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I had this exact same equipment failure with a Zev trigger in my Glock awhile ago, which I posted about. Fortunately, I didn't experience the accidental discharge described here, but the failure was identical--the threaded screw holding the trigger safety bar in place worked its way out, causing the gun to hang up during holstering. Continued downward pressure causes the gun to fire:

Lessons from an accidental discharge ? Notes from KR
 

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I'm actually thinking about swapping the aftermarket trigger shoe in my G19 back to factory, or perhaps a G17 shoe/bar assembly for this reason. Not that I've had any issue with the aftermarket one that's in there at this point.

So, on the Zev, what's holding the trigger shoe to the trigger bar isn't a roll pin, it's an actual threaded screw?
 

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Not all aftermarket trigger are designed like that and even some factory triggers can have that same malfunction under the right conditions I believe. I think the point here is to inspect your equipment throughly on a regular basis.
 
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I'm actually thinking about swapping the aftermarket trigger shoe in my G19 back to factory, or perhaps a G17 shoe/bar assembly for this reason. Not that I've had any issue with the aftermarket one that's in there at this point.

So, on the Zev, what's holding the trigger shoe to the trigger bar isn't a roll pin, it's an actual threaded screw?
Yes, a threaded screw. It appears the Pyramid trigger discussed in the article is also similarly constructed.
 

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Not all aftermarket trigger are designed like that and even some factory triggers can have that same malfunction under the right conditions I believe. I think the point here is to inspect your equipment throughly on a regular basis.
The lesson to me is to stick with stock Glock trigger assemblies. I have untold thousands of rounds fired without ever experiencing similar with factory triggers, while experiencing a near catastrophic failure with an aftermarket trigger with about five hundred rounds on it.
 

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I have not modified my Glock pistols other than replacing the OEM sights, On the other hand the SW MP pistols I've had installed the APEX (Duty/Carry) kit installed by a S&W certified law enforcement armorer. I'll admit I've taken a look at the Apex designed triggers for the S&W MP series. Going back to Zev, I have absolutely no experience with their product but I've read online that there have been some glitches but not knowing the product I'm not qualified to render observations one way or the other.
 

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Geez, after the recent thread and those that came before it, I was just starting to believe that any time a gun fired without intentionally pulling the trigger they really were all considered ND's. Now this guy is saying there IS such a thing as an accidental discharge?

After seeing that screw backed out like it is, I have to disagree. Who the heck wouldn't notice that? I'm surprised the gun could even be holstered unless there was no definition in the molding around the trigger guard.

You should know the equipment you are operating. It wouldn't hurt for a little visual inspection once in a while. Same as us reloaders do before loading up a cracked case or putting a cartridge with the primer in backwards into the magazine.

I'm blaming this one on user error. Negligent.
 

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Geez, after the recent thread and those that came before it, I was just starting to believe that any time a gun fired without intentionally pulling the trigger they really were all considered ND's. Now this guy is saying there IS such a thing as an accidental discharge?

After seeing that screw backed out like it is, I have to disagree. Who the heck wouldn't notice that? I'm surprised the gun could even be holstered unless there was no definition in the molding around the trigger guard.

You should know the equipment you are operating. It wouldn't hurt for a little visual inspection once in a while. Same as us reloaders do before loading up a cracked case or putting a cartridge with the primer in backwards into the magazine.

I'm blaming this one on user error. Negligent.
The screw backed out to the left, away from the shooter's firing finger. It protruded far enough out to catch on the top inner side of the holster. When it happened to me, I was holstering slowly enough to notice the resistance and stop. Apparently, the shooter in the attached story did not. He pushed down into the holster, the screw depressed the trigger, and bang. Unless one visually inspects the trigger every time prior to holstering, there is no way to observe the failure.
 

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It's been stated many, many times, "Keep it stock!"
I've never considered mucking with the glocks, I have had 1911 triggers replaced with short instead of long triggers however.
 

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The lesson to me is to stick with stock Glock trigger assemblies. I have untold thousands of rounds fired without ever experiencing similar with factory triggers, while experiencing a near catastrophic failure with an aftermarket trigger with about five hundred rounds on it.
Maybe you should change your topic to "problem with glock aftermarket triggers" there are plenty of aftermarket triggers that this wouldn't happen to anymore than stock triggers.
 

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For an SD pistol, I would be hard pressed to consider a non-stock trigger. If the stock trigger is so bad as to warrant replacement with something aftermarket, you need to ask yourself why you bought it in the first place when ther are some great stock triggers out there.

I just bought a Sig p320 and was toying with the idea of a Bruce Grey trigger after the first outing. After 500 rounds, I am shooting it well enough to put that thought on the back burner
 

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I have modified all of the trigger assemblies on my primary carry guns. For the Glocks all of the parts, save the trigger springs, are Glock parts. For my M&P's, the parts are from Apex Tactical. I have never had any problems of any kind with any of these components.
 

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I don't understand why somebody would buy a piece of equipment that's world-renowned for its reliability, from a maker world-renowned for manufacturing repeatability - probably paying a premium over other brands that are also of extremely high quality - and then replace a component critical to function and safety with a drop-in assembly designed by who knows what engineer, built in who knows what factory and held to who knows what QA standards.
 

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For an SD pistol, I would be hard pressed to consider a non-stock trigger. If the stock trigger is so bad as to warrant replacement with something aftermarket, you need to ask yourself why you bought it in the first place when ther are some great stock triggers out there.

I just bought a Sig p320 and was toying with the idea of a Bruce Grey trigger after the first outing. After 500 rounds, I am shooting it well enough to put that thought on the back burner
More often than not, it isn't because the OEM trigger is necessarily bad but rather not in line with what the buyer desires. At least that is how I view this. I want all of my primary carry guns to have triggers that closely approximate one another.. as much as I can get them to do this. I don't want a primary modified Glock with a measured five pound two ounce trigger and a brand new M&P 9c with a measured nine pound five ounce trigger. I want those two triggers to be within around three or four ounces of each other and to break much the same as each other.

Incidentally, the above example of those two guns are from personal experience and those measure pull weights is what they actually had when compared.
 
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Other than frame mods to make it fit me and sights I put in a Lone wolf 3.5# connector and did the $.25 trigger job. That gives me a very consistent 4.5# trigger. I use the factor springs and trigger. My Glock 31C runs like a champ with 357 Sig, 40 S&W and 9mm and fits my hand like a glove doing it.
 

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The screw backed out to the left, away from the shooter's firing finger. It protruded far enough out to catch on the top inner side of the holster. When it happened to me, I was holstering slowly enough to notice the resistance and stop. Apparently, the shooter in the attached story did not. He pushed down into the holster, the screw depressed the trigger, and bang. Unless one visually inspects the trigger every time prior to holstering, there is no way to observe the failure.
Didn't they use lock-tight?
 
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