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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my new BCM upper today and qas quite excited until I put it on my lower and began to hand cycle some rounds through it. I tried 4 different kinds of ammo. Of the 4, 2 would not cycle. 1 was reload and the other was American eagle. It would chamber the round the bolt would get stuck forward. I couldn't pull the charging handle back by hand. I had to put the edge of the charging handle over a table and tap the rifle down to create enough force to get to it extract the rounds. Here's the strange thing... I broke out my micrometer and the length of the rounds that would not cycle were the same as the ones that would. Anyone have any idea what may be going on?


This is a new record for a gun getting Rollo'd... It hasn't even been fired yet :(
 

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Rollo, Rollo, Rollo. What to say?

I suggest if I may, that hand cycling is not a good indicator of actually performance.

And when one gets stuck, with the weapon on safe, slam the but against the ground while at the same time pulling back on the charging handle.
 

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You'll be fine. Shoot it. Hand cycling is the cause of many sleepless nights for absolutely zero reason.

In addition to what Glockman said, be sure to collapse the stock fully or it can break the latch. A local idiot got his finger caught that way and posted it on YouTube under "CTR Fail", though it should have been "Moron breaks CTR".

Put 100 rounds through it and see what happens. Anodizing and parkerizing needs worn down, parts need to set a bit, edges need deburred, etc.

Edit Glockman, when are y'all coming down this way?
 
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As Gm an and Jon said, try it on a range and see if it functions with live ammo.

IF not, then you should worry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok guys, thanks for the info. I will stop freaking out until I get some rounds through it.
 

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Awwwwww, MAN!!!

You broke it ALREADY???
 
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You'll be fine. Shoot it. Hand cycling is the cause of many sleepless nights for absolutely zero reason.

In addition to what Glockman said, be sure to collapse the stock fully or it can break the latch. A local idiot got his finger caught that way and posted it on YouTube under "CTR Fail", though it should have been "Moron breaks CTR".

Put 100 rounds through it and see what happens. Anodizing and parkerizing needs worn down, parts need to set a bit, edges need deburred, etc.

Edit Glockman, when are y'all coming down this way?
Will be leaving here next Friday. Hope to see you on Monday or Tuesday. It will only be an hours drive from where we will be to CC.
 

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Just a note... There's nothing gentle about manipulating an AR. Lock the bolt to the rear, insert a mag and press the bolt release. When you remove the mag and there's still a round in the chamber, pull the charging handle HARD to the rear. It'll stop when it needs to. Then, don't follow the charging handle, pull back more and let your hand slip off, it'll go forward on its own.

Don't ever let the charging handle forward slowly. Pull back off and let it slam home. Live or dry, doesn't matter. When doing this, pinch the left side of the charging handle with your left hand. Index finger on the latch and thumb on the back. Pull back hard. Keep your firing hand on the grip. The only time you'll ever take it off for weapons manipulation is when you need to lock the bolt to the rear. Then you use your left hand around the front of the magwell with your thumb on the bottom of the bolt release. Then your firing hand will pull the charging handle hard to the rear to lock it back.

If the round is suck in the chamber, pull harder. If that doesn't work, collapse the stock and slam it on the ground with your hand on the charging handle attempting to pull back. If that doesn't work, use your foot on the charging handle or stomp it. Had to do it twice with a DPMS about 8 years ago.

Hand cycling will give you nightmares. Don't do it!
 
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Will be leaving here next Friday. Hope to see you on Monday or Tuesday. It will only be an hours drive from where we will be to CC.
Sounds good brother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just a note... There's nothing gentle about manipulating an AR. Lock the bolt to the rear, insert a mag and press the bolt release. When you remove the mag and there's still a round in the chamber, pull the charging handle HARD to the rear. It'll stop when it needs to. Then, don't follow the charging handle, pull back more and let your hand slip off, it'll go forward on its own.

Don't ever let the charging handle forward slowly. Pull back off and let it slam home. Live or dry, doesn't matter. When doing this, pinch the left side of the charging handle with your left hand. Index finger on the latch and thumb on the back. Pull back hard. Keep your firing hand on the grip. The only time you'll ever take it off for weapons manipulation is when you need to lock the bolt to the rear. Then you use your left hand around the front of the magwell with your thumb on the bottom of the bolt release. Then your firing hand will pull the charging handle hard to the rear to lock it back.

