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Although I still consider myself very fit and reasonably sharp for my age, I have begun to realize that I am beginning to get a bit forgetful at times, which started me thinking about the guns I own and carry.

I carry a Smith & Wesson snub nose Model 642 in a pocket holster a lot of the times during the summer months here in Florida, and also a kimber Ultra Carry in an OWB holster.

I also own and shoot a number of other semi-automatics.

I have been handling and shooting guns long enough now so that I feel that the safety rules are now part of my muscle memory, but I started thinking that perhaps in the not too distant future it might be time to give up my semi-automatics and use only revolvers.

The reasaon, of course, would be that there is less chance of messing up and causing a negligent discharge with a revolver.

I would not havethe same number of rounds in my EDC, but with my Ultra Carry I only have 8, and I believe that there are revolvers on the market that hold 7 rounds.

Not intending to do this now, or any time real soon, but am interested in what you all think.

And comments from the younger members will also be most welcome.

Thanks.
 

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How is a revolver somehow less prone to an ND than an autoloader?

I'm confused.........of course, I am an "older member", so that may be part of it! :hand5:
 

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How is a revolver somehow less prone to an ND than an autoloader?

I'm confused.........of course, I am an "older member", so that may be part of it! :hand5:
I see where he's coming from: Less manual manipulation, visible action/chambers with revolver.

I'm only 38, but I get it. If/when an auto makes you second guess yourself, and a revolver does not, go with what quiets the what if's in your head.

I personally like revolvers, and don't feel disadvantaged with one most of the time.
 

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If you get to the point where you cannot handle a firearm safely.....then by all means do not handle them. Not trying to be funny here. If your worried about memory failure or something like that, it's no time to be wondering if the gun is loaded or not.....

Buy a cane................................
 

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I qualify as an older member and am glad I made it. I think my thought process is better for firearms safety than it used to be. I am not multitasking as much any more and am able to concentrate on one task. I also have time to put in place good muscle memory. I am going to stick with pistols because I think the recoil is more manageable for me. Alzheimer disease runs in my family, so I take actions to keep the old brain well supplied with good nutrients, low blood pressure, low blood sugar, low cholesterol, and thin runny blood. With the availability of inexpensive meters and mail order tests, a person can learn what the cause-effect relationships are for many behaviors. So far it is working great for me. I qualify as an older member and am glad I made it. I think my thought process...:confused:
 

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Although I still consider myself very fit and reasonably sharp for my age, I have begun to realize that I am beginning to get a bit forgetful at times, which started me thinking about the guns I own and carry.

I carry a Smith & Wesson snub nose Model 642 in a pocket holster a lot of the times during the summer months here in Florida, and also a kimber Ultra Carry in an OWB holster.

I also own and shoot a number of other semi-automatics.

I have been handling and shooting guns long enough now so that I feel that the safety rules are now part of my muscle memory, but I started thinking that perhaps in the not too distant future it might be time to give up my semi-automatics and use only revolvers.

The reasaon, of course, would be that there is less chance of messing up and causing a negligent discharge with a revolver.

I would not havethe same number of rounds in my EDC, but with my Ultra Carry I only have 8, and I believe that there are revolvers on the market that hold 7 rounds.

Not intending to do this now, or any time real soon, but am interested in what you all think.

And comments from the younger members will also be most welcome.

Thanks.
Ron;
FWIW, I think your mental abilities are just fine but if you want I will tell you when I think they are going.
I'll just have to figure out a way to remember to tell you.:wink::haha:
Do I count as a "younger" member??:danceban:
 

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I am definitely an older dude, but so far feel very fortunate that I don't have any cause to mistrust my firearms handling or my ability to think and plan.

I have a feeling that perhaps you don't either. The folks who are likely to have a problem, aren't self-aware enough to ask the question.

Anyway, ALWAYS, go with what you believe to be the safest approach. If you don't trust yourself with a semi-auto, then by all means go with the 642 or another revolver.

