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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Confidence - reliability: will it feed, eject and go bang every time?
Control - can you handle it comfortably and fire it accurately?
Concealability - can you hide it well, even in summer clothes?
Comfort - will your holster be comfy sitting, bending, driving?
Caliber - obviously bigger is better
Capacity - obviously more is better
Cost - both initial cost and the cost to practice

Recognizing EVERYTHING involves a trade-off, i.e. that a larger gun has more capacity and better control but is less concealable and less comfortable. One that costs less may be less reliable. Bigger caliber means less capacity.

This (above) is how I would order these factors, but I'm a newbie and am curious to know if those more experienced would have different priorities or add additional factors...

Fred
 

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For me it's really just three Cs for CC.

Comfort, caliber and how easy it is to conceal, pretty much in that order.

GBK
 

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there is nothing obvious about caliber "the bigger the better"...a smaller caliber gun may be easier to control therefore more likely to hit its target multiple times in a short period if necessary...the statement that larger calibers have more capacity and better control is not necessarily a true statement...it can be confusing enough in here and this post will probably start an interesting and old battle...but htere are too many variables involved to make a generalized statement like that...

capacity...smaller calibers generally have more capacity...smaller size guns have less capacity in the same caliber...

could go on all day with those statements...
 

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One more C = "Will you really carry?"

There's a lot you can and maybe will do on an occasional basis that you simply won't do day-in and day-out.

pax
 

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Good first post Fred! :wave:

Hope to hear more from you. :hand10:
 

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Confidence - reliability: will it feed, eject and go bang every time?
Control - can you handle it comfortably and fire it accurately?
Concealability - can you hide it well, even in summer clothes?
Comfort - will your holster be comfy sitting, bending, driving?
Caliber - obviously bigger is better
Capacity - obviously more is better
Cost - both initial cost and the cost to practice

Recognizing EVERYTHING involves a trade-off, i.e. that a larger gun has more capacity and better control but is less concealable and less comfortable. One that costs less may be less reliable. Bigger caliber means less capacity.
I like how you have ranked these. however I think avalibilty of ammo is another factor. I carry a 45 and have a hard time finding practice ammo. Self Defense ammo not so hard to find but I cannot aford to shoot much of it for practice. I sometimes wish I had a 40SW because I can find ammo all day long for it as well as 9mm.
 

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First welcome from Central Texas!!!!!

I like what PAX said, if you don't carry all the time it is very likely that when you need a gun you want have one.

I carry a small 380 and have been taught to shoot until the threat is stopped.

Wife and I both shoot our P3AT as accurately as our 9mmers and that is very accurate and very fast.
 

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I'm not sure I can rank the 7 C's. For me, none of them stand out as being at the top or the bottom. I don't own 'the perfect gun,' but do have a few that meet my criteria which include some, if not all, of the listed C's.

Great first post. Welcome to DC.
 

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For me, the first consideration is Confidence. I don't care how cool some new model is, I'm not going to spend my money or risk my life carrying something that isn't time-tested and proven.

My carry choices reflect that philosophy. (see signature line) In the better part of a decade, I've never had either malfunction in any way. 100% reliable with literally thousands of rounds downrange.

Next, unfortunately would be cost. I'm living on enlisted pay with a family of five. I have to be watch every dime. I would love to have a Wilson Combat 1911 or some souped up Les Baer or even just a Kimber. Unfortunately, I probably won't be able to afford those until the kids are out of the house and paying their own way. Fortunately, not all reliable firearms cost an arm and a leg.

The remainder, I'm pretty flexible on.

WRT to caliber, I'm competent shooting anything up to .50cal, but due to cost, availability and stopping power would stick with the big five: .380, 9mm, .40, .45, and .38/.357. There are so many options with these that I think many of the other rounds are unnecessary. Not that there's anything wrong with them, they just seem superfluous to me.

Concealability is certainly an issue, especially for a small-framed person like myself who isn't into the saggy-baggy look. But innovation can overcome this. Cover garments and holster options abound. I probably wouldn't opt for a full-size 1911 or any other large frame for summer carry, but it CAN be achieved with a bit of ingenuity.

To me, the remaining three, comfort, control and capacity fall into sort of the same category. These can all be addressed with proper training and familiarization, so I don't consider them too much. See some of my other recent posts as I address these topics in some depth.

Semper Fi
 

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1. Confidence
2. Control
3. Concealability
4. Comfort
5. Capacity
6. Caliber
7. Cost

I carry a 642 with CT grips -- I think my priority list defines my snubby pretty well.

John
 

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For me they are 5 C’s pretty much in following order:
Concealability
Cost
Control
Caliber
Comfort
In my case “Cost” does not refer to the initial cost of buying the gun, but to the ammo. If I cannot afford to practice in order to be competent shooting with my carry weapon then I better I leave it at home.
 

