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On Sunday my FIL and I shot off about 100 round each. My FIL is very new to hand guns but is an amazing shot with a long rifle. One question that he had for me was in terms of recoil control as a way to lessen the time that you are out of sight picture.

For me, I position my arms to act as a spring and hold the gun as high as I can and drop my head a bit. That why the recoil pushes my arms, elbows bend a bit and gun stays reasonably horizontal at all times with minimal movement. He was trying to do the same thing, but his barrel would still come up a bit more than he was comfortable with. However each shot was still reasonably close and every shot was on the target.

I have seen some videos where there is almost no evidence of recoil at all, and they are shooting 40 or 45's.

What other suggestions do you have regarding recoil control?
 

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With a proper grip (assuming right-handed here), your right hand should be just a little higher than your left. While shooting, put a little forward tension on the gun with your right hand, and a little backward tension with your left hand. This will serve to reduce muzzle flip.
 

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Hmmm, I'll have to try that, I also have a problem with recoil, another thing is since I am older I get fatigued and have a hard time holding my handgun at arms length for very long, are there any exercises that help with that besides dry firing?
 

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I teach my students to extend their are out to a "mechanical lock' they're straight out. This way it's easier to be consistant. The lock stops the extension in the same place every time. If you bend your arms to act as a shock absorber, the angle at which they are bent is not always the same. And so it goes, different presentation, different results. I'm not saying my way is the only way, or if it's right or wrong, but consistancy needs to be programed into your muscle memory. Just try this and see if it works for you. Feet shoulder width apart. If your right handed, left foot slightly forward. Shift your weight forward over your knees, like your being attacked from the front. extend your arms straight out, not so hard as to induce muscle tremors, but don't bend them. Grip your gun as high up on the grip as you can so as not to interfere with the slide. The skin between your thumb and forefinger should be a little wrinkled from your grip on the gun. Thumbs forward. This should reduce percieved recoil, maybe not felt recoil, but the gun shouldn't jump off target as much. Let the gun settle back on its own, don't muscle it down, it will settle back by itself. Check how your allowing the trigger to reset after each shot, that will help with getting back on target faster. Try it, hope it helps.
 
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What the support hand is going during the shot will make a difference as well. However, the physical configuration of guns differs - e.g., you grip a revolver differently than an autopistol. What gun are you and FIL shooting?
 

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^ +1. Grip is very, very important. It's almost an absolute, when it comes to recoil-control. There's a drill common to many top-tier pistol classes where the student is asked to get a best-possible grip on their gun at 3 to 5 yards, sight-in, and the instructor will then manipulate the trigger violently (either with their finger or with a pencil/pen/chopstick/screwdriver/etc.) - if the student does their job correctly, none of the shots "jerking the trigger" even with such violence will depart the A-zone or -0 zone. That's how important the grip is.

Upper body presentation is the next factor. Here, there's two schools of thought: one is to mechanically "lock" your joints as much as possible and use your skeletal structure (and mass) as a literal firm abutment against recoil. The other school espouses muscular "shock absorption," with the joints bent. Ultimately, it's up to the individual to figure out exactly which of these two techniques - or a hybrid thereof - works best for him/her as an individual.
 

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Upper body presentation is the next factor. Here, there's two schools of thought: one is to mechanically "lock" your joints as much as possible and use your skeletal structure (and mass) as a literal firm abutment against recoil. The other school espouses muscular "shock absorption," with the joints bent. Ultimately, it's up to the individual to figure out exactly which of these two techniques - or a hybrid thereof - works best for him/her as an individual.
Grip and core, grip and core....I prefer the "lock" because it is what your body is going to do under stress.

Take a look at this video for some pointers..

 

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Another to check out.

 

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Grip and core, grip and core....I prefer the "lock" because it is what your body is going to do under stress.
I prefer locking-out for more consistency as well. Also, it seems that my upper body doesn't (yet :lol:) complain about locking-out. For me, I've also got the benefit of mass: locked out, that's a lot of meat to push, and I in-turn get much better control that way. I don't necessarily always come to full-presentation when I shoot, particularly dynamically, but I do take the time to lock-out if time/opportunity presents itself, or if the situation demands the utmost precision.