FWIW, and I know people's abilities vary greatly even within roughly the same age category, "forgetfulness" is very often nothing more than being distracted. When the same mistake is made by a kid they just brush it off as one of those things. When we do it, our kids go--"oh, dad's losing it."
 

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If you treat every gun as if it were loaded then you won't have a problem,if you start handling any gun irresponsibly ,it doesn't matter if its a autoloader or revolver you need to put them up IMHO
 

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I don't understand? Why would a revolver be different than a DAO pistol?
I have noticed I've been saying "I don't understand" alot lately.
 

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I don't understand? Why would a revolver be different than a DAO pistol?
I have noticed I've been saying "I don't understand" alot lately.
Just because you can tell at a glance if a revolver is loaded. No question about mags/chamber/safety

Some DAK's also have additional safeties to deal with as well.
 

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Revolvers probably less complex

I see your point about revolvers being less likely to be involved in negligent discharge than semiautos. I own and carry both types, myself.

A revolver's loaded/unloaded status can usually be seen by looking at the cylinder from the side and noting if cartridges are present. A semiauto's status is usually not evident without pulling back the slide or removing the magazine, which takes more effort.

Most revolvers have a heavier trigger pull (unless manually cocked) in the 10 pound range. Many semiautos, like Glocks and Kahrs, have a first trigger pull of 5 or 6 pounds. Semiautos can also have safeties and decockers to add complexity, which revolvers do not have.

So I'd agree that if you are careless or don't follow the standard rules, you can probably get into trouble more quickly with a semiauto than a revolver.

I also like a 642 in a pocket holster, by the way. It is so darned simple and concealable.
 

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I'm 60 and have myself wondered about the same thing. I consider every firearm loaded so that's a non issue. Recently I've been carrying my outdoor semiauto hammer down on a loaded chamber. Before y'all get excited I said outdoor. I can lower the hammer in a safe manner even if it goes off in process (been doing it for fourty some odd years without a problem). I consider going single action superior to going from fifteen rounds to six.
 

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Just because you can tell at a glance if a revolver is loaded. No question about mags/chamber/safety

Some DAK's also have additional safeties to deal with as well.
One should presume that ANY gun is loaded until it has been proven that it isn't.

"Glancing" at a revolver doesn't cut it; opening the cylinder and actually looking at the empty charge holes does.

I'm 66 and have been shooting for 40+ years and I have never had an "empty" gun discharge. If someone is so forgetful that can't check every single time they pick up a gun, then they should forego handling them at all.
 

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A revolver's loaded/unloaded status can usually be seen by looking at the cylinder from the side and noting if cartridges are present.
Bad way to check, especially considering that some revolvers' cylinders have a recessed rear face and the cartridge rims cannot be clearly seen.

Opening the cylinder and looking at the charge holes is the only reliable way to verify the gun is unloaded.
 

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FWIW:

I'm 66, almost 67. I share the same concern as you about the complexity of maintaining absolute safety (if there is such a thing) regarding my firearms as I age.

I've been a gun owner for over 50 years, been cc legally since 1966. I was raised up on revolvers, da of course until you cocked the suckers, and while I was not trained to keep my finger off the trigger, as is common w/younger folks, I WAS trained to never apply pressure to the trigger until I actually wanted to shoot something.

So, finger in triggerguard is normal for me, and one reason that gives me no grief, or unusual concern for an ad/nd is because all of my pistols are deliberately TDA (generally in 9MM). The heavier first round DA trigger pull is what I was weaned on, and I feel absolutely comfortable with a pistol or revolver that is a tda whether it be in my home defense choice, or my cc weapon.

I'm of the opinion that a person who overcomes a heavy double-action trigger, accidently, is too stupid to be allowed access to a loaded weapon.

In years past I tried the Glock 26, but just never got comfortable with it's trigger... Scary for me, and I know that's MY weakness, not necessarily a problem with a very popular line of pistols.