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It is an interesting list. I like most of the listed items, but I think confidence involves more than the reliability and mechanical function of the firearm. Confidence should involve other areas, such as proficiency with the firearm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks to all for your responses, and for the warm welcome. I've been lurking here for weeks, while awaiting my CHP (which I picked up yesterday.) Have also been walking around the house for weeks with various handguns "concealed" in various locations and holsters.

Pax, I think the final "C" (will you really carry?) relates to the others: If I'm confident in the weapon's reliability, can hit what I aim for, and can wear it comfortably, I will carry it. Well, concealment is also an issue there, since I don't want someone at a Rotary meeting asking if I'm carrying a gun!

Bladenbullet, I did not say larger calibers have more capacity and better control; I said larger handguns have more capacity and better control. (And I'm not looking to start a caliber war; it just seems to me that caliber and capacity should be two factors to consider in choosing a weapon to carry concealed.)

For example, around the house I've "tried out" my OMT Back-up .380 in stainless, the smallest caliber I'd carry, and almost the smallest gun I have. It slips very nicely into a jeans pocket, but I don't believe I could shoot it accurately or comfortably with just two fingers on the grip (and such a small sight radius.)

Someone living in a "bad" neighborhood might rank capacity higher and concealment lower. Someone in an NPE would give up capacity over concealment.

Be assured I'm looking for opinions, not a fight.

Fred
 

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Confidence - reliability: will it feed, eject and go bang every time?
Control - can you handle it comfortably and fire it accurately?
Concealability - can you hide it well, even in summer clothes?
Comfort - will your holster be comfy sitting, bending, driving?
Caliber - obviously bigger is better
Capacity - obviously more is better
Cost - both initial cost and the cost to practice

Recognizing EVERYTHING involves a trade-off, i.e. that a larger gun has more capacity and better control but is less concealable and less comfortable. One that costs less may be less reliable. Bigger caliber means less capacity.

This (above) is how I would order these factors, but I'm a newbie and am curious to know if those more experienced would have different priorities or add additional factors...

Fred
Not necessarily. Off the top of my head, I can think of a bunch of guns that score very favorably in all of those catagories.
 

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I only have 3 C's, Comfort, Concealment, Can I get to it?
Everyone balances these differant, including the other C's listed by others. So isnt alot of this just preference?
 

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The only " C " I consider is CONFIDENCE

I'm confident that my firearm is always with me.
I'm confident that I have the ability to deliver accurate fire to target rather it be 5 feet or 50 yards.
I'm confident that my firearm will function as required
I'm confident that the caliber is capable of performing it's required task.
I'm confident that my ammunition provides the highest performance available.


My Confidence comes from decades of training and carry.

"Yeah though I walk thru the valley ........... "

 

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Life has no guarantees, anything can malfunction and it may happen at the worst (Murphy) time.

Confidence
Center of Mass
Call 911 (and an attorney)

:comeandgetsome:
 

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Life has no guarantees, anything can malfunction and it may happen at the worst (Murphy) time.

Confidence
Center of Mass
Call 911 (and an attorney)

:comeandgetsome:

I can always count on Retsup99 to give me the common sense answer LOL.
 

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...
For example, around the house I've "tried out" my OMT Back-up .380 in stainless, the smallest caliber I'd carry, and almost the smallest gun I have. It slips very nicely into a jeans pocket, but I don't believe I could shoot it accurately or comfortably with just two fingers on the grip (and such a small sight radius.)

Be assured I'm looking for opinions, not a fight.

Fred
The highlighted section above indicates to me that you need to focus on SD shooting. Just about every course will teach you that your front sight is all you'll use so the sight radius is immaterial. You can also do fine with a two rather than 3 finger grip. It isn't target or bullseye shooting anymore. You need to set your equipment up for your own CC situation(s).

I have 3 pistols set up for CC which allows me to select the "best" setup for each of MY CC situations and also provide for me to always carry.

My preferred option is to carry a G26 (12+1) in a fanny pack or super tuck with 2 spare mags and a P380 (6+1) in my pocket or IWB as a bug. I'm older and live in a tourist area so I can get away with the fanny pack since a lot of people have them. I've just acquired a PM9 to use either as a primary or as a BUG.

My next choice will be the PM9, pocket or IWB with the P380 as a BUG and the final choices are either the PM9 or P380 in a pocket where deep concealment is needed.

The G26 has Trijicon night sights an a CT LG, The PM9 is getting a Big Dot front sight with the rear blacked out and has a CT LG and the P380 is getting the Big Dot with the blackened rear and CT LG.

My weekly range time is devoted to center of mass, multiple rapid shots on target and mag changes, not eliminating the center of a target.

My lifestyle and activities are varied and don't lend themselves to one CC solution - YMMV.

I feel comfortable with my any of my weapons. My key considerations are a reliable weapon and backup where possible, with the most firepower possible. I carry th most I can within the limits of my social agenda and the law.

If I ever decide to start bullseye shooting, I'll get an appropriate weapon.
 
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