I also believe that there's definitely something to be said about everything from grip strength to core fitness as well. While I believe that, to an extent, these are secondary considerations, these are nevertheless areas that the aspiring shooter (and aren't we all? :wink:) should pay attention to and constantly improve upon.
 

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I prefer locking-out for more consistency as well. Also, it seems that my upper body doesn't (yet :lol:) complain about locking-out. For me, I've also got the benefit of mass: locked out, that's a lot of meat to push, and I in-turn get much better control that way. I don't necessarily always come to full-presentation when I shoot, particularly dynamically, but I do take the time to lock-out if time/opportunity presents itself, or if the situation demands the utmost precision.

I also believe that there's definitely something to be said about everything from grip strength to core fitness as well. While I believe that, to an extent, these are secondary considerations, these are nevertheless areas that the aspiring shooter (and aren't we all? :wink:) should pay attention to and constantly improve upon.
Like you I lock out for consistency as well, it is what are body is going to do under stress. As far as the core, I believe it is one of the more important Items to focus on, not fitness, but the core of the body. Everyone has one, they just need to learn to focus and use it. Good posts TSI...:yup:
 

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This is why I joined this forum. Hmm? Thanks guys.
 

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Grip high on the tang of the firearm. Roll your support hand forward and fill in the gaps left by your dominant hand. Like so... btw I hate the M9...

 

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The push/pull method works well to stabilize the piece, but the other part is stance, or as already mentioned, core.

Are you using a Weaver, or Isosceles stance, or modified of either?

For me the Weaver allows more controllable recoil control because it allows me to use the bicep of my strong hand as I would a rifle stock, and gets more mass behind the pistol. It allows is the foundation of my defensive shooting techniques.

My advice is to learn both and even modify them to suit your particular shooting style and see what works best.
 
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Another thing I meant to mention is the Isosceles stance is the "in" thing now with the current training of private and LE. I do not now or have ever liked this as a base or standard defensive shooting stance, for various reasons, but it is arguably the fastest, but the control is controlled solely by the grip and arms and shoulders.

For fast competition style shooting it excells, but IMO, not for practical SD applications.
 
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Another thing I meant to mention is the Isosceles stance is the "in" thing now with the current training of private and LE. I do not now or have ever liked this as a base or standard defensive shooting stance, for various reasons, but it is arguably the fastest, but the control is controlled solely by the grip and arms and shoulders.

For fast competition style shooting it excells, but IMO, not for practical SD applications.
Pincus talks about how it is what our bodies will do naturally under stress. I have found this to be the case as well. I am not saying that its the only thing out there. I just train to the way my body is going to react. Its good to give the OP as much info so they can make a decision that works for them...
 

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I think we need to get proficient with as many ways as possible, just keep in mind if your in the dark in your house dont hold your gun way out in front while clearing or if getting shot at , your in the old FBI crouch returning fire it would be hard to keep both arms locked we need to be able to shoot well from all positions an be creative while practicing never know when or how it might happen might be sitting in your car or even tying your shoe just be aware an deliberate.
 

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People will say that the Weaver stance is not natural to learn. When grandson was 8yrs. old was showing him how to shoot started with Isosceles he was not doing real well. Told him to hold like he wanted he came up in a prefect Weaver 3yrs. later that's still how he shoots. So it I think it can come natural, it was the same when I started.
 

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There are different schools of thought, and some will not agree with me, but I have found the Weaver to be more natural in reaction to a shooting threat, offer more protection by putting heavy upper arm bone between a bullet and the chest cavity, and present a smaller portion of the body as a target area.

It also makes it more ready to assume other positions that provide minimizing the body, or egress.
 

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I don't think recoil can be controlled. Recoil needs to be absorbed from head to toe with a follow true like swinging a bat or a club or throwing a ball.
 
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