I also tried the Walther PPS, which has a similar trigger action to the Glock, and didn't like it either. I sold both.

My only divergence from the TDA I love is I have a couple of HK P7's which are SA "squeezecockers". The HK P7 series of pistols are reputed to be the "safest" of all, and while I like my P7's (they are awesomely accurate) I don't particularly enjoy cc them.

I actually have two preferred carry choices now.

I carry my LWS380 daily.. It goes in my back pocket in a wallet holster everytime my wallet goes in the other.. The little mousegun is DAO and I feel perfectly safe with it for cc, and it's so tiny I can almost forget it's back there.

When I want to carry a larger caliber pistol, in addition to my Seecamp it's a 9MM HK P2000sk in V3 variation. (TDA). I've found the P2000sk to be, surprisingly, equal in accuracy to my P7's, it IS TDA, with exposed hammer, and I really like it.

I still have 5 snubby's (2 J-frames/3 Colt D-frames), and I often use one of them for my "vehicle gun" choice... I know the lowly 38 special revolver gets little to no respect in this modern age of plastic, but I still love 'em, and new self defense rounds are being introduced on a regular basis which offer more "oomph" than before.

I believe that as a person ages it is obvious that most will lose a lot of the skills and abilities they had when they were walking in a younger body, but that's just the way it works, and you might as well prepare for it.

When I get to the point I feel I cannot be safe around firearms I'll get rid of the suckers, but I do believe that making a choice of having traditional double-action weapons will extend the time I have BEFORE I have to face the facts and give 'em up.

Old folks don't want to give up lots of things, drivers licenses and guns among them, but sooner or later it will come. Being smart enough to realize when that time is approaching is a blessing.

So, not knocking the choices of persons who disagree with me about TDA firearms for old folks, but it's what works for this old senior citizen, and I don't worry about shooting myself in the butt when cc, nor having an ad/nd because of a first round extremely light trigger/striker pull.. :gah::gah:

Just personal opinion, no offense to those who might disagree.

Thanks,

Jesse
 

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One should presume that ANY gun is loaded until it has been proven that it isn't.

"Glancing" at a revolver doesn't cut it; opening the cylinder and actually looking at the empty charge holes does.

I'm 66 and have been shooting for 40+ years and I have never had an "empty" gun discharge. If someone is so forgetful that can't check every single time they pick up a gun, then they should forego handling them at all.
Of course you are correct. I was just making a general statement to show a comparison.
 

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Since I'm only 58 I don't know if I qulify as an "older" member.

Darn, now I forgot what the question was! :rofl:

I don't really see a problem with carrying a semi, regardless of age, as long as you can operate it. I carry a decocker model so I stand no more of a chance with it than a revolver. If I thumb back the hammer I have a single action trigger pull just like a double action revolver would, or if I fire it double action I have the same heavier trigger pull like a revolver.

If the day comes when I can't safely operate it, as much as I would hate to, I'd lock my guns away.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
How is a revolver somehow less prone to an ND than an autoloader?

I'm confused.........of course, I am an "older member", so that may be part of it! :hand5:
Well, no intent to start that debate, but the manual of arms is simpler. Easier to know if the gun is loaded, and the long, hard D/A pull, IMO, makes it less likely that I will screw up.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you get to the point where you cannot handle a firearm safely.....then by all means do not handle them. Not trying to be funny here. If your worried about memory failure or something like that, it's no time to be wondering if the gun is loaded or not.....

Buy a cane................................
I agree, but that is not the point of my post. No question that, as with driving, if you feel that you can't do it safely then you should stop.

But, for example, one may decide to stop driving at night, but still be perfectly competent to continue to drive during the day.
 

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I don't know about the mental aspect of this, as I am only 50, but it seems that as we get older we will lose some fine motor skills. Handling a DA revolver may be a safer alternative, to remembering to swipe off a safety, clear a chamber, etc...
 
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