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I know some states require the individual to present his permit to LEO when he or she is pulled over. What about if you are the passenger? I am sure this varies state to state and placing myself in the LEO's shoes I would like to know what I am dealing with. So Should you or shouldn't you....depending on state laws.

PS....I know in my state of Montana there are NO restrictions of carrying in a vehicle.
 

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Until the cop addresses you, specifically, in an official capacity, I would think you just stay quiet.

Just be sure you're keeping your hands out in a visible, non-threatening position all the time the driver is interacting with the cop.

IANAL and did not stay recently at a Holiday Inn Express
 
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When an officer approaches a vehicle he is approaching all occupants of a vehicle. The officer could be stopping the vehicle for a traffic violation or a DUI check but they also may have seen a passenger that fits the description of someone they are looking for or they may be looking for a group of people in a similar vehicle.

A simple test to verify would be for a passenger to get out during a stop and try to walk away without being told they could leave.
 
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Interesting answer from a fellow resident. I was actually wondering this as well as NC requires CCers to notify the officers when 'approached.' I too was unsure how that worked out when you were a bystander/passenger in a vehicle.

If the officer never says a word to you, how do you bring it up? I don't want to be the one yelling across the car, "'ey officer! Just wanted to let you know I'm carrying concealed!" Sounds like a TMI moment, especially since he hasn't said a word to you.
 

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Interesting answer from a fellow resident. I was actually wondering this as well as NC requires CCers to notify the officers when 'approached.' I too was unsure how that worked out when you were a bystander/passenger in a vehicle.

If the officer never says a word to you, how do you bring it up? I don't want to be the one yelling across the car, "'ey officer! Just wanted to let you know I'm carrying concealed!" Sounds like a TMI moment, especially since he hasn't said a word to you.
You can either tell the driver they need to immediately inform the officer that a passenger has a carry permit and is currently carrying or you can politely inform the officer as he starts the interaction with the driver of that info. I'd also recommend that you place your hands on the dash or if you're in the back seat, the headrest in front of you until your told to do other wise.


I agree it may be a bit uncomfortable as a passenger but consider how much more uncomfortable it will be to be when you don't notify in a timely manor as required and the officer escalates the interaction with you being the full focus of his interest.

As for NC I have verified with an associate attorney with the AGs office that all passengers are considered being approached when a vehicle is stopped so in order to stay within NC law you must notify even as a passenger.
 
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Sideline question... Are you informing the officer that you have a permit, or are you informing them that you're carrying?...

Let's say you have your permit, you're in a state that requires notifying the officer, you're pulled over, but you happen to not be carrying nor do you have a weapon inside the vehicle at that time. (For instance you're on your way somewhere that you're not allowed to carry so you have your weapon in a lockbox in the trunk already.)
 

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It's amazing to me how much you can impress a cop with quiet, respectful, cooperative and polite information.

Two quick tales: I have several deputy friends, and no duty to inform -- State of Florida makes no provision to inform. But there have been an onerous amount of cop shootings in Florida in the past two years. So all of my buddies say simply, they really appreciate it when someone tells them they have a weapon because it makes a world of difference to their perceived threat level. They relax, they treat you differently, you get treated more nicely, everyone gets along fine.

Second: I ran a red light one day, and a cop was sitting right there in the lane next to me, stopped behind another car for the light. The light was at an intersection crossing a five lane road, I was on the five lane, and the intersection was being crossed by kids changing classes at the high school located right at this intersection -- some kids had to go back and forth across this five lane road to change classes and this happened right at class change time. The cop immediately followed me, and I told -- almost word for word, just like this: "I was approaching the intersection, I was watching for kids and took my eye off the light for a second watching for kids, and when I looked back up realized I was too late to stop and I just blew the light." In one simple sentence said I did it, I was wrong, and here's what happened. This was after I handed him license, registration, insurance card and told him I was armed.

The deputy let me off without even a warning ticket.
 

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Sideline question... Are you informing the officer that you have a permit, or are you informing them that you're carrying?...

Let's say you have your permit, you're in a state that requires notifying the officer, you're pulled over, but you happen to not be carrying nor do you have a weapon inside the vehicle at that time. (For instance you're on your way somewhere that you're not allowed to carry so you have your weapon in a lockbox in the trunk already.)
I'm not aware of any state that requires you to notify the possession of a permit if your not actually armed. That would make as much sense as notifying you have a drivers license, while your walking down the street.
 

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Yep... grey area...

Concealed Handguns Reciprocity

To possess a concealed handgun in North Carolina, you must:

Carry your permit and a valid form of identification with you at all times.

Disclose the fact that you have a valid concealed handgun permit when you are approached or addressed by any law enforcement officer in North Carolina.