If the round is suck in the chamber, pull harder. If that doesn't work, collapse the stock and slam it on the ground with your hand on the charging handle attempting to pull back. If that doesn't work, use your foot on the charging handle or stomp it. Had to do it twice with a DPMS about 8 years ago.

Hand cycling will give you nightmares. Don't do it!
The round stuck in the chamber is the issue that I am encountering. It's happening with all of my reloads and one other name brand type of ammo. I'll put it away and stop hand cycling until I get a chance to put some rounds through it.
 

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Have you cleaned the chamber yet? Not the barrel, but the carrier group and chamber?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Have you cleaned the chamber yet? Not the barrel, but the carrier group and chamber?
Ug... I am embarrassed to admit it but I didn't... The thing came covered in lube so I didn't really think about it. Ill go clean it now.
 

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The round stuck in the chamber is the issue that I am encountering. It's happening with all of my reloads and one other name brand type of ammo. I'll put it away and stop hand cycling until I get a chance to put some rounds through it.
Rollo, are you crimping the hand loads? If you are don't when using in an AR chamber.
Also, make sure the round is seated to the minimum OAL.
Barnes bullets are bad for this because of the longer bearing surface necessary to make weight.
 

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Ug... I am embarrassed to admit it but I didn't... The thing came covered in lube so I didn't really think about it. Ill go clean it now.
Clean it now then try again. Still might do it though. I don't know if hand loads would be what I'd use to assure proper function.
 

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When I run an AR, I handle it rough. I slam the mags hard to make sure they are fully seated and that sometimes releases the bolt. When it doesn't, I smack the crap out of the bolt release. Don't baby it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Rollo, are you crimping the hand loads? If you are don't when using in an AR chamber.
Also, make sure the round is seated to the minimum OAL.
Barnes bullets are bad for this because of the longer bearing surface necessary to make weight.
These were loaded on my buddies Dillon 650 which I would guess (not totally sure) does have a factory crimp die.
 

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These were loaded on my buddies Dillon 650 which I would guess (not totally sure) does have a factory crimp die.
Yeah, that crimp can allow too much of the neck to get into the bore, which will stick them if its a little too much. They will wedge in their tight. I have never needed to crimp a bullet for a rifle unless it was a pistol caliber or, a lever gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Clean it now then try again. Still might do it though. I don't know if hand loads would be what I'd use to assure proper function.
I have it a cleaning and it is still doing it. I understand that function testing with hand loads probably isn't ideal but that's mostly what I shoot so I want to make sure the gun functions with them. I also tried American Eagle and had the same issue but not quite to the extent of the hand loads. Honestly, I want the gun to function with pretty much anything short of crayons shoved in the chamber. My el cheapo model 1 sales upper would seriously function with anything. It didn't care about ammo or the mag it was fed from. I expect the same from the signifiacntly higher end upper. This will be my one and only rifle. Plinker, SHTF, survival, etc rifle. It needs to run with everything. Don't get me wrong. Seeing as how I haven't even fired a live round though this gun yet I am in NO WAY SHAPE OR FORM condemning it. I was just a little surprised. Its making me wonder if perhaps maybe the lower toleranceS on lower end hardware can actually be beneficial when it comes to hardware. Kind of like AK's (One of which I just sold to be able to afford this upper lol)
 

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There is a 1'2 moon indentation on the front of the BCG for a reason,take a small screwdriver and stick in between the 1/2 moon indent and the front of the ejection port and pry the BCG back,I've had some steel case ammo get stuck and flipped out my knife and pried back the BCG,

Are you reloading with small base dies?I had problems from 2 things causing stuck cases,I started micing my case OAL and sorting according to length by 10/1000 deviation as long as they were under max OAL,if you are reloading different lengths of brass the longer brass when you run thru the crimp die can actually bulge the shoulder causing the BCG to not fully close,or cause the rounds to stick,I use RCBS small base 223 dies and just use the seat/crimp die to seat the bullet and a lee factory crimp die to crimp,over trial and error I now reload ammo that feeds and clears without any hiccups
 
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