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Does anyone have any experience with an after market recoil reduction device for a semi automatic pistol?

If so, are they something I should consider? What brands? etc.
 

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I firmly believe in the KISS principle. Such parts are just one more thing to tie up a semi IMO. I installed a Wilson recoil reduction guide rod system on my 1911 Springer and had FTF problems with it immediately. It't now long gone, never to be seen again.

If you do some hand and forearm strengthening exercises they will help along with a good stance and grip in reducing recoil naturally. A strength training / cardio routine will also improve your overall body strength helping out with recoil management and improve your quality of life.

If you cannot shoot a hard recoiling caliber well drop down to a smaller caliber. Shot placement is #1!!!! A well placed shot from a 9mm to the heart or brain beats a .357 Sig hit or miss to a non vital body part. Our local PD went from Sig 226's to Glock .357 Sig's. 40 % of the force did not qualify on the first outing with that snappy round. It's now around 20%. We should of stayed with the 9mm's IMO.

JMO
 

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My only experience has been in using an HK USPc which has some sort of internal system...but I really couldn't tell any big difference since I can't shoot it WITHOUT the system in place.

For the most part, the only one I've ever been impressed with were the Knoxx Stock on shotguns...everything else (except perhaps porting barrels...something I wouldn't want to mess with on a defensive pistol) seems to remind me of all those 'fuel-efficiency gadgets' available...if they really worked, more mainstream options would use them.

Really, some good instruction and practice (even starting smaller and working up) goes a long way with handling recoil...at least in common calibers and in my experience.

Also, I always find that shooting a few +p's through a light pistol, then moving back to something larger REALLY improves my handling of recoil!
 

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You have a few options for felt recoil reduction.

One would be to switch out your present guide rod for a solid Tungsten Carbide guide rod which will reduce muzzle lift simply by adding dead weight.

One of the very best was the Harrts Recoil Reducer which cut perceived recoil by about 25% in the SIGs.
They WERE available for the SIGs but, are no longer being made as Mr. Harrt passed away quite some time ago.
The Harrts was a beautifully machined hollow, sealed, Stainless steel guide rod filled with liquid Mercury and three Stainless steel ball bearings.
It worked on the principle that a certain portion of the recoil energy is actually "used up" to fracture the Mercury inside the guide rod with each shot.
That energy being subtracted from the total recoil energy.
They WERE popping up on Ebay from time to time.
In fact a few were listed not too long ago and I was going to buy them as an investment even though I did not own the particular models of guns that they were intended for.
They are rare and much in demand by some folks "in the know" - NOT so much because those people are recoil sensitive but BECAUSE they cut down on "shot to shot" recovery time for rapid fire shooting.


Also you could look at SPRINCO. I'll get you the link. They are basically a guide rod with a captive spring that reduces the slide energy after the spent cartridge is ejected and before the slide impacts the frame.
Here is the link to Sprinco. http://www.sprinco.com/




Yet another option would be to go with the Mag-Na-Port porting system which DOES work but could possibly be problematic when shooting the firearm defensively from certain positions due to expelled gases.
Though I think the actual real danger of that is somewhat overblown especially with the MagNaPort system which has ports that are EDM engineered to directionally control the expelled gases.
Here is the link. http://www.magnaport.com/

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I should add that I normally carry a Colt C. Commander and I do not have any guide rod in it at all or any of my other Colts.
I am not recoil sensitive but, my SIG P220 has a Harrts installed in it since function is in no way compromised and there is a real reduction in muzzle lift during extreme rapid fire. So...it's all gain with no compromise and no loss of reliability.
 

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"Recoil Reduction Device Advice Requested"

I've got nothing on this topic, the thread name is just fun to say
 

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I've never tried any of them, so I can't say much about how well they work.
I do know I just don't shoot a light weight semi-auto worth a darn.
I can't the broadside os a barn with hubby's Glock 19, but I can shoot 2" groups all day long with my S&W Model 29, with the .44Magnum rounds or .44Spl.
A heavy steel frame revolver just by it's mass takes up a lot of the recoil and muzzle flip.
Muzzle flip is what I find to be my problem, I'm just not used to it and subconciously try to control it when I fire, pulling my shots, low and usually right.
On the occasions that I fire my Kimber Pro Crimson Carry I have to conciously think about not trying to stop the flip, not something I want to have to try to remember in a defensive situation.
 

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Magnaport

Another option would be to go with the Mag-Na-Port porting system which DOES work but could possibly be problematic when shooting the firearm defensively from certain positions due to expelled gases.
Though I think the actual real danger of that is somewhat overblown especially with the MagNaPort system which has ports that are EDM engineered to directionally control the expelled gases.
Magnaport does beautiful work and the quality is magnificent. In my very limited experience, one gun, it made only a very marginal difference.

I think the advice given to work on strengthening ones arms and wrists is pretty good advice. There was a 6 month period where I bought a gym membership and worked out 3-5 times a week, mostly with weights, chin ups, and similar stuff that builds upper body strength. That had a very big effect on my ability to handle recoil. Of course it didn't last once I got tired of going to the gym.

So, my advice would be trade in a gun that you can't handle for one in a caliber that you can handle. Control is the name of the game.
 

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Here's the best recoil reduction device you can ever own:

Its called PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE........
 

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Only thing I ever really found was reloading my own ammo,I can find a load that not only functions the weapon reliably but is very comfortable to shoot
 

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One other option is to add pewter grips. They are available for 1911s and some other firearms. Their only function is to add dead weight to the firearm.
Of course the firearm then becomes heavier to lug around all day.

The recoil reducing special polymer grips are also an option.
They have a property of preventing a portion of the recoil energy from traveling/transferring through the grips to the fingers, hands, and arms.
And so the firearm shoots "softer."
 

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I had a HAARTS recoil reducer in my first Glock M21 45acp. Indeed it did reduce the felt recoil by 30-40% in my gun.
 

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Heavy calibers only require proper training and practice...

Practice makes perfect. A heaver guide rod helps. But if you still cant manage the recoil, I suggest a smaller caliber.
I taught my daughter to shoot when she was 10. By the time she was 12 she was handling full house 357 loads. She had a little friend (her dad was also an NRA Instructor -- he recently passed away) and that girl had been a "preemie newborn." She had tiny spindly arms and legs but SHE was a bullseye shooter at age 14 with full house 44 magnum loads.

In fact, her dad took her on a hog hunt for her 16th birthday. That little gal waded into hip deep swamp with a Smith M29 and blasted away at a GIANT HOG. BLAM! BLAM! BLAM! tracking laterally, left to right.

When dressed it weighed in at about 300 pounds! That pig fed 35+ folks after being cooked by a local restaurant that had wild game on the menu already. I was there at the party and can attest to the wonderful taste as well as the size of the pig.

I simply don't believe that there are calibers too big too shoot in major production model handguns. All that is required is proper training and shooter desire. From then on: Practice.:comeandgetsome:
 

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My only experience has been in using an HK USPc which has some sort of internal system...
The USPc's recoil reduction system is more of a damage prevention system. The teflon buffer keeps the frame from being battered too much. The USP fullsize has a system like the sprinco system and it really works well. My full size USP 40 is MUCH more pleasant to shoot than my compact 40. I'm not "recoil" sensitive at all but the fullsize is much easier to keep on target even with very little weight difference between the two.
 
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