Inform the officer that you are in possession of a concealed handgun.

Present both the permit and valid identification at the request of an officer
NOTE: You should not attempt to display either your weapon or your permit unless directed to by an officer.

=====
Since the two items about informing of having a permit and informing about being in possession are two separate line items and don't say "and" in between... Technically, not being an attorney, sounds to me like you have to inform that you have a permit.
 

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In Wisconsin there is no duty to inform. If I was a passenger in a car that was stopped, I would say nothing unless the officer addressed me. Then I would tell them I had a ccp and I was armed. I would ask for instructions and do what was requested.
 

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In PA we are not required to notify. So as a passenger during a typical traffic stop I would just sit quietly and shut up.

BUT, as a passenger if I am armed (and I always am) and I am asked to exit the vehicle for any reason during a stop absolutely I will inform the officer that I am carrying.

During that particular citizen/LEO interaction/encounter I want to avoid any and all possible unhappy surprises both for the officer and myself.
 

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Answering this question should first state that you should be familiar with the law in your state BEFORE you start CC--it is as important as the test you took for your CCWP and should have as much importance as any and all the practice you take for proficiency with your firearm. There should be very little reason to have to ask a question like this. The state law will define must inform. If it only says driver, it means the driver; if the LEO's questions are also directed to the occupants, they "must inform", as well.


Not sure where the Holiday Inn Express business started in this thread, but my last visit to Greenville, SC included a stay at a Holiday Inn Express that was a good as I could possibly want. Ya want total glitz and glamour fine--stay at a Ritz or a Hyatt. Ya want perfection for a room and a decent breakfast at $100 for 2 nights in a suite (w/coupon)---stay in this Holiday Inn Express. Look my review up in Travel Advisor.
 

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Not sure where the Holiday Inn Express business started in this thread, but my last visit to Greenville, SC included a stay at a Holiday Inn Express that was a good as I could possibly want. Ya want total glitz and glamour fine--stay at a Ritz or a Hyatt. Ya want perfection for a room and a decent breakfast at $100 for 2 nights in a suite (w/coupon)---stay in this Holiday Inn Express. Look my review up in Travel Advisor.
And the cinnamon rolls are to die for...
 

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Yep... grey area...

Concealed Handguns Reciprocity

To possess a concealed handgun in North Carolina, you must:

Carry your permit and a valid form of identification with you at all times.

Disclose the fact that you have a valid concealed handgun permit when you are approached or addressed by any law enforcement officer in North Carolina.

Inform the officer that you are in possession of a concealed handgun.

Present both the permit and valid identification at the request of an officer
NOTE: You should not attempt to display either your weapon or your permit unless directed to by an officer.

=====
Since the two items about informing of having a permit and informing about being in possession are two separate line items and don't say "and" in between... Technically, not being an attorney, sounds to me like you have to inform that you have a permit.
Sorry about sidelining the thread a bit but to clarify for NC law.

There is NO gray area as to if you have to inform if not carrying. Iguanadon, what you quoted is from a "interpretation" of the statutes relating to concealed carry by the AGs office. It's NOT statute law and not to be taken as such. It's meant to give just a basic rule of thumb in regards to firearms and concealed carry.

NC statute 14-415.11 clearly states that
The person shall carry the permit together with valid identification whenever the person is carrying a concealed handgun, shall disclose to any law enforcement officer that the person holds a valid permit and is carrying a concealed handgun when approached or addressed by the officer, and shall display both the permit and the proper identification upon the request of a law enforcement officer.
(highlighting is mine)

Don't take this as ragging on you, I just want to make sure that the "Tarheels" out there and any out of state visitors understand that they do NOT have to notify when you are not in possession of a concealed handgun.

Now, all that being said, there is no statute against notifying when you are not armed. Some people feel that it makes the LEO more "at ease" if they happen to run your license and discover that you have a concealed handgun permit so if you fall into that category of people feel free to notify when your not armed, just don't take it personally if the LEO chuckles a bit when you do.
 

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Arkansas laws says its only required if the officer addresses you and asks for identification. I would not and do not bring it up before that time. If I get stopped and the cop says hey you were speeding slow down and have a nice day I will not interrupt him to say oh by the way .....
Also I read a good post somewhere the other day by a LEO that says always call your weapon a firearm or sidearm never call it a gun. If a cops partner only hears "I have a GUN" bad things can happen.

per Handgunlaw.us
(b) In any official contact with law enforcement, if the licensee IS in possession of a handgun, when the
officer asks the licensee for identification (driver’s license, or personal information, such as name and date of
birth), the licensee shall notify the officer that he or she holds a concealed handgun carry license and that he
or she has a handgun in his or her possession.
 
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