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I have a good supply of small pistol magnum primers, but the .40 S&W, 38 Special, and the 9mm require small pistol regular primers. Is there any significant problem with using the magnum primers in these three calibers?
Thanks for the advice.
 

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The magnum primers are designed to burn a lot of slow burning powder fast it may cause too much pressure if you use them in non magnum calibers using faster burning powder.
 

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Just back off a couple of 10ths of a grain on the powder and try a couple. Look for excessive pressure signs and procede as indicated.

IMHO there is more difference in primer brands than there is between the standard and regular primers of the same manufacturer.
 

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Magnum primers are different from regular primers... This WILL cause the pressures to be different and possibly dangerous if you do not use the correct powders.

I would NOT advise using magnum primers in a non magnum application. Reloading can get you hurt. If you brave modifying formulas do so at your own risk.
 

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The general rule of thumb is to back off your powder charge by 10% with magnum primers. Then you can test that load to see if it can come up or down to give you an accurate load setting.

With the availability of loading supply's it's not uncommon for someone to buy magnum primers and use them in place of standard primers these days. But to be honest it's been done by reloaders for a long time now and the 10% rule works just fine.
Load at your own risk as always of course. ;)
 

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If you are a newbie at reloading I would not reccomend using magnum primers.

If you have done it for a while, then proceed with caution.

I would start with an 80 percent charge just to be safe. If that works, you have a good margin for error.
 

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Just remember if you go back too far you'll have to watch out for squibs if the charge is too weak.
 

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i am now using mag primers in my 40 reloads. i ran the standard and the mag primers loads through my chronograph. i used the same load for both. the mag primers gave me about 55 fps more in the 40 cal. now i don't load my range ammo hot so that is why i dropped the same load for both primers. i am going to work up some for the 38sp, 9mm and 45 next.
 

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At this point, you use what you can get. I ended up with some mag primers (all that I could find) so I started from scratch, loaded 10 rounds of 3 different powder weights based on the "reduced load" and went to test fire them. Found a good match and stuck with it.
 

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I load my range ammo on the light side and have never had any problems using magnum primers in any of my loads
 

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One of the few things I have never tried over the years is substituting small rifle primers for small pistol, except for an emergency batch of .357 mag.

Is there any difference, other than primer cup hardness? I didn't have a problem with the .357, but I was shooting them in a S&W M28.

I am curious about using them in a semi-auto.
 

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i use large primers (45acp). post obama i bought what i could find. 2k of cci mag primers, winchester primers and mag tec.

winchester advertises as reg/mag. i have used all three with my reloads. they all make it go bang. if you are concerned, don't use max loads. :gah:
 

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The rifle primers are MUCH harder and probably somewhat more powerful. You might be far better off to not do that !
But you don't know that for a fact? I'm not saying you're wrong, just asking for something more than an educated guess. I make enough of those myself. :wave:
 

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But you don't know that for a fact? I'm not saying you're wrong, just asking for something more than an educated guess. I make enough of those myself. :wave:
Yes rifle primers are more powerful and do have a thicker skin on the outside. Some pistols will not have enough oomf to even set off a rifle primer though, making reliability a factor.
 

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Rifle primers are constructed to ignite larger quantities of slower burning powder than pistol primers. This in turn generates MUCH higher pressures than what is the norm for pistols.

Yep, there are a few handgun rounds that can/do use rifle primers, but most are for use in T/C Contender and other specialized handguns.

That said, there are also some old black powder rounds that were designed for use in either handguns or rifles. These are mainly low pressure cartridges and most always call for the use of pistol primers unless loading strictly for use in a modern rifle.
 

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question; whats the difference between the remmington 5 1/2 and the 1 1/2 small pistol primers , will they both serve my needs 38's ,9mm ?
 

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I would drop my loads to the minimum, try them, and if they do OK go ahead and work up your loads.
I don't think you will have any problems if you stay below max loads, and instead toward the low or medium loads.

Regards,
Jerry
 

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question; whats the difference between the remmington 5 1/2 and the 1 1/2 small pistol primers , will they both serve my needs 38's ,9mm ?
5 1/2 is Small Pistol Magnum; 1 1/2 are regular.

For both .38 Special and 9mm, regular primers are the norm. If you must use magnum primers, back off the starting load 10 percent and work up from there.

Do not directly substitute magnums for regular in existing loads.
 
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