the face, like Oakleys do, to prevent things like ejected casings from falling between the lens and your face (believe it or not I've had that happen.. shooter next to me, every time she shot, her dang casing hit me in the face, and it was qualifying for my CCW so I couldn't just move.) Otherwise, I agree, I just use my regular glasses with polycarb lenses, and have magnetic clip-ons for shade and for contrast-yellow shooting just to add detail/contrast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,369 Posts
i usually just wear my everyday glasses when i practice since that's what i'll have on in a SD situation.

i do have inserts for my safety goggles, they have pretty large lenses and i don't notice warping at the corners.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,922 Posts
Having the eye doc set your vision to the distance to your front sight is important to maximize the usefulness of the things. But you don't have to spend a butt load of money.

I have the ESS ICE shooting glasses. (The sell them differently now. To buy go to ESS Eye Pro - Ballistic Goggles - Ballistic Sunglasses - Military Eyewear - Eye Protection – Shooting Glasses and find the ICE. Pick a lens, the kit with nose piece and temples, and an RX inset. Whole thing should cost about $60. Then take the insert to any glasses place and have them make your lenses for the insert. The above site does offer to make the corrective lenses now- at least vore the Vice insert- but I have never used it and don't know their cost. My eye does it for me pretty cheaply considering my complex Rx)
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top